Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:04:25 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:04:25 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityGenetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21051Summary:
The genetic basis of Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) in pigs and tests that can be used to identify SCID pigs and SCID carriers have been established

Description:
ISU researchers previously identified and documented, for the first time, the presence of SCID in pigs. Additional research on the experimental mutant pig line developed at ISU  enabled the identification of the genomic region harboring the causative mutation. The discovery  of the mutation allowed the development of genetic tests that can be used to identify SCID pigs and SCID carriers. The identification and understanding of the genetic basis for the SCID mutation will allow further characterization of the SCID phenotype for animal disease and biomedical research, including research into the immune system, cancer research, the effects of disease, cell and tissue transplantation, and for testing of new vaccines and therapeutic agents for immuno-compromised individuals. SCID pigs provide a much better animal model for such purposes than the widely used SCID mice and, thus, development of this model could potentially be extremely useful for advancing biomedical research and drug discovery . 

Advantage:
• Rapid ID of SCID pigs in litters for biomedical research
• Tool for  genetic surveillance of commercial pig lines

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3992:  Immunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Research 

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Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:39:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210514044Fri, 08 Sep 2017 09:24:05 GMTSummary:

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]]>Group:ISURF 3992:  Immunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Research 

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineGenetic Test and Genetic Basis for SCID in pigsUtilityUnited States9,745,56114/592,5861/8/20158/29/20172/17/20359/8/20179/8/2017FalseImmunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Researchhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19191Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified pigs that have a severely impaired immune system that could serve as important biomedical model for the study of immune system and other diseases in humans.

Description:
Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a genetic defect that causes newborn animals to lack T or B cells in circulation and to have few or no lymphocytes in their primary or secondary lymphoid tissues.  SCID has been shown to have an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in certain mouse strains as well as in horses, some dog breeds, and humans, but is perhaps best known as the ‘bubble boy’ disease, which is an X-linked version of SCID in humans.  Affected neonates do not show clinical manifestations of the defect while suckling.  However, as maternal antibody wanes, the animals become susceptible to opportunistic infections to which they inexorably succumb. ISU researchers and their colleagues at Kansas State University have recently identified a SCID-like syndrome in a line of pigs originally bred for traits related to feed efficiency.  Because of the closer physiological resemblance between humans and pigs, these animals may have utility as a biomedical model for SCID and immunodeficiency diseases in humans that is more suitable than the current mouse models.  In addition, the anatomical and physiological similarities between humans and pigs would make these SCID pigs a superior biomedical model for research into cell and tissue transplantation, cancer research and efficacy of chemotherapeutics, as well as for testing new vaccines.

Advantage:
• More clinically relevant model for investigation of human immunodeficiency, cancer, and other diseases

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

Development Stage:
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Matings that produced the affected pigs have been repeated and all litters have been confirmed to have at least one affected pig; genotyping analysis is in process.  ISU is seeking commercialization partners for these valuable research animals.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191913992Fri, 08 Sep 2017 09:24:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProbiotic treatment of gut inflammationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25990Summary:
A screening methodology to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains and strains identified using such methodology.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Probiotics are live organisms that confer beneficial health effects to human and animals. The use of probiotics to treat gut inflammation is widespread and has been ongoing for decades. Critically, none of the probiotics used for this purpose have been approved by any governmental regulatory body principally because there is no defined mechanism by which they work. This prevents any approval by the FDA.
 
ISU researchers have discovered new biochemical properties in some probiotics that would explain how some of them work to reduce gut inflammation. In addition, they have developed a screening method to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains with the desired biochemical properties. Use of the screening methodology yielded specific strains that are available for licensing.

Advantage:
• New discovery of a microbial endocrinology-based mechanism
• Screening methodology to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains.
• Probiotic strains available for licensing.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4568: Neurotransmitter transport in probiotics

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]]>Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:53:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/259904644Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:58:16 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description: 
ISU researchers have discovered new biochemical properties in some probiotics that would explain how some of them work to reduce gut inflammation. In addition, they have developed a screening method to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains with the desired biochemical properties. Use of the screening methodology yielded specific strains that are available for licensing.

]]>Advantage:]]>Group:ISURF 4568: Neurotransmitter transport in probiotics

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseNeurotransmitter transport in probioticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24015Summary:
The discovery of the existence of a neurotransmitter transport mechanism in some probiotics is disclosed as well as a method to identify suitable probiotic strains with high potential to modulate neurotransmitter levels in an animal or human host.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Probiotics are designated as living microorganisms that may be used for both maintenance of health as well as treatment of specific clinical conditions ranging from gastrointestinal infections to the treatment of neuropsychiatric-related behavioral issues. Probiotics are also extensively used in the farm production industry (chickens, pigs and cattle) as well as in the treatment of companion animals (dogs, cats, horses).

The inventor (Dr. Lyte) first proposed the creation of the field of microbial endocrinology in 1992 and recent research reports dramatic effects of microbes from the gut on mental function. Dr. Lyte reports in this disclosure that certain probiotic strains possess a neurotransmitter transporter system that would provide a mechanism by which to select probiotics for defined conditions, i.e., tailor the probiotic strain to the treatment. The identification of a neurotransmitter transporter system is reported to be novel. In addition, this disclosure identified an assay that can be used as the first step of a screening process to select potentially beneficial probiotic strains.

Advantage:
• Ability to identify probiotic strains influencing neurotransmitter levels.
• Simple screening method.

Application:
Discovery of beneficial probiotics capable to transport neurotransmitters

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4644: Probiotic treatment of gut inflammation

Patents:

Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 14:10:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240154568Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:55:06 GMTSummary:

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The inventor (Dr. Lyte) first proposed the creation of the field of microbial endocrinology in 1992 and recent research reports dramatic effects of microbes from the gut on mental function. Dr. Lyte reports in this disclosure that certain probiotic strains possess a neurotransmitter transporter system that would provide a mechanism by which to select probiotics for defined conditions, i.e., tailor the probiotic strain to the treatment. The identification of a neurotransmitter transporter system is reported to be novel. In addition, this disclosure identified an assay that can be used as the first step of a screening process to select potentially beneficial probiotic strains.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 4644: Probiotic treatment of gut inflammation

]]>Patents:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseCanine intestinal stem cells for drug development, precision and regenerative medicinehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25529Summary:
Canine intestinal cell lines (i.e. enteroids) cultures for basic and applied medical research.

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Description:
Canine intestinal cell lines (i.e. enteroids) cultures for basic and applied medical research. The enteroids were developed with the goal enable the use of stem cells from dogs that spontaneously develop diseases of the gastrointestinal tract to improve the predictability of preclinical models used for gastrointestinal research. Further, the researchers envision a wide range of applications using dog enteroids including the study of the biology of intestinal bowel disease and intestinal cancer, screening of potential therapeutic drugs, optimization of individualized medicine, and transplantation of enteroids in canine clinical trials.

Advantage:
• Extensive characterization of cell lines in the organoids by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and RNAscope
• Proof of genetic stability over passages and proof of canine origin of cells
• Archive of enteroids from different intestinal sites of dogs and from dogs diagnosed with intestinal disease (inherited diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer)

Application:
Biomedical research and therapeutics.

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:22:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/255294641Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:30:45 GMTSummary:

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]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseNovel anthelmintic drugshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25369Summary:
This invention includes two new anthelmintic compounds. The compounds are (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine and (S)-5-bromoanabasine. These compounds are both derivatives of the nicotine molecule and are agonists of a nicotinic ACh receptor. This invention may take advantage of the large market for animal parasiticides and the lack of existing patented drugs for deworming.

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Development Stage:
The current status of the invention is at the proof of concept stage.

Description:
Nematode parasites infect ~2 billion people world-wide and infections are treated and prevented by anthelmintic drugs, some of which act on nicotinic Acetyl Choline receptors (nAChRs). There is an unmet need for novel therapeutic agents because of concerns about the development of resistance. ISU researchers selected the Asu-ACR-16 receptor from a significant nematode parasite, Ascaris, as a pharmaceutical target and nicotine as the basic moiety to facilitate the development of a novel class of anthelmintics. Asu-ACR-16 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology and determined agonist concentration-current-response plots to estimate the potencies (EC50s) of the agonists. The researchers synthesized a novel agonist, (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine, and show that it is more potent than other nicotine alkaloids on Asu-ACR-16. Other related (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine derivatives have also been developed. Such agonists have the potential to circumvent drug resistance that has arisen following repeated treatment of nematode parasites with other classes of anthelmintic drugs and are a useful lead for anthelmintic drug development.

Advantage:
• Target nicotinic ACh receptor
• Based on easily derived chemical
• Can replace drugs to which resistance has been developed
• Potentially useful in both human and animal populations

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253694541Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:09 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseInduction Protocol for Bovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions Using a Cocktail of Pure Growth Organismshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23907Summary:
ISURF #4258 describes a method for inducing papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) in cattle, an important disease for the US dairy industry that is leading cause of lameness.  Also disclosed are a number of bacterial isolates that are used to induce the disease model for this polymicrobial infection.  Advantages of this technology include lower cost, more faithful and consistent replication of lesions seen with the natural disease, and rapid disease induction.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Digital dermatitis (DD) is an economically important polymicrobial disease process of dairy cattle that, despite 35 years of research, remains etiologically undefined. It is the leading cause of lameness in US dairy cattle. In addition to the cost associated with treatment and lost production, it represents a significant welfare concern for the industiy. For these reasons, lameness, and specifically DD, was ranked as the top priority by Daily Industry Stakeholders at the 2010 USDA ARS-NIFA Anitnal Health Research Planning Workshop. Although the disease  is responsive to antibiotics, a definitive bacterial cause has not been identified. Treponema spp. are regularly isolated from DD lesions, however attempts to induce classic disease lesions with pure culture of these microorganisms remain universally unsuccessful. Based on these findings, and the lack of efficacy of Treponema based vaccines, it is widely believed that the disease is polybacterial in nature. The identity of microorganisms that work in concert with Treponema spp. to cause the clinical presentation of DD in cattle has remained unknown. Lack of this knowledge is an inportant problem because it prevents the development of effective intervention strategies that target the causative agents of DD. One important tool for studying this disease process is the development of a consistent model of disease induction that results in lesions characteristic of the naturally occurring lesions. Such a model will allow for indepth study of the disease pathogenesis, experimental studies to try and fulfill identification of causative organisms and most importantly a model useful for testing experimental interventions (vaccines, treatments, prevention etc). This disclosure describes a novel induction method useful for inducing digital dermatitis lesions that appear consistent with the natural disease process. Furthermore, this method results in reasonably quick induction in the characteristic site of lesion development. Previous induction methods that have been attempted either do not provide consistent results or induce lesions that are not consistent with natural disease.

Advantage:
• Lesions consistent with the natural disease process
• Availability of isolates
• Potential for marked improvement vs. current approaches

Application:
Veterinary Research

References:
Animal Model Protocol, Diagnostic, Therapeutic And Vaccine Against Digital Dermatitis, US 2016/0256575


 

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:17:47 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/239074258Tue, 31 Jan 2017 14:04:57 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Animal Model Protocol, Diagnostic, Therapeutic And Vaccine Against Digital Dermatitis, US 2016/0256575

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseCampylobacter jejuni peptide for vaccine developmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23910Summary:
A promising target for designing a diagnostic test and peptide sequence for vaccine development to control Campylobacter jejuni infections in ruminants and humans.

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Description:
Campylobacter jejuni is a major causative agent for abortion in ruminants, particularly in sheep. It is also a major foodborne pathogen and a leading cause of enteritis in humans, responsible for 400-500 million cases of diarrhea annually worldwide each year. In the U.S. alone, C. jejuni accounts for more than 800,000 cases of foodborne illnesses each year. A hyper virulent clone of C. jejuni is the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the U.S. This disclosure identifies a peptide (AEEQGADLLGKSTISTTQKAAPFQADSLGNL) in the predicted external loop 4 of the major outer membrane protein of C. jejuni, which is essential for its hyper-virulence in inducing abortion. The loop 4 sequence is critical for virulence and provides a promising target for designing a diagnostic test and for vaccine development to control C. jejuni infections.

Advantage:
• Subunit vaccine
• Highly specific target
• No need to culture the pathogen

References:
1. September 6, 2016. Journal Article. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni /PNAS USA

2. Sahin et al. Emergence of a tetracycline resistant campylobacter jejuni clone associated with outbreaks of ovine abortion in the United States. J. Clin. Microbiol. May 2008 p. 1663-1671

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:58:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/239104559Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:58:24 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:1. September 6, 2016. Journal Article. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni /PNAS USA

2. Sahin et al. Emergence of a tetracycline resistant campylobacter jejuni clone associated with outbreaks of ovine abortion in the United States. J. Clin. Microbiol. May 2008 p. 1663-1671 ]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseMicroscale Tentacle Actuatorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21029Description:
ISU researchers have invented a soft material-based manipulator for delicate, fragile microscale objects. It is based on a thin-walled elastomeric microtube with an asymmetric wall thickness distribution and one end closed. Upon applying air pressure from the open end, the microtube becomes elongated non-uniformly, bending towards the thick-walled side. This type of bending, however, is often insufficient to induce a spiraling which mimics the coiling motion of biological tentacles, such as those of the octopus. To amplify the bending into multi-turn spiraling, we installed a small extra thickness (i.e., hump) to the exterior of the microtube. When the size and position of the hump were adequate, the microtube could accomplish multi-tum spiraling which is ideal for winding around small objects and scoop them up. This type of conformal spiraling motion is non-destructive since it does not involve squeezing and will be useful for safe handling of cell aggregates, eggs, or biological tissues that are highly fragile.

Advantage:
• Can handle soft, fragile micro-objects that is not offered today
• Capable of grabbing objects as small as ~ 185 µM with a grabbing force of ~ 0.78 mN
• Unique fabrication techniques of the thin, highly deformable microtubes

Application:
Biological microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS)

References:
Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210294387Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:15:31 GMTDescription:

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]]>References:Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePDCoV S1 Protein ELISA for Detection of Porcine Delta Coronavirushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21074Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed an ELISA assay for the detection of Porcine Delta Coronavirus based on the use of a recombinant S1 viral protein.

Description:
Porcine Delta Coronavirus (PDCoV) was first diagnosed in North America in early 2014 where it was associated with enteric disease in pigs. While assays detecting nucleic acids of the virus were implemented quickly, assays to detect anti-PDCoV antibodies lagged far behind. Iowa State Researchers led the development of an indirect PDCoV anti-IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the putative S1 portion of the spike protein. The assay has been validated and was utilized to determine the prevalence of PDCoV in U.S. pigs. The diagnostic sensitivity of the PDCoV ELISA was 91% with a diagnostic specificity of 95%. ISURF is making the materials available under a non-exclusive license.

Advantage:
• S1 protein has been used to validate PDCoV detection
• Detects IgG antibodies
• S1 polypeptide antigen highly conserved for broad detection

Application:
Veterinary Diagnostics

References:
1. PLoS One. 2015; 10(4): e0124363. Published online 2015 Apr 16. doi:  10.1371/journal.pone.0124363  PMCID: PMC4399883

2. Development and Application of an ELISA for the Detection of Porcine Deltacoronavirus IgG Antibodies, Anil Thachil,1 Priscilla F. Gerber,2 Chao-Ting Xiao,1 Yao-Wei Huang,3 and Tanja Opriessnig1,2,*

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>References:

2. Development and Application of an ELISA for the Detection of Porcine Deltacoronavirus IgG Antibodies, Anil Thachil,1 Priscilla F. Gerber,2 Chao-Ting Xiao,1 Yao-Wei Huang,3 and Tanja Opriessnig1,2,*

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalsePEDV S1 Protein ELISA for Detection of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21073Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed an ELISA assay for the detection of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) based on the use of the PEDV S1 protein. The assay is capable of detecting anti-PEDV antibody of various classes (IgG, IgA or IgM) in serum, oral fluid, feces, and in colostrum and milk.

Description:
Laboratory diagnosis for PEDV is often performed using PCR as PEDV is difficult to culture; in addition, PEDV can resemble transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) clinically, so it is important for herd management to understand the cause of acute diarrhea in infected pigs. Other methods used for diagnosis include clinical signs, history, ELISA, examination of feces for virus using electron microscopy, and post-mortem examination. This technology circumvents many of the difficulties and time constraints associated with these traditional methods. ISURF is making the materials available under a non-exclusive license.

Advantage:
• Works with a number of biological samples
• Detects various classes of Ig
• Can be used with a variety of sample types

Application:
Veterinary Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalsePorcine Deltacoronavirushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21072Summary:
ISU researchers have identified, purified, and characterized a cell-culture derived, plaque-cloned isolate of porcine deltacoronavirus (“ISU isolate”) from a clinical case

Description:
The ISU isolate has been adapted for propagation in a swine cell line for easy manipulation in vitro and its full-length genome has been sequenced. The ISU isolate has been demonstrated to cause diarrheic disease in conventional growing pigs, suggesting that it retains its original pathogenicity. The ISU isolate can be used as antigen for various vaccine formula (e.g., live, killed, genetically modified) and antibody production (both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies) as well as for antibody assays (e.g., indirect FA test, ELISA, SN, Western immunoblot). Other uses include; positive control for viral assays such as PCR assays, and virus isolation.

Advantage:
• Adapted to growth in culture
• Can be used as antigen for various vaccine formula and antibody production
• Can be used as a positive control for viral assays such as PCR assays, and virus isolation

Application:
Veterinary Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseStreptococcus suis Isolateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21052Description:
Streptococcus Suis is a pig pathogen that occasionally infects humans. Iowa State University is making available for non-exclusive licensing four Streptococcus Suis isolates with potential for research use, diagnostics, and development of vaccines. Both viruses  [A/Swine/ISUVDL11/05 (H3N2-cluster III) and A/Swine/ISUVDL12/05 (reassortant H1N1)] represent 2005 swine influenza viruses contemporary isolates of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes that circulating in US swine populations at the time.

Advantage:
• Ready to use
• Adapted to growth in culture

Application:
Animal Health/ Vaccine Development/ Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:44:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210523342Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:44:02 GMTDescription:Advantage:Application:Animal Health/ Vaccine Development/ DiagnosticsIntellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalse
Swine Influenza Viruses for Vaccine and Diagnosticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21042Summary:
Iowa State University is making available for non-exclusive licensing two swine influenza A virus isolates with potential for research use, diagnostics, and development of vaccines. The viruses isolated in 2005 originated from pigs exhibiting respiratory stress. Both viruses  [A/Swine/ISUVDL11/05 (H3N2-cluster III) and A/Swine/ISUVDL12/05 (reassortant H1N1)] represent 2005 swine influenza viruses contemporary isolates of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes circulating in US swine populations.

Advantage:
• Ready to use
• Adapted to growth in culture

Application:
Animal Health/Vaccine Development/Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:27:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210423345Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:29:24 GMTSummary:

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]]>Intellectual Property:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseDroplet Actuator and Methods of Droplet Manipulationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21034Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a portable system to perform droplet operations such as transport, mixing, merging, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets. The system uses two electrical motors to tilt a planar platform at pre-specified angles, thereby allowing multiple droplets to move in pre-decided patterns.

Description:
The invention is a portable system to perform droplet manipulations such as transport, mixing, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets.  The novelty is in the methods of moving droplets using gravitational force and mechanical jerks.  The design of hydrophilic patterns, along with the gravitational and mechanical tilting of the platform, help move the droplets.  The utility of this invention is the ease of use and low-cost compared to the existing technology being used today.  This system can help automate a diverse range of applications in molecular diagnostics of physiological samples.

Advantage:
• Portable, cost efficient design compared to currently available automated liquid handling systems
• Uses mechanical jerks and gravity to move droplets vs. current systems which use high electrical voltages, laser beams or vibrations from sound generating devices
• Utilizes unique techniques of printing patterns of specific shapes and sizes on a low-cost transparency film that has been treated to provide hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas

Application:
Immunology, protein chemistry, biomarker identification and molecular diagnosis of physiological samples

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Senecavirus A as Etiology of Vesicular Disease and Methods to Propagate the Virus in Vitrohttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21032Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified, purified, and characterized cell culture-derived isolates of Senecavirus. A. The full genome sequence of the new isolates revealed that the isolates are genetically distinct from previously known Senecavirus A viruses.

Description:
Genetic changes/mutations have made the virus virulent, thus accounting for the 2015 vesicular disease outbreak in show and commercial pigs which have been seen in a number of States in the Midwest including IA, SD, IL, IN, MO, MN. From the rapid spreading and frequent identification of the virus, researchers concluded that prevention and control measures will be needed and that the isolates have value as tangible property for biologics and diagnostics. The isolates have been propagated continuously in culture to high titer at ISU and the idiopathic vesicular disease was reproduced with one isolate (in collaboration with the USDA). Propagation of the virus to a high titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents.

Advantage:
• Distinct new viral strains
• Full genome sequence available
• High titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents
• Addresses a niche market

Application:
Therapeutic / Vaccine Development

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210324416Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:38 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Therapeutic / Vaccine DevelopmentIntellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Senecavirus A as Etiology of Vesicular Disease and Methods to Propagate the Virus in Vitrohttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21031Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified, purified, and characterized cell culture-derived isolates of Senecavirus. A. The full genome sequence of the new isolates revealed that the isolates are genetically distinct from previously known Senecavirus A viruses.

Description:
Genetic changes/mutations have made the virus virulent, thus accounting for the 2015 vesicular disease outbreak in show and commercial pigs which have been seen in a number of States in the Midwest including IA, SD, IL, IN, MO, MN. From the rapid spreading and frequent identification of the virus, researchers concluded that prevention and control measures will be needed and that the isolates have value as tangible property for biologics and diagnostics. The isolates have been propagated continuously in culture to high titer at ISU and the idiopathic vesicular disease was reproduced with one isolate (in collaboration with the USDA). Propagation of the virus to a high titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents.

Advantage:
• Distinct new viral strains
• Full genome sequence available
• High titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents
• Addresses a niche market

Application:
Therapeutic / Vaccine Development

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210314422Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDiffusion Barrier Vaccine Devicehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21025Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an implanted vaccine device designed to generate life-long antibody titers. The basis of the innovation is the slow release of an antigen embedded in a polymeric matrix. Antigen release is a function of the level of circulating antigen-specific antibodies.  By sensing the antibody levels, the device self-regulates antigen release thus ensuring antigen availability for continued antibody production.

Description:
The technology is a three-stage vaccine device, where stage 1 consists of vaccination with the antigen of interest using soluble adjuvant-based delivery. Stage two is a boost delivered using bio-erodible nanoparticles. Stage three is the “smart release” of vaccine where vaccine release is linked to antibody levels. The smart release utilizes a fibrillary matrix where, if immune complexes of antibody and antigen are present, they will be hindered from escaping the depot. If antibody levels fall, the complexes are dissociated and the antigen is small enough to escape from the vaccine depot. This provides a booster-like response leading to increased antibody production.

Advantage:
• Enables immune-regulated release of vaccine
• May reduce or eliminate the need for future booster vaccinations
• May be used with a number of various vaccines
• Addresses a very large market

Application:
Animal Health / Vaccine Development

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210254256Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMouse Monoclonal Anti Clostridium Perfringens Type D epsilon Toxin Antibody (Clone# 4D6)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19981Summary:
The 4D6 monoclonal antibody can detect nanogram quantities by Western blotting of both the Clostridium perfringens epsilon proto-toxin as well as the activated toxin

Description:
The epsilon toxin is one of 12 protein toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens, a Gram positive, anaerobic spore-forming rod. There are five strains of C. perfringens, designated A through E. Each strain produces a unique spectrum of toxins. The epsilon toxin is made by types B and D. This toxin is a pore-forming protein; it causes potassium and fluid leakage from cells. In addition to the epsilon toxin, Clostridium perfringens type D strains produce alpha toxin and type B strains produce alpha and beta toxins. C. perfringens type B causes severe enteritis in young calves, foals, lambs and piglets. Type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and, on rare occasions, in cattle. All five strains can infect wounds in any species.
The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

Advantage:
• Probably the only D epsilon toxin monoclonal antibody available commercially
• Can detect as little as 625pgs of recombinant  epsilon mutant toxoid.
• Easy detection with anti-mouse-IgG-HRP

Application:
Detection of the Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 20 Jul 2015 14:29:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/199814281Mon, 20 Jul 2015 14:30:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseSingle Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microsphereshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19380Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed controlled release vaccine formulations that may have utility for inducing certain types of immune responses

Description:
Successful vaccination often requires multiple immunization shots or boosters to offer complete protection.  In addition, generation of the appropriate type of immune response is also critical for developing immunity, and may be dependent on the type of adjuvant used in the vaccine preparation.  ISU researchers have developed a single-dose, controlled release vaccine formulation based on polyanhydride microspheres.  The microspheres can be loaded with antigenic proteins for immunization, and the microsphere composition controls the release of the antigen.  The need for alum-based adjuvants that tend to induce Th2 immunity is obviated. Additionally, preferential Th1 versus Th2 immune responses can be induced based on how the microspheres are loaded with antigen.  This type of vaccination strategy may improve protection against intracellular pathogens, and be especially useful for the development of vaccines against certain cancers and viruses.  These single dose controlled release vaccine formulations have the potential to simplify vaccination schedules and facilitate mass immunization campaigns. 

Advantage:
• Single-dose vaccine formulation that can be modulated to induce Th1 versus Th2 cellular immunity.
• Reduces the need for adjuvants and may improve safety.
• May replace multiple injections required for some conventional vaccines, resulting in greater compliance with recommended immunization schedules

Application:
Production of single-dose vaccines for certain cancers, viruses and intracellular pathogens; especially useful for the induction of Th1 immune response.

References:
1: “Encapsulation, stabilization, and release of BSA-FITC from polyanhydride microspheres”, Amy S. Determan, Brian G. Trewyn, Victor S.-Y. Lin, Marit Nilsen-Hamilton, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, J. Controlled Release 100:97-109.

2: “Single dose vaccine based on biodegradable polyanhydride microspheres can modulate immune response mechanism”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer H. Wilson, Michael J. Wannemuehler , Balaji Narasimhan, 2006, J. Biomed. Materials. Res. 76:798-810.

3: “Single-dose vaccine carrier for modulation of immune response mechanisms”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer Wilson, Michael Wannemuehler, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, AIChE Annual Meeting, Austin, TX.

This technology is related to ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3729: A Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogens

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Induction of Th1 immunity has been demonstrated following intramuscular injection using the vaccine formulation loaded with tetanus toxoid.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193803176Mon, 20 Jul 2015 13:15:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed a single-dose, controlled release vaccine formulation based on polyanhydride microspheres.  The microspheres can be loaded with antigenic proteins for immunization, and the microsphere composition controls the release of the antigen.  The need for alum-based adjuvants that tend to induce Th2 immunity is obviated. Additionally, preferential Th1 versus Th2 immune responses can be induced based on how the microspheres are loaded with antigen.  This type of vaccination strategy may improve protection against intracellular pathogens, and be especially useful for the development of vaccines against certain cancers and viruses.  These single dose controlled release vaccine formulations have the potential to simplify vaccination schedules and facilitate mass immunization campaigns. 

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Encapsulation, stabilization, and release of BSA-FITC from polyanhydride microspheres”, Amy S. Determan, Brian G. Trewyn, Victor S.-Y. Lin, Marit Nilsen-Hamilton, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, J. Controlled Release 100:97-109.

2: “Single dose vaccine based on biodegradable polyanhydride microspheres can modulate immune response mechanism”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer H. Wilson, Michael J. Wannemuehler , Balaji Narasimhan, 2006, J. Biomed. Materials. Res. 76:798-810.

3: “Single-dose vaccine carrier for modulation of immune response mechanisms”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer Wilson, Michael Wannemuehler, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, AIChE Annual Meeting, Austin, TX.

]]>ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3729: A Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogens

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineControlled-Release Immunogenic Formulations to Modulate Immune ResponseUtilityUnited States7,858,09311/262,31010/28/200512/28/201010/28/20255/13/201511/10/2016Controlled-Release Immunogenic Formulations to Modulate Immune ResponseContinuationUnited States8,173,10412/554,2829/4/20095/8/20126/9/20255/13/201511/10/2016FalseA Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogenshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19374Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved method for delivering antibiotics inside infected cells for more effective treatment.

Description:
Bioerodible polymers have been researched for potential biomedical applications like drug or vaccine delivery for a number of years.  For example, polyesters such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been FDA approved for some applications; however, their suitability for others, such as vaccine delivery, is limited by factors that affect the stability of protein immunogens, such as producing a low pH milieu or inducing protein aggregation as well as acidic compartmentalization that is detrimental to the effectiveness of most antibiotics. In contrast, polyanhydrides have a number of potential advantages for biomedical applications, including chemistry-dependent surface erosion and payload release, a moderate pH microenvironment, and better protein stabilization; polyanhydrides have been used for delivery of plasmid DNA, small molecular weight compounds, and vaccine components.  In addition, polyanhdride microspheres and nanospheres (PAparticles) elicit unique cellular responses from immune cells that stimulate internalization, direct intracellular trafficking and degrade slowly within the cells.  Varying the chemistry of the particle affects particle degradation and alters the fate of the particle within cells. This characteristic can be exploited to target intracellular pathogens which evade host defenses by adapting themselves to the environment within cells and escape killing by antibiotics.  ISU researchers have now developed PAparticles with modified surface chemistries that are capable of entering host cells and delivering antibiotics in the same microenvironment as that of an intracellular pathogen.  Loading of the antibiotics onto the PAparticles does not chemically modify the antibiotics or negate their antimicrobial function. This highly effective targeting of the intracellular environment has to potential to reduce the amount of antibiotic needed to treat such an infection and also provide delayed release, thus improving the bioavailablity of the drug.

Advantage:
• Enhanced uptake compared to PLGA particles
• Targets more favorable intracellular compartments
• Potential for longer bioavailability of encapsulated antibiotics
• Provides greater encapsulation of hydrophobic antibiotics compared to PLGA particles

Application:
Drug delivery

References:
1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Co-localization of the polyanhydride particles with the intracellular pathogen M. paratuberculosis in tissue culture cells has been demonstrated, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193743729Mon, 20 Jul 2015 13:15:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

]]>Group:ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAntimicrobial Compositions and MethodsUtilityUnited States8,449,91612/940,87211/5/20105/28/20134/10/20315/13/20152/27/2017Antimicrobial Polyanhydride NanoparticlesContinuationUnited States8,927,02413/866,5204/19/20131/6/201511/5/20305/13/20152/27/2017FalsePKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosishttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19201Summary:
A researcher has developed a peptide inhibitor for the protein kinase C delta cleavage site that has utility as a research reagent and for the measurement of caspase-3 activity.

Description:
Oxidative stress and apoptosis are considered important common mediators of many diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.  Caspase-3 has been shown to activate protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) through proteolytic cleavage, leading to PKCδ-mediated apoptosis of cultured neuronal cells. Researchers at ISU have developed an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the PKCδ cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  Because of its efficacy, this inhibitor may have utility as a reagent for investigating apoptosis as well as for measuring caspase-3 activity through competitive inhibition assays.  This technology is available for licensing in the areas of research reagents and apoptosis diagnostics.

Advantage:
• The peptide inhibitor is much more potent than other known caspase-3 inhibitors
• Relatively selective
• Demonstrated to be effective as an experimental neuroprotective agent.

Application:
Research (experimental reagent for apoptosis and oxidative cell stress research) and Diagnostic (measurement of caspase-3 activity)

References:
1: “A novel PKC delta (PKCδ) inhibitor protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in neurodegenerative disease models”, Anumantha G. Kanthasamy, Claivarathan Latchoumycandane, Siddharth Kaul, Vellareddy Anantharam and Arti Kanthasamy.  Presented at the Experimental Biology (April 2-6, 2005) and the XXXV International Congress on Physiological Sciences, (March 31-April 5, 2005), San Diego, CA.

2: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
With an IC50 of 6 µM, the peptide inhibitor has been demonstrated to be three-fold more potent than the classical used caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192013172Mon, 01 Jun 2015 07:48:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “A novel PKC delta (PKCδ) inhibitor protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in neurodegenerative disease models”, Anumantha G. Kanthasamy, Claivarathan Latchoumycandane, Siddharth Kaul, Vellareddy Anantharam and Arti Kanthasamy.  Presented at the Experimental Biology (April 2-6, 2005) and the XXXV International Congress on Physiological Sciences, (March 31-April 5, 2005), San Diego, CA.

2: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

]]>Group:ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineMethods and Compositions for Inhibiting PKC Delta Cleavage for Treatment and Prevention of Neurodegeneration and ApoptosisUtilityUnited States7,632,81911/262,67710/31/200512/15/200910/25/20275/7/20158/15/2017FalsepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19578Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an invention which provides novel gel forming methacrylic blocking copolymers that exhibit cationic pH-sensitive behavior as well as good water solubility. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic( polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) polymer. The polymers may be use for drug and gene delivery, protein separation, as structural supplements, and more.

Advantage:
• These copolymers are water-soluble, pH sensitive and capable of thermoreversible gelation near physiological temperatures.

Application:
* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplements

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195782954Tue, 26 May 2015 15:13:51 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplementsStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Materials| Veterinary MedicinepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gels and the Production ThereofUtilityUnited States7,217,77610/366,8642/14/20035/15/20072/14/20235/22/20155/22/2015FalseContemporary Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) Viruses for Improved Vaccineshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19132Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has purified a set of contemporary bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates that may be useful as vaccine strains.

Description:
The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes disease in cattle and other ruminants. Diseased animals may show respiratory and reproductive symptoms ranging from mild to very severe, in some cases resulting in the death of the animal. The disease primarily affects young cattle and usually results in mucosal lesions that can be misdiagnosed because of their similarity to infections by other viruses. BVDV effects significant economic losses to producers globally, and persistently infected cattle may explain the magnitude of such loses since the persistently infected animals are disease reservoirs. Treatment is usually supportive therapy, while control is through management practices (e.g., good biosecurity), elimination of infected animals, and vaccination. While there are a number of BVDV vaccines available, vaccination programs do not provide complete herd protection, which is likely due to an incomplete correspondence between the contemporary antigenic determinants in the field compared to those used for vaccination.  For example, most commercially available modified live vaccines do not appear to protect against BVDV-1b, a strain that emerged in the 1990s in persistently infected cattle.  An ISU investigator has isolated contemporary BVDVs comprising various genotypes (e.g., type 1a, 1b or 2) and biotypes (cytopathic or non-cytopathic strains). Some of the ISU isolates came from diseased animals vaccinated with commercially available BVDV vaccines, further suggesting that current vaccines need to be updated.  Consequently, these new isolates may be useful to develop improved vaccines. Other uses include diagnostics and as challenge strains for vaccine development.

Advantage:
• More representative of currently circulating BVDV strains than strains used in current commercial vaccines
• Include various genotypes and biotypes
• Have utility for vaccine development, diagnostics, or as challenge strains

Application:
Animal health

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
Fourteen BVD V isolates representing different geographic origins (IA, MO, TN) and comprising various genotypes and biotypes have been purified, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191324007Tue, 26 May 2015 07:49:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Development Stage:Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseMycoplasma hyorhinis Field Isolates for Vaccine Developmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19127Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has cultured clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hyorhinis that may have utility for vaccine development.

