Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:03:25 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:03:25 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityCloaking with Footprints: A Novel Technique for Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based Serviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19261Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a novel method for location privacy protection so that location information cannot be directly linked to a particular individual through location-based services.

Description:
Location-based services (LBS) require location information from clients.  However, a person’s whereabouts may reveal sensitive private information, such as health condition or political affiliation.  Moreover, location information may make a person physically vulnerable, for example, to a personal threat.  Potential solutions for location privacy protection, such as using a pseudonym in requesting LBSs, does not protect a user’s anonymity because the location information itself may reveal that person’s real-world identity.  To overcome this challenge, ISU researchers have developed a novel cloaking technique for location privacy protection.  This technique uses a footprint—a user's location sample collected at some time point—to depersonalize a user’s location based on their historical location information and cloaking algorithms.  In addition, while the sizes of cloaking boxes produced by the existing approaches are highly dependent on the network density, footprint cloaking enables computation of a minimized cloaking area.  The existing techniques require all mobile users to report current location information; in contrast, this approach only requires the user who requests LBSs to provide location updates.  This eliminates server processing requirements and network loading.  This approach also enables depersonalization of a user’s trajectory as opposed to currently used methods since a time-series sequence of cloaking boxes forms a trajectory that may reveal the real identity of the user if, for example, it links to the user's home and office.  As a result, footprint cloaking is more practical, scalable and can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs)
• Robust (enables fine cloaking resolution)
• Economical (performance studies have shown lower computation and communications costs

Application:
Location privacy protection

References:
Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype is available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>
Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192613620Wed, 08 Mar 2017 14:42:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesUtilityUnited States8,856,93912/555,4569/8/200910/7/201412/19/20325/8/20152/27/2017Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesDivisionalUnited States9,239,93514/472,4628/29/20141/19/20169/8/20293/8/20173/8/2017FalseActive Noise Control System for Use in Noise Cancelling Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19258Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a system for noise control for use in noise cancelling devices such as headphones.

Description:
Reduction of noise in certain work and other environments is important for communication, safety, preservation of hearing, and for personal comfort.  Noise control using passive headsets generally provides substantial broadband noise reduction, but without the ability to selectively control one frequency of noise over another.  In addition, existing active noise control headsets have been limited to control of only low frequencies (less than 1 KHz) but are not able to reduce high frequency noise due to design limitations.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

Advantage:
• Selective (enables the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining desirable frequencies, such as those used for speech)
• Effective (enables mitigation of high frequency noises)
• Versatile (has utility in a wide variety of noisy environments, such dental offices, airplanes, machine shops and manufacturing facilities)

Application:
Noise control

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
An active noise control system consisting of a headset, speaker, microphone and controller has been developed, and large reductions of high frequency tonal noise have been demonstrated experimentally. 

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192583501Tue, 31 Jan 2017 12:47:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

]]>Advantage:Application:Noise controlStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Active Noise Control SystemUtilityUnited States9,558,73212/189,9678/12/20081/31/201712/2/20351/31/20173/6/2017FalseHigh-number Gene Fragment Assemblyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22741Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that can assembly up to 45 fragments into a full-length gene sequence with only two steps, the assembly step and the PCR step.

Description:
Gene synthesis technology, in contrast to gene engineering, is a method in synthetic biology that is used to create genes de novo. It has become a powerful tool in many fields of recombinant technology including gene therapy, vaccine development and molecular engineering. Current approaches are mostly based on a combination of organic chemistry and molecular biological technique, and requires multiple steps to successfully assembly a full-length gene. For instance, oligonucleotide ligation and PCR-based assembly. Also, the number of DNA fragments in one assembly is always limited to 11 or even less. To solve this problem, ISU researchers have developed an assembly method with the help of the thermodynamic analysis software PICKY created by the same group previously. The assembly method can push the limit up to 45 fragments and only needs two steps in one reaction tube, the assembly step and the PCR step. With this technique, companies can synthesize much longer genes with many fragments using one reaction instead of the tiered assembly scheme. This will improve both the cost and quality of gene synthesis services.

Advantage:
• Allows high number fragments (up to 45) in one assembly reaction
• Able to synthesize longer genes for various follow-up experiments
• Low-cost and high quality gene synthesis service
• Easy to be adapted in the laboratory

Application:
Gene synthesis

Patent:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3554: PICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Tool

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:08:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/227414280Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:12:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 3554: PICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Tool

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Toolhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19385Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a software tool that makes designing oligo probes for microarrays, or gene chips, easier, faster and with the highest quality. It also analyzes existing probes to detect potential cross-hybridization sites for trouble shooting, data analysis improvement or discovery

Description:
DNA microarrays have enabled detailed studies on gene expression, and are used in drug discovery research, comparative genomics, high throughput screening, diagnostics, and other applications.  However, the design of microarrays is crucial for maximizing experimental results.  To facilitate the design of oligonucleotide (oligos) probes used in microarrays, an ISU researcher has developed PICKY, a software tool for selecting optimal oligos.  PICKY allows the rapid and efficient determination of gene-specific oligos based on a given gene set, and can be used for large, complex genomes, such as human, rice or maize. PICKY can also be used to analyze existing microarray probes and evaluate their design quality. Because PICKY uses rigorous whole genome-based thermodynamic screening to identify hydrogen binding sites, it can be utilized for siRNA (short interference RNA) design for gene knockout applications and for discovery of natural miRNA (microRNA) targets. Non-exclusive free licenses are available for the 32-bit version of PICKY; the 64-bit version of PICKY, which allows bigger gene sets to be analyzed, is freely available to nonprofit users using it for non-commercial purposes, but commercial users will need to pay a licensing fee to license 64-bit version of PICKY for commercial use.

