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Gene controlling spontaneous haploid genome doubling in maize
Category(s):
For Information, Contact:
Dario Valenzuela
Senior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciences
515-294-4740
licensing@iastate.edu
Web Published:
6/21/2017
ISURF #
4636
Summary:
A specific mutation in a maize gene is associated with enhanced spontaneous haploid genome doubling.

Development Stage:

Description:
To produce commercial hybrid maize one inbred corn line is crossed with a different inbred line. Using traditional breeding, it takes 5 to 8 generations to develop one inbred line. Doubled haploid (DH) technology typically produces inbred corn lines in a couple of generations, since the offspring contain only a single genome instead of two.  Inducer lines are used as pollinators in the DH approach.  DH has been widely adopted by maize breeders.  Artificial haploid genome doubling, which commonly involves toxic and costly chemicals, is a major challenge in the DH process. ISU researchers have identified a a specific mutational change in maize which is associated with the spontaneous haploid doubling effect. This discovery opens the way for the rapid introduction of the mutation in elite germplasm by either marker assisted breeding or gene editing.

Advantage:
• Mutation that is easily transferable
• Avoidance of costly toxic chemical to double haploid genomes
Patent Information:
*To see the full version of the patent(s), follow the link below, then click on "Images" button.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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