Description:
Mycoplasma hyorhinis has historically been considered to be a normal comensal organism found in the respiratory tracts of pigs.  More recently, however, M. hyorhinis has been found to be a primary cause of polyserositis in pigs, and has been found also found in association with other important pig pathogens, such as M. hyopneumoniae, the principal causative agent of enzootic pneumonia, and viruses such as porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV).  M. hyorhinis has also been found to cause arthritis in pigs.  Commercial vaccines for protection against M. hyorhinis infection are not available at present, and a limited number of isolates are available for vaccine development since only a few laboratories have M. hyorhinis diagnostic and culturing capabilities.  As part of investigations in M. hyorhinis diagnostics, an ISU researcher has cultured clinical isolates of this organism.  This series of field isolates may be useful for the development of vaccines to protect against M. hyorhinis infection, as well as for serving as challenge strains to determine vaccine efficacy.

Advantage:
• Increases number of isolates available for vaccine development

Application:
Vaccine development; challenge strains

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Development Stage:
Stage1.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191274053Tue, 26 May 2015 07:49:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Mycoplasma hyorhinis has historically been considered to be a normal comensal organism found in the respiratory tracts of pigs.  More recently, however, M. hyorhinis has been found to be a primary cause of polyserositis in pigs, and has been found also found in association with other important pig pathogens, such as M. hyopneumoniae, the principal causative agent of enzootic pneumonia, and viruses such as porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV).  M. hyorhinis has also been found to cause arthritis in pigs.  Commercial vaccines for protection against M. hyorhinis infection are not available at present, and a limited number of isolates are available for vaccine development since only a few laboratories have M. hyorhinis diagnostic and culturing capabilities.  As part of investigations in M. hyorhinis diagnostics, an ISU researcher has cultured clinical isolates of this organism.  This series of field isolates may be useful for the development of vaccines to protect against M. hyorhinis infection, as well as for serving as challenge strains to determine vaccine efficacy.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Development Stage:Stage1.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseHybridoma Cell Lines for Mycoplasma bovishttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19581Description:
Two mouse/mouse stable hybridomas (87, 163) have been developed against M. bovis strain M23. M. bovis is associated with a variety of bovine diseases including arthritis and pneumonia of calves and young cattle, mastitis, and genital tract infections. It is considered the most virulent bovine mycoplasma in the US. Ascite fluid from these two hybridoma cells can be use in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues and is highly specific in ELISA, IFA, and immunoblot analyses to six strains of M. bovis (M23, Emm, Bat, 1315, M66, and M84) originating from cases of bovine pneumonia or mastitis. They show no cross-reactivity with other bovine mycoplasma species often encountered in the US, Canada, and Europe. These species include M. dispar (SDO), M. alkalescens (PG31), M. bovirhinus (CS260), M. arginini (630), M. bovuculi (FS8-7), M. bovigenitalium (ATCC 14173), M. verecundum (ATCC 27862), andM. canadense (275C). Acite fluid from MYB 87 reacts with M. agalactiae (GM 139), a rare sheep and goat pathogen highly related to M. bovis, in IFA tests but not in ELISA. Ascite fluid from MYB 163 does not react with M. agalactiae. MYB 63 is of IgG1 Kappa isotype, while MYB 87 is of IgM Kappa isotype. These hybridomas should be useful in the diagnosis and detection of M. bovis and its related diseases.

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]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195811908Fri, 22 May 2015 14:51:18 GMTDescription:]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740False
Hybridoma Cell Lines for the Production of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Mycoplasma Hyopneumoniahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19575Description:
Hybridoma cell lines F1B6 and F2G5 produce monoclonal antibodies which are unique in their ability to inhibit the in vitro adherence of M. hyopneumoniae to swine cilia. The tracheal cilia are the natural targets to which the mycoplasma binds during in vivo infection. The antibodies are important in the characterization of M. hyopneumoniae isolates by immunoblotting and adherence inhibition, and in purification of M. hyopneumoniae adhesins

Application:
- Veterinary diagnostics
- Vaccine quality control
The cell lines are available for non-exclusive licensing.

Intellectual Property:
Tangible material

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Development Stage:

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Fri, 22 May 2015 13:25:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195752050Fri, 22 May 2015 13:26:32 GMTDescription:]]>Application:- Vaccine quality control
The cell lines are available for non-exclusive licensing.]]>
Intellectual Property:

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNon-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Plant Compounds for Nutraceutical or Pharmaceutical Useshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19384Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified compounds in orangegrass that have anti-inflammatory activity.

Description:
Medicinal plants, such as St. John’s Wort, have received attention as supplements to treat various conditions or to promote general health and well-being.  These plants also represent a valuable resource for the identification of compounds that may have utility as new therapeutic agents.  Hypericum gentianoides, or orangegrass, is a plant native to the eastern half of the United States that was used by Native Americans to treat a variety of disorders, such as fever or wounds.  While investigating the properties of organgegrass, ISU researchers have identified a series of closely related compounds in its extracts that exhibit anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of prostaglandin E synthesis.  These compounds are abundant in orangegrass relative to other secondary metabolites, demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity at low doses, and exhibit low cytotoxicity.  Thus, these natural compounds may have utility as nutraceuticals or as the basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents.

Advantage:
• Effective (doses as low as 1 ug/ml show anti-inflammatory activity)
• Abundant (the bioactive compounds account for approximately 20% of the dry plant tissue or 2% of the fresh tissue)
• Nontoxic (cytotoxicity is not observed at doses with anti-inflammatory activity)
• Versatile (may be used without modification for nutraceutical applications or as the starting point for new drug development)

Application:
Novel Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Topical Use or Drug Development

References:
“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

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Development Stage:
Molecular structure has been identified, and anti-inflammatory activity with limited cytotoxicity has been demonstrated at concentrations as low as 2 micromolar using purified compounds in a bioassay with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mammalian cells.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193843460Mon, 18 May 2015 14:24:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAnti-Inflammatory and Anti-HIV Compositions and Methods of UseUtilityUnited States7,854,94612/129,3915/29/200812/21/20102/24/20295/13/20159/9/2016FalseDifferential ELISA for PRRSV to Distinguish Vaccinated from Infected Animalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19382Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a diagnostic test that can distinguish animals vaccinated for protection against the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from those infected with the virus

Description:
PRRSV is an important pathogen of pigs, and causes hundreds of millions of dollars in losses to pork producers annually in the US alone due to reproductive disorders in sows and respiratory disease in piglets.  Modified live-attenuated vaccines (MLV and ATP) are available to help protect against PRRSV infection, but there are reports of acute PRRSV outbreaks in vaccinated herds with vaccine-like strains of the virus being identified.  This has lead to a need for a rapid assay that can be used for identifying and differentiating these vaccine-like isolates from field isolates of PRRSV.  While commercial diagnostic assays are available for PRRSV, they are unable to differentiate vaccinated animals from those that are naturally infected with the virus, or are too cumbersome and expensive for wide implementation.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based diagnostic assay that distinguishes vaccinated (with MLV) from infected animals.  This assay is based upon antigenic differences in the 2b protein between the commonly used PRRSV vaccine strain and field isolates which can be used as serological markers.  The assay may thus facilitate improved management practices for pork producers.