Advantage:
• Rapid (gene probes sets can be designed in only minutes or hours compared to other design tools that take days or weeks for some large genomes)
• Accurate (PICKY considers thermodynamics when selecting oligos, not just sequence similarity) 
• Versatile (may be used to design arrays and siRNAs or to analyze the quality of existing arrays)
• Independent (as a stand-alone program that works on all major computing platforms; PICKY does not require any third party software program to operate)

Application:
Microarray design; oligonucleotide probe and primer design; existing microarray re-analysis; siRNA Design

References:
1: “Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY,” H-H Chou, 2010, BMC Bioinformatics 11:196. PMID: 20406469.

2: “Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays,” H-H Chou, A. Trisiriro, S. Park, YI Hsing, PC Ronald, and PS Schnable, 2009, BMC Bioinformatics 10:347. PMID: 19849862.

3: “PICKY: oligo microarray design for large genomes”, Hui-Hsien Chou, An-Ping Hsia, Denise L. Mooney, Patrick S. Schnable, 2004, Bioinformatics 20:2893-2902. PMID: 15180932.

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4280: High-number Gene Fragment Assembly

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
PICKY version 2.20 has been released, and Macintosh, Unix and PC versions are all available (except the Mac 64-bit version, which will be released later).  Free versions and tutorials are available for download.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193853554Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:12:42 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY,” H-H Chou, 2010, BMC Bioinformatics 11:196. PMID: 20406469.

2: “Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays,” H-H Chou, A. Trisiriro, S. Park, YI Hsing, PC Ronald, and PS Schnable, 2009, BMC Bioinformatics 10:347. PMID: 19849862.

3: “PICKY: oligo microarray design for large genomes”, Hui-Hsien Chou, An-Ping Hsia, Denise L. Mooney, Patrick S. Schnable, 2004, Bioinformatics 20:2893-2902. PMID: 15180932.

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF 4280: High-number Gene Fragment Assembly

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseQuorum-based Cycles for Efficient Communication in the Optical Networkshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22541Summary:
ISU researchers developed a novel method to enhance fault tolerance capabilities of cycles in the optical networks based on quorum set theory and light-trails.

Description:
Optical networking is a high-speed communication that consists of multiple transmitters and receivers interconnected by fiber-optic cables. It integrates signals encoded onto light to transmit information among various nodes of a telecommunications networks. However, failures within a network are to be expected and can happened as much as every couple days. Protecting against these optical circuit faults is important and developing new methods with enhanced efficiency and distributed control is in demand. In a distributed system and algorithms, nodes are often grouped into intersection sets referred to as quorum sets to improve efficiency and distribution control. Using the same quorum set theory, ISU researchers found a method to accomplish the efficiency and distributed control in optical network routing. This method applies the distributed efficiency of the quorum sets to routing optical cycles based on light-trail. With this method, unicast and multicast communication requests do not need to be known or even modeled a priori. Furthermore, in the presence of network link faults, >99% average coverage enables the continued operation of nearly all arbitrary unicast and multicast requests in the network.

Advantage:
• Quorum-based cycles show efficiency and distributed control.
• This method is reliable and fault tolerant.
• Supports expected traffic (one-to-one or one-to-many traffic) efficiently.
• Creates fair and efficient resource utilization.

Application:
Optical network

References:
Optical quorum cycles for efficient communication

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 25 Jul 2016 12:54:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/225414426Mon, 25 Jul 2016 12:54:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Optical quorum cycles for efficient communication

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseQuery Authentication and Correction Through Parity Codinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21702Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have proposed a novel solution that uses multiple cloud service providers, which may be potentially untrustworthy, for data management.  Users query the servers for the data of interest and are allowed to perform both authentication and correction.

Description:
This technology associates the original set of data with a set of parity data and then distributes them among a set of cloud servers that are managed independently by different service providers. This can detect if a query result is correct, and correct it if it is not.  This is achieved through simple parity computation, without complex cryptographic techniques, and as such, this technology incurs less overhead in storage, communication, and computation, which benefits all three parties – data owners, data users and service providers.

Advantage:
• Allows both authentication and correction on query results
• Does not rely on cryptographic techniques and reduces query processing time
• Does not require the installation of any additional software on a cloud server
• Can be used for all users of current commercial cloud services from vendors such as DropBox, Amazon, IBM and free cloud services such as Openshift and Heroku Postgress for file management and database management

Application:
The proposed technology can be used for all users of current commercial cloud services.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 14:01:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217024438Thu, 19 May 2016 11:37:08 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseQuerying User-Defined Mathematical Functionshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21857Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new query primitive called Function Object Query (FOQ) that allows users to interpret a database as a collection of mathematical functions and retrieve those whose output under a given function input satisfies certain conditions.

Description:
The FOQ functions, their input, and output condition are all user-defined, making FOQ a powerful vehicle for analytical information retrieval. FOQ is most similar to the existing top-k preference query. A preference query ranks the objects with a preference function where users assign different weights (i.e., their preferences) on different attributes and aggregate the weighted results.

Advantage:
• FOQ allows any complex mathematical functions, which can be linear and non-linear, monotonic and non-monotonic, polynomial and non-polynomial, with no restriction on the input domain.
• An FOQ can be in different forms, including range FOQ (i.e., retrieving the objects whose function outputs are within a certain range), top-k FOQ (i.e., retrieving the objects whose function outputs are among the top k), and k-nearest neighbor (i.e., retrieving the k objects whose function outputs are closest to a certain value).
• Our solutions take advantage of the fact that the intersections of a set of functions partition the input domain into a number of subdomains, and in each of these subdomains, the functions are sortable according to their outputs. This discovery allows us to develop a generic indexing structure for highly efficient processing of FOQs.

Application:
Examples of such applications are plenty, including ranking an object (e.g., universities, movies, jobs)  with user-defined formulas, finding patients with high risk of breast cancer, diabetes and/or Alzheimer’s, customers with minimal financial risk, just to name a few.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 05 May 2016 13:14:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218574404Thu, 05 May 2016 13:32:25 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Softwarehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19250Summary: Iowa State University researchers have developed a modeling approach for Simulink diagrams that can be used for further analysis such as test generation and formal verification.

Description:
Simulink is a commercial tool for graphical representation and simulation of dynamic systems, and Simulink/Stateflow (S/S) diagrams can be used to capture time or event-driven dynamics.  Simulation of S/S diagrams can be use to generate sample runs for validation. Further validation can be performed through testing, verification and monitoring, with automated testing, verification and monitoring desirable.  However, current approaches for modeling S/S diagrams in a format amenable to automatic test generation, verification and monitoring are inadequate.  To overcome this limitation, ISU researchers have developed a modeling approach for an industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow diagrams using input/output extended finite automata (I/O-EFA), which is a formal model amenable for analysis.  The input-output behavior of an I/O-EFA model, as defined in terms of a step-trajectory, preserves the input-output behavior of the corresponding Simulink/Stateflow diagram at each sample time.  This approach is recursive and modular that models atomic blocks and recursively and modularly combines such blocks for forming models of more complex Simulink/Stateflow diagrams from the simpler ones.  The modeling approach has utility for automated test generation, verification or monitoring for fault-detection of embedded software developed using Simulink/Stateflow diagrams, or other similar simulation tools such as LabView.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution


Advantage:
• Efficient (modeling is recursive and modular)
• Effective  (amenable to automated test generation for comprehensive coverage such as MCDC or comprehensive verification, monitoring, and fault-detection)
• Versatile (can be applied to industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow)
• Precise (precisely preserves the discrete-time semantics)

References:

Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
This modeling approach is available for testing

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192503739Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:14:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution

]]>Advantage:References:Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Semantic Translation of Time-Driven Simulink Diagrams Using Input/Output Extended Finite AutomataUtilityUnited States8,655,63613/165,9076/22/20112/18/20143/8/20325/8/20156/21/2017Semantic Translation of Stateflow Diagrams into Input/Output Extended Finite Automata and Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow DiagramsCIPUnited States8,849,62613/538,4726/29/20129/30/201411/2/20315/8/20152/27/2017FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21069Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210694135Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21068Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210683958Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMethod and Apparatus for Computing Time Decayed Aggregates over Asynchronous Streamshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21056Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a technique for processing massive data streams.   The patents are available for non-exclusive license.

Description:
This invention is a new technique for processing massive data streams. It overcomes the need to store data within the main memory of a computer (or even on a disk) in order to process the data.   Rather than storing data, this “real-time” method uses time decay functions to prioritize processing order by assigning weights based on the age of the data. Decay functions such as sliding windows and exponential decay have been studied under the assumption of well-ordered arrivals, i.e., data arrives in the order of increasing time stamps. However, data quality issues are prevalent in massive streams, due to asynchrony, delays or possibly features inherent to the measurement process, and correct order of arrival cannot be guaranteed.  This new methodology overcomes many of these problems.

Advantage:
• Improves accuracy and performance of data transmission

Application:
Data processing, computation of stream aggregates

References:
IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:02:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210563609Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:02:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:IEEE International Conference on Data Engineering, Cancun, MexicoStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Computing Time-Decayed Aggregates under Smooth Decay FunctionsUtilityUnited States8,484,26912/006,3331/2/20087/9/20135/10/203212/7/20152/27/2017Computing Time-Decayed Aggregates in Data StreamsUtilityUnited States8,391,16412/006,3381/2/20083/5/20131/5/203212/7/20152/27/2017Computing Time-Decayed Aggregates in Data StreamsContinuationUnited States8,908,55413/755,6211/31/201312/9/20142/1/202812/7/20152/27/2017Computing Time-Decayed Aggregates under Smooth Decay FunctionsContinuationUnited States9,170,98413/850,4383/26/201310/27/20159/12/202812/7/20152/27/2017FalseComputer-Aided Tap Tester (CATT) for Inspection of Composite and Metal Honeycomb Structureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19491Description:
This technology is an instrumented tap test system that provides quantitative, image-based data regarding the mechanical properties of an inspection area. Driven by a laptop PC, the system produces two dimensional images (or "C-scans") that reveal flaws, damages, repairs and substructures in complex bonded structures such as metal honeycomb sandwiches and composite structures. It produces images of the local stiffness of the component, and the stiffness derived from the tap test was shown to agree with that obtained by static load tests. The instrument generates images that reveal the percent reduction in stiffness due to flaws or damage. It has utility in safety inspections for airlines and other industries, as well as application in quality assurance during fabrication.

Advantage:
• Image-based results - improves on earlier tap test methods and instruments that do not have imaging capability.
• Cost-effective.
• Quantitative stiffness data that are structurally meaningful.
• Simple operation with minimal training - no calibration standards required and test results independent of operator.
• High portability - driven by a laptop PC without need of external AC power.
• Manual and mechanized data collection.

Application:
1. Non-destructive testing and inspection of manufacturing-related or service-induced defects, flaws and damages in composite and metal honeycomb structures. 2. Aircraft manufacturers, composite components manufacturers and users, nondestructive instrumentation manufacturers 3. Safety inspections for airlines and other industries; quality control during fabrication of composite structures.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Advanced prototype is complete and available for demonstration. The prototype is expected to require very little development to be brought to market. The manual version had gone through field tests at three airlines and three military bases, and the system is undergoing beta-site tests at American Airlines in Tulsa, OK. The mechanized version is being completed and has also gone through some field tests.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194912592Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:54:13 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Non-Destructive Inspections and the Display of Inspection ResultsUtilityUnited States6,327,92109/517,9573/3/200012/11/20013/3/20205/19/20155/19/2015FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBandwidth Recycling for More Efficient Data Transmissionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19267Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed scheduling algorithms to employ unused bandwidth to improve broadband network efficiency.

Description:
The explosion in the use of the Internet and the need to transfer multimedia data has lead to increasing requirements being placed on communications networks.  Bandwidth, which can be a limited and valuable resource, must be managed efficiently to provide high quality services to users (QoS).  A variety of approaches have been used to meet the demands for QoS while simultaneously providing diversified traffic services, including reservation protocols, traffic shaping, scheduling algorithms, and congestion avoidance.  However, most of these approaches require predicting the amount of incoming traffic, which is difficult to do since video streaming, VoIP, etc. generate data at variable rates. To provide a high QoS, subscriber stations are required to request the needed bandwidth from base stations prior to any transmission of data; subscriber stations often keep reserved bandwidth—even when it is more than the data transmitted—and thus some bandwidth may be wasted.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a network protocol to employ unused bandwidth to improve network efficiency through bandwidth recycling.  This approach utilizes scheduling algorithms to increase the probability of successful recycling.  Since bandwidth recycling does not change the existing bandwidth reservation, it maintains the QoS guarantee and does not introduce any extra delay in data transmission.  In addition, simulation results have demonstrated the potential for bandwidth recycling to improve network throughput by 40%. This technology has utility for any 4G broadband wireless network.

Advantage:
• Accurate (obviates the need for traffic prediction)
• Efficient (wasted bandwidth can be utilized immediately to improve network throughput)
• Economical (bandwidth recycling introduces limited overhead)
• Versatile (enhances QoS for both WiMax and LTE networks)

Application:
Communications networks

References:
1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Simulation results demonstrate that bandwidth recycling can improve network throughput by 40% and decrease data latency, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 14:16:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192673804Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:48:42 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Bandwidth Recycling in NetworksUtilityUnited States8,737,42913/084,7044/12/20115/27/201411/1/20325/7/20158/25/2017FalseInterferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switchinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19138Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an optical switch capable of submicrosecond switching that may help meet the growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications.

Description:
Demand for optical data and communication networks continues to grow, and as a consequence, so does the need for high speed, high bandwidth switching technologies.  The development of all optical switching technologies has seen increased focus to help meet performance demands and the need for ultrafast signal processing. Magneto-optical switches have been investigated for optical switching applications because of their low insertion loss and ability to be integrated into optical systems.  However, magneto-optical switches have previously had slow switching times, on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an interferometric fiber switch which utilizes a magneto-optic Faraday rotator (MOFR). This system uses generation of a magnetic field via a magnetic pulse circuit to achieve high speed switching, on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. As a consequence, this optical switch may have utility for applications such as fiber-optic communications.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

Advantage:
• High speed (capable of switching speeds on the order of 100 ns)
• High stability (Sagnac configuration allows short path length and matched interferometric paths)
• Versatile (switch may either have a latching or nonlatching configuration)

Application:
Fiber optics communications; high capacity data networks

References:
“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

 

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:22 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191383977Tue, 18 Aug 2015 13:43:45 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Advanced Drive Circuitry for Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States9,110,31713/440,3554/5/20128/18/20153/1/20348/18/20152/27/2017FalseStanding Wave Axial Nanometry (SWAN) for Superresolution Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19669Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have an approach for performing 3-D measurements of single molecules with nanometer accuracy and precision.

Description:
Despite its importance as a research tool for understanding cellular functions, the optical resolution of light microscopy has imposed limitations on observing and measuring cellular components and structures. The advent of superresolution microscopy techniques, which enable imaging of nanostructures and processes at X-Y resolutions of approximately 20 nm, opens new opportunities for exploring cell biology and has many other applications.  However, current superresolution microscopy approaches may have limitations with respect to whether live or fixed cells can be imaged because of image acquisition and processing speed, and may also have limitations in terms of resolution along the Z axis.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new technique call SWAN (standing wave axial nanometry) for determining the axial location of nanoscale fluorescent objects with sub-nanometer accuracy and several nanometer precision.  Unlike other approaches, SWAN does not require custom optics or specially engineered substrates, which makes it easy to use with biological samples and live cells. SWAN can be easily integrated with other super-resolution and super-accuracy techniques to image with nanometer resolution along the lateral and axial directions.  As a consequence, this approach has broad utility for a variety of applications, such as life science research (e.g., biomolecular interactions, structure-function studies, cell imaging), drug discovery (e.g., direct observation of targeted drug delivery and drug interactions in vitro and in living cells and tissues), nanotechnology (e.g., characterization of nanoscale materials), material science (characterization of materials with novel optical properties), and optical MEMs devices by improving their efficiency through more accurate and precise imaging.

Advantage:
• Can be used with biological materials and living cells
• Extends working range
• Enables imaging with nanometer resolution along lateral and axial directions
• Does not require custom optics
• Can be used for single molecule AFM force measurement

Application:
Imaging for life sciences research, drug discovery, nanotechnology, materials science and optical MEMS devices.

References:
“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Proof-of-concept and utility has been demonstrated by using SWAN to measure the orientation of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths that were tethered to surfaces with different functionalities.  Commercialization partners are being sought for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196694045Wed, 12 Aug 2015 07:52:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and PrecisionUtilityUnited States9,103,78414/081,52211/15/20138/11/201511/15/20338/12/20152/27/2017FalseAn All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19292Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an optical on-off switch that can meet the fast switching demands required by high speed communications systems.

Description:
Fiber-based networks have been used to meet demand for ever increasing bandwidth, and fast switching is required to fully utilize the available bandwidth of the fiber. A variety of switching technologies have been developed to try and achieve fast and reliable switching, including optical micromechanical systems (MEMS)-based switching using silicon technologies, thermal optical switching, electro-optic switching, and acousto-optic switching. However, MEMs and thermo-optic switches suffer from slow (millisecond) switching times, while electro-optic switches have fast (nanosecond) switching times, but suffer from high insertion losses (~ 9 dB). Acousto-optic switches have microsecond switching times, but have insertion losses on the order of 6 dB. To overcome these disadvantages, ISU researchers have developed an all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch based on Faraday rotation of polarized light as it passes through a magneto-optical material. This switch has been demonstrated to have a switching time of 2 microseconds and an insertion loss of 4.8 dB. Because the required external magnetic field is low, the switch also has a simple design and be constructed using a fast solenoid for the drive circuit and a single magneto-optic block as the Faraday rotator

Advantage:
• Eliminates optical-electronic-optical conversions 
• Decreases switching time compared to MEMs and thermo-optic switches
• Reduces material costs through simple design

Application:
Fiber optic communications; data networks

References:
Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
An all fiber magneto-optical switch has been designed and demonstrated to have a switching time of about 2 microseconds.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 12:24:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192923192Tue, 02 Jun 2015 07:30:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702]]>Group:ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,555,17711/733,8554/11/20076/30/20096/30/20175/8/20158/15/2017An All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsCIPUnited States7,916,98212/112,2664/30/20083/29/201112/27/20275/8/20156/2/2017FalseLogic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19262Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a logic element architecture that simplifies generic logic chain operations and improves the functionality of each logic element in programmable devices.

Description:
Reconfigurable fabrics are an important element of reconfigurable computing—systems architecture that offer both performance and flexibility for a broad range of applications—and typically depend on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) which contain programmable logic that allows them to be configured by the designer or customer after manufacturing.  However, compared with application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC), FPGA have lower performance and require increased power consumption.  To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

Advantage:
• Effective (enables carry chain reuse, improving design performance at minimal cost)
• Robust (increases maximum clock frequency by 47% in technology map experiments while reducing utilized routing resources by 13%)
• Efficient (avoids the use of extraneous interconnects since only one wire is needed compared to approaches that require a standard carry chain connection and an additional connection between logic elements)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The logic element architecture is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192623630Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

]]>Advantage:References:“Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

]]>Group:ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devicesUtilityUnited States8,438,52212/237,0769/24/20085/7/20133/17/20315/7/20153/6/2017FalseCharacterizing and Fingerprinting Digital Communication Devices for Improved Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19313Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a method for monitoring the communication signature of digital communication devices that can be used for authentication and other security applications.

Description:
The proliferation of digital communications devices and wireless access points has lead to increasing security concerns; these security concerns generally fall under the areas of digital forensics, intrusion detection, and authentication. However, strategies for mitigating these concerns are often inadequate or create a significant administrative overhead burden, such as managing the use of passwords or private keys that are later verified as part of traditional authentication approaches.  To address these concerns, ISU researchers have developed a method of monitoring the communications signature of digital communications devices. These signatures act like voiceprints of the device, allowing it to be uniquely identified.  In addition, the voiceprints can be stored for either online, in-situ identification or for offline analysis. Online, the voiceprints can be used to detect intruders who are either tapping a digital communication device or changing network hardware so as to gain unauthorized access. Offline, the voiceprints are useful for forensic purposes such as proving that a given digital communication device was used in an attack. This technology also has potential for use in wireless network adapters, smart cards, and RFID tags.

Advantage:
• Versatile (enables physical authentication of a variety of digital communication devices)
• Protective (can be used forensically to track hackers and authorized users through the voiceprints they leave behind)

Application:
Authentication of communications devices on computers on networks; forensic analysis of digital communications devices; authentication of Smart Cards, RFID tags, and wireless network adaptors.

References:
Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The method has been demonstrated experimentally to enable Ethernet devices to be uniquely identified and tracked, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193133130Wed, 13 May 2015 12:40:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fingerprinting Digital Devices Using Electromagnetic Characteristics of their CommunicationsUtilityUnited States7,639,80611/087,3653/23/200512/29/200910/29/20285/8/20155/5/2017FalseCooperative Spatial Multiplexing for Wireless Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19308Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna

Description:
Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.

Advantage:
• Requires only one antenna
• Wireless terminal is small and lightweight
• Application in high data rate transmissions

Application:
Wireless data communications

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193083139Wed, 13 May 2015 12:03:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cooperative Spatial MultiplexingUtilityUnited States8,345,69311/405,8584/18/20061/1/201311/26/20305/8/20152/27/2017FalseObserver Based Q Control for Scanning Probe Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19304Summary:
Method for decreasing the cantilever damping coefficient resulting in increased resolution in atomic force miscroscopy

Description:
Examination of the surface properties of inorganic and biological materials at the molecular level can be performed using atomic force microscopy. In atomic force microscopy, the desired bandwidth or resolution can be achieved by active quality factor, or Q, control. Currently used Q control methods result in a trade-off between resolution and bandwidth. To simultaneously improve both bandwidth and resolution, ISU researchers have developed an observer-based Q control method that enables the cantilever to behave like a mass-spring-damper system. This method overcomes difficulties encountered in currently used active Q-control systems that are incurred when the damping coefficient of the cantilever increases, resulting in decreased resolution when damping occurs in air, or reduced scan speed when the cantilever is controlled under fluids.

