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High-number Gene Fragment Assembly
Category(s):
For Information, Contact:
Dario Valenzuela
Senior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciences
515-294-4740
licensing@iastate.edu
Web Published:
8/25/2016
ISURF #
4280
Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that can assembly up to 45 fragments into a full-length gene sequence with only two steps, the assembly step and the PCR step.

Development Stage:
Description:
Gene synthesis technology, in contrast to gene engineering, is a method in synthetic biology that is used to create genes de novo. It has become a powerful tool in many fields of recombinant technology including gene therapy, vaccine development and molecular engineering. Current approaches are mostly based on a combination of organic chemistry and molecular biological technique, and requires multiple steps to successfully assembly a full-length gene. For instance, oligonucleotide ligation and PCR-based assembly. Also, the number of DNA fragments in one assembly is always limited to 11 or even less. To solve this problem, ISU researchers have developed an assembly method with the help of the thermodynamic analysis software PICKY created by the same group previously. The assembly method can push the limit up to 45 fragments and only needs two steps in one reaction tube, the assembly step and the PCR step. With this technique, companies can synthesize much longer genes with many fragments using one reaction instead of the tiered assembly scheme. This will improve both the cost and quality of gene synthesis services.

Group:
Advantage:
• Allows high number fragments (up to 45) in one assembly reaction
• Able to synthesize longer genes for various follow-up experiments
• Low-cost and high quality gene synthesis service
• Easy to be adapted in the laboratory
Application:
Gene synthesis

Patent Information:
*To see the full version of the patent(s), follow the link below, then click on "Images" button.

Patent:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Direct Link: