Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:06:22 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:06:22 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityLinearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19246Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed fabrication methods for a polarized thermal emitter than can be used to create more efficient thermophotovoltaic devices for power generation.

Description:
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices can be used to generate power from photons, and consist of a thermal emitter and photodiode.  These devices can be used to help overcome limitations of photovoltatic (PV) devices solar cells—since sunlight is composed of many different wavelengths, not all incident photons have an energy larger than the energy band gap (Eg) of the semiconducting material of the photodiode and thus, not all photons can contribute to the photo-current.  If the thermal emitter of a TPV can absorb all incoming photons without discrimination and re-emit photons within a narrow range of energy that is optimized for the Eg of the photodiode, in principle, all energy carried by the incident photons can contribute for electricity generation, which leads results in enhanced energy conversion efficiency.  While thermal radiation from a thermal source is usually unpolarized, a class of micro-structures termed polarized thermal emitters can emit polarized thermal radiation; polarized thermal emitters avoid the energy loss usually incurred by filtering because they preferentially emit photons via their structural anisotropy, and thus can improve the efficiency of TPVs.  ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have now fabricated layer-by-layer photonic crystals that can be used for linearly polarized thermal emission.  This thermal emitter in conjunction with a sub-wavelength grating shows properties that are desirable for polarized thermal emitters for TPVs, including a high extinction ratio and high emissivity.  In addition, the emission range can be tuned by controlling the periodicity of the sub-wavelength grating.  The linearly polarized thermal emitter may thus have utility for improving the efficiency of TPVs used for power generation.

Advantage:
• Highly polarized thermal emission available at normal emergence
• High thermal radiation power
• Tunable emission range

References:
“Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

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Development Stage:
The photonic crystals used to create the polarized thermal emitter have been demonstrated to enable control of both spectral emissivity and polarization in thermal radiation, and samples are available for testing. ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192463583Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:33:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

]]>Group:ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals for Linearly-Polarized Thermal Emission and Thermophotovoltaic Device Including SameUtilityUnited States9,400,21912/754,6574/6/20107/26/20164/8/20339/13/20162/27/2017FalseCloaking with Footprints: A Novel Technique for Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based Serviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19261Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a novel method for location privacy protection so that location information cannot be directly linked to a particular individual through location-based services.

Description:
Location-based services (LBS) require location information from clients.  However, a person’s whereabouts may reveal sensitive private information, such as health condition or political affiliation.  Moreover, location information may make a person physically vulnerable, for example, to a personal threat.  Potential solutions for location privacy protection, such as using a pseudonym in requesting LBSs, does not protect a user’s anonymity because the location information itself may reveal that person’s real-world identity.  To overcome this challenge, ISU researchers have developed a novel cloaking technique for location privacy protection.  This technique uses a footprint—a user's location sample collected at some time point—to depersonalize a user’s location based on their historical location information and cloaking algorithms.  In addition, while the sizes of cloaking boxes produced by the existing approaches are highly dependent on the network density, footprint cloaking enables computation of a minimized cloaking area.  The existing techniques require all mobile users to report current location information; in contrast, this approach only requires the user who requests LBSs to provide location updates.  This eliminates server processing requirements and network loading.  This approach also enables depersonalization of a user’s trajectory as opposed to currently used methods since a time-series sequence of cloaking boxes forms a trajectory that may reveal the real identity of the user if, for example, it links to the user's home and office.  As a result, footprint cloaking is more practical, scalable and can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs)
• Robust (enables fine cloaking resolution)
• Economical (performance studies have shown lower computation and communications costs

Application:
Location privacy protection

References:
Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

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Development Stage:
A prototype is available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192613620Wed, 08 Mar 2017 14:42:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesUtilityUnited States8,856,93912/555,4569/8/200910/7/201412/19/20325/8/20152/27/2017Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesDivisionalUnited States9,239,93514/472,4628/29/20141/19/20169/8/20293/8/20173/8/2017FalseActive Noise Control System for Use in Noise Cancelling Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19258Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a system for noise control for use in noise cancelling devices such as headphones.

Description:
Reduction of noise in certain work and other environments is important for communication, safety, preservation of hearing, and for personal comfort.  Noise control using passive headsets generally provides substantial broadband noise reduction, but without the ability to selectively control one frequency of noise over another.  In addition, existing active noise control headsets have been limited to control of only low frequencies (less than 1 KHz) but are not able to reduce high frequency noise due to design limitations.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

Advantage:
• Selective (enables the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining desirable frequencies, such as those used for speech)
• Effective (enables mitigation of high frequency noises)
• Versatile (has utility in a wide variety of noisy environments, such dental offices, airplanes, machine shops and manufacturing facilities)

Application:
Noise control

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Development Stage:
An active noise control system consisting of a headset, speaker, microphone and controller has been developed, and large reductions of high frequency tonal noise have been demonstrated experimentally. 

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192583501Tue, 31 Jan 2017 12:47:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

]]>Advantage:Application:Noise controlStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Active Noise Control SystemUtilityUnited States9,558,73212/189,9678/12/20081/31/201712/2/20351/31/20173/6/2017FalseElectrophoretic Soil Nutrient Sensor for Agriculturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23550Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an in situ, electrophoresis based microfluidics ion nutrient sensor for the detection of anions in a soil solution extracted from the soil.  The sensors offers a new capability to analyze concentrations of various anions as well as cations, in automated extracted soil solutions with both high specificity and sensitivity. It includes the microfluidics for the automated extraction of soil solution.

Description:
Demands for on-site, in situ, real-time sensing exists for site-specific nutrient management in agriculture, where 30-40% of applied nutrients are wasted due to a lack of knowledge of site-specific plant needs, and those nutrients act as pollutants to waterways and the atmosphere.  This sensing system developed at ISU integrates a microfluidics device for sample intake and filtration, excitation source for generation of an electric potential, electrophoresis microchip for ion separation and readout mechanism to wirelessly transmit data.

Advantage:
• In situ electrophoresis based label-free inorganic ion sensor for detecting soil nutrient components
• Automatic sample collection and preparation
• Rapid measurement and read out to users and operators via wireless interface
• Can be utilized to inform a subsequent action, such as controlling a variable rate applicator
• Technology can be adopted for other applications as environmental/health/food monitoring

Application:
Precision agriculture or environmental monitoring where nutrient sensing is require

References:
Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:57:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235504454Wed, 11 Jan 2017 11:22:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHigh Sensitivity MEMS Pressure Sensorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22233Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a high-sensitivity microelectromechanical system (MEMS), graphene-based pressure sensor that outperforms any existing MEMS-based small footprint pressure sensor.

Description:
ISU researchers have developed a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) graphene-based pressure sensor realized by transferring a large area, few-layered graphene on a suspended silicon nitride thin membrane perforated by a periodic array of micro-through-holes. Each through-hole is covered by a circular drum-like graphene layer, namely a graphene “microdrum”. The uniqueness of the sensor design is the fact that introducing the through-hole arrays into the supporting nitride membrane allows generating an increased strain in the graphene membrane over the through-hole array by local deformations of the holes under an applied differential pressure. Further reasons contributing to the increased strain in the devised sensitive membrane include larger deflection of the membrane than that of its imperforated counterpart membrane, and direct bulging of the graphene microdrum under an applied pressure.

Advantage:
• 10X sensitivity compared to other MEMS sensors
• Good linearity over a wide pressure range
• Numerous applications
• Rapidly expanding market

Application:
Microsensors

References:
1. Graphene "microdrums" on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors. Qiugu Wang, Wei Hong, Liang Dong, Nanoscale 2016 Mar;8(14):7663-71

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 14 Jun 2016 11:05:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/222334491Wed, 15 Jun 2016 12:50:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Graphene "microdrums" on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors. Qiugu Wang, Wei Hong, Liang Dong, Nanoscale 2016 Mar;8(14):7663-71 ]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseReduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolutionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19688Summary:
The invention is a unique reachability resolution method that has been developed based on the refinement of the hybrid automation such that the reachability is reduced to the reachability in the underlying graph (without the dynamics) whenever the refinement step terminates.  This approach yields a technique that is effective in terms of achieving test coverage and efficient in terms of test generation time.  Software is available for testing.