Advantage:
• Detects high bandwidth content of sample features
• High probability for detecting small sample features
• Increases flexibility: improves resolution when the cantilever is operated in air 
• increases scan speed when the cantilever is operated under fluids

Application:
Atomic force microscopy; scanning probe microscopy

References:
“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Observer-based Q control has been shown experimentally to increase bandwidth content features of samples while preserving resolution

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193043299Wed, 13 May 2015 11:57:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Observer Based Q-Control Imaging Methods for Atomic Force MicroscopyUtilityUnited States7,627,43811/796,2054/27/200712/1/20097/19/20275/8/20158/15/2017FalseEnergy-Extraction-Based Active Noise Control Systemhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19299Summary:
Reduction of noise in vehicles, machinery, buildings or other structures is highly desirable, but difficult to achieve because of the complex physical interactions involved.  ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system with potential applications in a variety of industries, such as aircraft, home appliances, automobiles and machinery

Description:
Suppressing noise in home and work environments, such as in buildings, vehicles, engines, appliances, or machinery, is important for comfort and health reasons.  One approach to active noise control is to use adaptive disturbance cancellation techniques. However, effective noise control is hard to accomplish because analytical models for acoustic-structure interactions are difficult to obtain and significant modeling uncertainties persist.  To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

Advantage:
• Reduces noise generated from both structural and acoustic sources
• Achieves uniform broadband reduction in noise and vibration

Application:
Reduction of noise and vibration in acoustic structures for industries such as aircraft, home appliances, engines, and industrial machinery.

References:
“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192993045Wed, 13 May 2015 11:51:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.
]]>
Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise controlUtilityUnited States7,623,99310/731,74212/9/200311/24/200911/27/20265/8/20155/5/2017False1+N Protection for Mesh Networks Using Network Coding on Protection Cycleshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19305Summary:
Optical fiber failures can result in disruptions in communication networks. ISU researchers have developed a technique to provide transparent non-stop service in communication networks while efficiently utilizing resources.

Description:
The advent of optical fibers in communication network backbones has allowed large amounts of bandwidth to be carried on a single fiber. Failure of single fiber, which is not an uncommon occurrence, can therefore affect large numbers of users and connections. Preserving the ability of a network to operate, or network survivability, is thus critical if any part of the network should fail. Current methods for providing optical network survivability include predesigned protection (i.e., 1+1, where a single session is protected by duplicating the resources required by the session) and dynamic restoration (i.e., 1:N, where resources for a single session are shared among N sessions). While 1+1 protection techniques are nearly instantaneous, they require duplication of resources. 1:N techniques are more efficient, since resources for a single session are shared between N sessions. However, these methods are also slower and require management and control planes involvement, since detection of the failure, and determining which session should use the backup facilities are necessary. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a 1+N protection technique for mesh networks that uses network coding on protection cycles. This method is similar to the 1+1, except that one backup circuit is shared between N sessions, and data from all N sessions is transmitted on the backup circuit. The use of the network coding technique results in significants saving over the 1+1 method, while using roughly the same resources required by the 1:N method, but at the speed of the 1+1 method.

Advantage:
• Transparent protection against single link failures.
• Fast protection since no failure detection or switching is involved.
• Reduced bandwidth and resource requirements, since multiple communication sessions use the same resources required to protect a single session.
• Simpler control and management planes.
• Can be implemented at a number of layers.
• Error detection and correction.

Application:
Communications networks

References:
Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Method demonstrated in the laboratory

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193053400Tue, 12 May 2015 07:07:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-47401+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using P-Cycles and Protection PathsUtilityUnited States7,869,34412/323,59811/26/20081/11/20113/11/20295/8/20155/8/2015FalseImproved Robot and Stepper Motor Controlshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19306Summary:
ISU researchers have developed robot and stepper motor control software that contributes to the improved operation of robots

Description:
The Bouton-McConnell Stepper Motor Controller for Vibration-Free Fast Response, involves control techniques that permit stepper motors to behave like closed loop DC motors when implemented using  Robust Vibration Suppression (RVS) control techniques. This control technique enhances noise suppression and can achieve high speeds without sacrificing the control of residual vibrations. It can be applied to currently operating stepper motor systems.

Advantage:
• Robust (minimally affected by system operating dynamics)
• Fast (robot response time is minimized)
• Quiet (permits broad band noise suppression)
• Versatile (can be applied to a variety of control systems)

Application:
Robotic controls; stepper motor control

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
This technology has been applied to a flexible robot arm that moves a large distance in the range of 90 to 180 degrees using a minimal amount of time

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193061832Mon, 11 May 2015 12:10:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsUtilityUnited States6,002,23208/912,2838/15/199712/14/19998/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsContinuationUnited States6,011,37309/303,4624/30/19991/4/20008/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017FalseContext Sensitive Real-Time Data-Driven Music Algorithmshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19311Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a set of algorithms for creating music based on real time data.  This approach allows aural information to be combined with visual cueing to enhance data analysis.

Description:
We live in a world filled with sound and receive a wide range of information aurally. By adding this information to our visual cueing, we more fully understand our environment. Sound directs our viewing and adds essential contextual information.  Because of this, numerous efforts to sonify data—represent data with sound—have been performed.  However, these efforts have mapped data directly to various aspects of sound, causing a result that is difficult to understand or irritating to listen to.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a musical approach to the sonification of data.  Because music can convey a large amount of information, it can enable users to perceive more facets of the data.  This method includes the use of context sensitive grammars, fractal algorithms, and atonal compositional techniques with the result that the music builds in listenability and flexibility for broad applicability to different types of data without external intervention by the composer.  This approach also provides a connection between micro- and macro-scales of the data, thus allowing the user to fully experience its intricacies and interrelationships.  Potential applications of this technique include ambient awareness, exploration of large complex data sets for scientific research and engineering design, augmentation of remote control of tractors or other working machinery, enhancement of viewing of websites or museum displays, use as a composition tool for creating music for performance, and providing an additional information channel during crowd surveillance or other visual targeting/surveillance activities.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with diverse types of data sets)
• Flexible (use of atonal compositional techniques requires less rigid syntax than tonal music and enables real-time sonification)
• Listenable (musical approach creates pleasing aural results)