Advantage:
Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infected

Application:
Veterinary diagnostics

References:
“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

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Development Stage:
An indirect ELISA has been established and shown to distinguish between the PRRSV 2b protein region from vaccine strains and other isolates, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193823371Mon, 18 May 2015 14:23:07 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infectedApplication:

]]>References:“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Differential Immunoassay for PRRS Vaccine AntibodyContinuationUnited States8,541,18813/298,77611/17/20119/24/20131/27/20275/13/201511/30/2016FalseUniversal and Differential Serologic Assay for Influenza A Virushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19381Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a diagnostic assay for swine influenza (Influenza A) that can distinguish between exposed and vaccinated animals. This ELISA-based assay is also able to detect all Influenza A viruses, regardless of subtype. The assay represents an improvement over currently available tests, and may help pork producers in managing this costly disease.

Description:
Swine influenza, or Influenza A, is an acute respiratory disease that can affect pigs of all ages and results in significant economic losses for pork producers. While detection of swine influenza virus (SIV) or viral antigen in the lung or nasal secretions from symptomatic animals is considered the definitive diagnosis of swine influenza, serologic tests are often used to detect animals that have been exposed to the virus since the disease has a very short duration and the virus quickly becomes undetectable. However, interpretation of serologic test results for the diagnosis of SIV is made difficult by the intensive use of vaccination, and the emergence of new subtypes and antigenic drift within a subtype. To address the need for serologic assays for SIV that detect infection regardless of subtype or antigenic variation, as well as the need to differentiate exposed from vaccinated animals, ISU researchers have developed a universal and differential serologic assay for influenza A virus. This ELISA-based assay detects two antigens: one that is conserved among all influenza A viruses, and a second antigen that is expressed in exposed but not vaccinated pigs.

Advantage:
• Comprehensive (the assay detects an antigen conserved among all swine influenza virus subtypes)
• Differential (can distinguish between exposed and vaccinated animals)
• Stable (use of recombinant antigens enables continuous production of reagents)

Application:
Diagnosis of swine influenza (Influenza A)

References:
“Characterization of the humoral immune response of experimentally infected and vaccinated pigs to swine influenza viral proteins”, Won-Il Kim, Wai-Hong Wu, Bruce Janke, and Kyoung-Jin Yoon, 2005, Arch. Viol. DOI: 10.1007/s00705-005-0615-9.

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Development Stage:
The serologic assay has been used to characterize the antibody responses of pigs to SIV antigens, and is ready for additional field evaluation.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193813288Thu, 14 May 2015 12:58:28 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:“Characterization of the humoral immune response of experimentally infected and vaccinated pigs to swine influenza viral proteins”, Won-Il Kim, Wai-Hong Wu, Bruce Janke, and Kyoung-Jin Yoon, 2005, Arch. Viol. DOI: 10.1007/s00705-005-0615-9.

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineUniversal and Differential Serologic Assay for Swine Influenza VirusUtilityUnited States7,892,72911/473,4346/23/20062/22/20116/15/20285/13/20155/13/2015False"Healthy Beef": Fatty Acid Synthase Genetic Markers Associated with a Healthier Fatty Acid Compositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19120Summary:
The amount of saturated and unsaturated fat in meat and dairy products is of significant interest because of their implications for human health, and in particular, the relationship between consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol levels.  ISU researchers have recently developed a genetic marker for identifying cattle that have a more healthful fatty acid composition.

Description:
Research has shown that human consumption of large amounts of saturated fats in foods such as meat can lead to heart disease.  ISU researchers investigating the bovine fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene have recently determined that the percentage of saturated fatty acids and the atherogenic index are associated with small genetic differences in the FAS gene.   Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and a method was developed to identify these genetic markers.  This method has the potential to be a useful tool to genetically predict the fatty acid composition of beef or milk. In addition, the development of improved breeds could be accelerated since young animals can be tested before the meat or milk was harvested.

Advantage:
• Enables accelerated selection of cattle for “heart healthier” meat and dairy products compared to traditional breeding methods.

Application:
Rapid genetic selection of breeding stock with a lower atherogenic index and higher levels of healthier monounsaturated fatty acids

References:
Zhang, S., T. J. Knight, J. M. Reecy, and D. C. Beitz. 2008.  DNA polymorphisms in bovine fatty acid synthase are associated with beef fatty acid composition. Animal Genetics 39:62-70.

Development Stage:
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Commercial feasibility has been demonstrated, and  Iowa State University is seeking partners for non-exclusive licensing of this technology.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:32 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191203499Thu, 07 May 2015 12:09:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers investigating the bovine fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene have recently determined that the percentage of saturated fatty acids and the atherogenic index are associated with small genetic differences in the FAS gene.   Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and a method was developed to identify these genetic markers.  This method has the potential to be a useful tool to genetically predict the fatty acid composition of beef or milk. In addition, the development of improved breeds could be accelerated since young animals can be tested before the meat or milk was harvested.

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:Zhang, S., T. J. Knight, J. M. Reecy, and D. C. Beitz. 2008.  DNA polymorphisms in bovine fatty acid synthase are associated with beef fatty acid composition. Animal Genetics 39:62-70.

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineGenetic Markers in Fatty Acid Synthase for Identification of Meat Product Fatty Acid Content in CattleUtilityUnited States7,910,30812/177,4367/22/20083/22/20117/22/20285/4/20155/4/2015False