Application:
Sonfication of data for enhanced analysis and understanding.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A simulation is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193113074Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Creating Realtime Data-Driven Music Using Context Sensitive Grammars and Fractal AlgorithmsUtilityUnited States7,304,22810/985,30111/10/200412/4/200711/10/20245/8/20155/8/2015FalseUtilizing Timing Error Detection and Recovery to Dynamically Improve Superscalar Processor Performance: SPRIT3Ehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19301Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that enables modern high performance computer processors to operate reliably at speeds higher than previously possible.

Description:
Modern processors (and in fact all synchronous logic circuits) use a clock to control execution of the circuit. The speed of this clock, which in large part determines how quickly the processor runs applications, is traditionally limited by worst case delay. The resulting propagation delay is difficult to determine precisely for three main reasons. First, variations induced when computer chips are produced create variable delays in the chips. Second, variations in environmental conditions during operation, such as temperature and voltage, affect the delay through the circuit. Finally, although it is possible to find the longest paths through the logic, it is not known how often the input combinations given during operation will use these paths. To avoid timing errors, traditional design assumes worst case values for these factors, giving an overly high delay estimate, and causing the clock period to be set too slow. To overcome this limitation and increase clock speed, ISU researchers have developed SPRIT3E (Superscalar PeRformance Improvement Through Tolerating Timing Errors). By applying fault tolerance combined with dynamic control theory, this technique performs error detection and correction, and allows clock speeds to scale farther, which in turn lets applications finish earlier. In addition, this method may be applied to any modern processor, since the limitation it overcomes is applicable to all synchronous logic circuits.

Advantage:
• Enables processors to reliably execute applications faster than previously possible
• Performs both error detection and correction (unlike the closest competitor, which performs only error avoidance)
• May be applied to any modern processor, since it overcomes the limitation of the worst case delay assumption that places a minimum on the clock period of modern digital circuits

Application:
High performance processor design; synchronous logic circuit design

 

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:35:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193013421Fri, 08 May 2015 15:35:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Superscale Processor Performance Enhancement Through Reliable Dynamic Clock Frequency TuningUtilityUnited States7,671,62712/107,4154/22/20083/2/20104/22/20285/8/20156/21/2017FalseREBEL: REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic for Cyber Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19260Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new method for ensuring the security of computer-generated transactions.

Description:
The pervasion of computer-based transactions in every day life has led to an increased need for cryptography to ensure that cyber transactions are secure.  Classical methods for encryption/decryption, such as asymmetric RSA encryption/decryption or symmetric block ciphers (for example, NIST standard AES), can take tens of millions of computing cycles that slow the speed of data encryption/decryption.  In addition, these systems also suffer from security vulnerabilities through the use of S-boxes, where public knowledge of S-box constants allows for an adversary to develop static statistical models to exploit them.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

Advantage:
• Rapid (provides encryption and decryption at data rates 10-20 times higher than currently used methods) 
• Secure (S-boxes are not used so the system is not vulnerable to attack mediated by static statistical models)
• Versatile (can be included in hardware in embedded processors used in devices such as cell phones, smart cards (ATM cards), wireless routers, etc.)

Application:
Cyber security; Cryptography

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Data encryption at rates in the vicinity of 128 Gigabits/second has been demonstrated, and security guarantees make the probability of a successful breach near random—many times more secure than the current AES standard.  A computer simulation is available for demonstration.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192603404Fri, 08 May 2015 14:56:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description: ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Reconfigurable Block Encryption LogicUtilityUnited States8,824,67212/101,4114/11/20089/2/20148/2/20315/7/20159/13/2017FalseImproved Eddy Current Coil Design for Nondestructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19209Summary:
Researchers have developed an improved design and method for making eddy current coils that are used in eddy current sensing probes for nondestructive testing.

Description:
Eddy current sensing has been a staple in techniques used for nondestructive evaluation of critical components such as air frames or engine parts. Coils used for eddy current sensing probes have traditionally been formed by hand by winding a wire a number of times around a core.  However, this approach to forming coils leads to variations in number of turns in a coil, spacing between the turns, and alignment of turns on the core, resulting in high variability in the coils and the eddy current sensing probes.  The significant variability of eddy current probe sensitivity has been recognized as an important issue for decades, and yet no satisfactory resolution has been found to date.  To address this issue, Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved eddy current coil design and fabrication procedure in which the coil is formed through depositing film traces. This process is amenable to machine manufacturing and provides more precision and uniformity in the coils, thus reducing their performance variability.  In addition, this method may enable the manufacture of probes that are smaller and more sensitive, and may be used for probes that have a single coil or a sensor array.

Advantage:
• Consistent (probes fabricated from these coils will give highly reproducible results)
• Simple (fabrication method is amenable to automation and avoids tedious forming by hand)
• Versatile (probe elements of various sizes can be produced)

Application:
Nondestructive evaluation

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192093062Thu, 07 May 2015 14:36:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Forming Coil for Use in Eddy Current Sensing ProbeUtilityUnited States7,795,86311/064,3252/23/20059/14/20104/12/20285/7/20159/15/2017FalseTMM Photonic Softwarehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19244Summary:
Researchers have developed a new software package for calculating 3D photonic crystal structures that is highly efficient.

Description:
Photonic crystals have many potential applications in areas such as optoelectronics.  However, while modeling tools are available for facilitating the development of practical photonic crystal technology, existing algorithms suffer from drawbacks that include memory limitations, slow computation speeds and cumbersome user interfaces.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new software package for modeling photonic crystal-based structures that is based on planewave-based TMM (transfer matrix method) and an interpolation algorithm, and is integrated with regression methods.  This software package has computation times that are much faster than existing TMM, FDTD (finite difference time domain) and RCWA (rigorous coupled-wave analysis) algorithms, has an easy to use interface, and is able to model a wide variety of significant photonic crystal structures, including layer-by-layer “woodpile” structures, metallic complex structures, photonic crystal waveguides, and photonic crystal cavities. In addition, the software package is available in versions appropriate for single CPU computers to super computers.  This software may thus have utility for simulating and identifying new structures for photonic crystals with specific characteristics that can be used as platforms for future photonic devices.

Advantage:
• Rapid (computation speed is much faster than that for existing algorithms
• Comprehensive (enables modeling of a wide variety of photonic crystal structures
• User-friendly (interface makes software package easy to run)
• Flexible (versions for single computers, computer clusters and/or super computers are available)

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The software is available for demonstration and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192443336Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseControl Algorithm for Rapid, Broadband Measurement of Nanomechanical Properties in Hardness Testinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19124Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a control algorithm that may reduce the time required to obtain measurements for hardness testing.

Description:
Indentation hardness testing is performed to determine the hardness of a material to deformation.  With the advent of nanotechnology and the need to examine material properties at smaller and smaller scales, new techniques are being developed to measure mechanical properties on very small scales.  For example, hardness testing using microindentation tests employ forces of about 2 N and indentations of about 50 µm, while nanoindentation tests, which use small loads and tip sizes, result in indentations that are very small (only a few square micrometers or nanometers).  Despite the growing interest in image analysis and automated indentation reading in hardness testing, however, current approaches for measurement are limited in the frequency range that can be measured and the time duration required for measurement for materials whose properties change with time (for example, during rapid-stage crystallization of polymers).  To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed a control-integrated optimal design input approach that utilizes inversion-based iterative learning control to apply a precise excitation force on the sample under analysis. This approach allows determination of the optimal excitation force profile that should be applied in indentation-based nanomechanical measurements in order to maximize the measurement frequency range. As a consequence, this technology may enable rapid, broadband measurement of nanomechanical properties during the dynamic evolution of soft samples, such as during the cell fusion process or during rapid polymer crystallization.

Advantage:
• Rapid (reduces measurement time)
• Efficient (minimizes the number of frequency components needed)
• Broadband (maximizes frequency measurement range)

Application:
Materials analysis

References:
“Optimal input design for indentation-based rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy: poly(dimethylsiloxane) example”,  Xu, A. and Q. Zou. 2011. American Control Conference, June 29-July 1, San Franscico, CA.

Development Stage:
Stage3.png
The utility of the control-integrated optimal input design approach has been demonstrated experimentally using the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191243914Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Optimal input design for indentation-based rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy: poly(dimethylsiloxane) example”,  Xu, A. and Q. Zou. 2011. American Control Conference, June 29-July 1, San Franscico, CA.

]]>Development Stage:Stage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Optimal Excitation Force Design Indentation-Based Rapid Broadband Nanomechanical SpectroscopyUtilityUnited States8,590,06113/425,4563/21/201211/19/20133/21/20325/4/20157/19/2017FalseMethod and System for Manufacturing an Article Using Portable Hand-Held Toolshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19123Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for avoiding manufacturing mistakes by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools that are used during assembly.

Description:
During various manufacturing steps, such as assembly, welding, and painting, it is often necessary for a worker to use a hand-held tool.  However, it can be difficult, if not impossible, for a worker to consistently duplicate exact work from one assembly to another assembly.  For example, assembly lines often require many threaded fasteners to be assembled using a torque gun at a single workstation.  While currently used control systems can count the number of times the torque gun reaches the required torque value, they cannot determine if all the fasteners were tightened, or if some were tightened twice, or if the fasteners were tightened in a specific sequence, leading to the possibility of manufacturing mistakes.  To overcome this drawback, researchers have developed a method and system that not only can determine whether a particular manufacturing operation is carried out, but also determine whether the operation was carried out at the correct location and/or in the correct sequence. The system also provides feedback about the task completion status and the quality of the finished product.

Advantage:
• Detects and prevents mistakes during the manufacturing process by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools in real time and providing feedback in the event that the manufacturing process is not proceeding as prescribed.

Application:
Manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:

Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191233594Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:ManufacturingPatent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAdvanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19133Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a tool for simplification of designing and assessing complex parts, termed Advanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS). 

Description:
Current  interfaces used for conceptual design complex products suffer from difficult to use interfaces, unnecessary inputs, and inability to handle the large amount of uncertainty present at this early stage of product design; moreover, these interfaces allow engineers to only investigate a small number of designs before moving onto more detailed phases of design.  To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed ASDS, which can be used for initial product conceptualization with user-friendly interface that allows concepts to be created and assessed in minutes with a set of tools to compute center of gravity, tipping angle, wheel loading, and measurements.  In addition, full CAD models can be decimated and imported into ASDS for conceptual manipulation.  ASDS also includes a virtual reality component in which engineers and designers can view concepts in full immersive, stereoscopic 3D.

Advantage:
• Easy to use interface
• Pre-processed CAD files can be imported to evaluation and conceptualization
• Enables design concepts to be viewed in immersive VR environment
• Minimal expertise needed for use

Application:
Manufacturing; product lifecycle management

Development Stage:
Stage4.png
ASDS is ready for commercialization, and ISU is seeking licensees for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191334006Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:Manufacturing; product lifecycle managementDevelopment Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740False