Description:
Simulink/Stateflow is a popular commercial model-based development tool for many industrial applications.  For safety and security concerns, verification and testing must be performed on the Simulink/Stateflow designs and the generated code.  In this design, a novel test generation approach is presented by reduction to reachability in a Hybrid Automation, with its locations representing the computations of the model, and edges representing the computation-succession.  A unique reachability resolution method has been developed based on the refinement of the hybrid automation such that the reachability is reduced to the reachability in the underlying graph (without the dynamics) whenever the refinement step terminates.  This approach yields a technique that is effective in terms of achieving test coverage and efficient in terms of test generation time.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3739:  Modeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Software


Advantage:
• The problem of eventual executability of a computation path to that of reachability in a discrete-time computation-succession hybrid automation (CS-HA)
• A recursive refinement of CS-HA that preserves reachability to graph connectivity
• An algorithm to obtain a test that eventually executes a reachable computational path.
• Easy integration into Simulink.
• Automatically and efficiently generate test cases for Simulink/Stateflow models with feedback loops

Application:
Applications that requires automatic test generation in model-based development using Simulink/Stateflow

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution”, Meng Li and Ratnesh Kumar, 2013 IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, Madison, WI

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196884266Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:07:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3739:  Modeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Software

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution”, Meng Li and Ratnesh Kumar, 2013 IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, Madison, WI]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSensor for In-Situ, Wireless Soil Sensinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19678Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel, self-calibrating sensor for moisture and nutrients in soil that has wireless transmission and reception capability, making it especially useful as a sensing node for applications that are distributed over a wide area.

Description:
The advent of technologies such as GPS has driven the development of precision agriculture, which enables farmers to avail inter- and intra-field variations to manage resources and inputs so that costs and environmental impacts are minimized and productivity is maximized.  To help facilitate the management of important agricultural resources, ISU researchers have developed a self-calibrating, reliable and energy efficient soil moisture and nutrient sensor which can be buried at approximately root depth and is capable of wireless transmission and reception.  This sensor, which is based on the principle of impedance spectroscopy, can take real-time measurements of soil moisture and nutrient concentrations and transmit at frequencies much less than cellular, resulting in a much larger range.  The sensor is particularly well-suited for deployment as a node in a network of sensors that are spread over a large area, such as an agriculture field or drainage basin.

Advantage:
• Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements
• Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability
• Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions

Application:
Precision Agriculture; Environmental Monitoring; Underground to Above Ground Communication

References:
1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Prototype on-board sensors have been tested for soil monitoring applications using soil containing saline water and shown to have utility for measuring both soil moisture and ionic concentrations.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196784183Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:23:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements]]>Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability]]>Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMethod for Testing Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits Using Dynamic Element Matching for Source Linearizationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21055Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a procedure for testing analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits in either production or built-in self-test mode that is more cost effective or practical than existing approaches.  Method of designing integrated circuits incorporating BIST circuits that embed the testing procedures on chip to use performance feedback to adapt the performance of the circuit to meet desired specifications.

Description:
The method includes generating an excitation signal for testing by using dynamic element matching for performance enhancement of the test signal generator that applies an excitation, and/or by measuring an output of the device under test using dynamic element matching for performance enhancement of an output measurement device.

Advantage:
• Improved yield
• Enhanced performance
• Reduced die area
• Reduced or eliminated production testing requirement

Application:
Quality control in an electronics manufacturing environment

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:58:26 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210553055Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:58:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Quality control in an electronics manufacturing environmentStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for Testing Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits Using Dynamic Element Matching for Source LinearizationUtilityUnited States7,587,64710/909,1057/30/20049/8/200912/19/202712/7/20155/24/2017FalseStructurally Integrated Chemical and Biological Sensorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21040Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a structural integration of components including a photodetector, a long-pass filter, an excitation source and a sensing element to detect and quantify analytes.  These analytes are of prime interest in medical, biochemical, analytical chemical, occupational safety, microelectronics, environmental, military and forensics applications.

Description:
This invention is an innovative structural integration of photoluminescence (PL)-based chemical and biological sensors, which results in very compact, field-deployable devices. The structurally integrated components include the photodetector (PD) and a long-pass filter, the excitation source, and the sensing element. The PD and filter are based on thin films of hydrogenated amorphous Si and its alloys, the light source is an organic light emitting device (OLED), and the sensing element is based on thin films or solutions in microfluidic channels or wells.

Advantage:
• Very compact, field deployable sensor
• Complete integration yields robust and inexpensive sensors for a variety of chemical and biological analytes
• Enhances other sensor attributes, such as detection sensitivity and response time
• Using OLEDs reduces heat consumption and dissipation

Application:
Detection and quantification of analytes

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:08:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210403140Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:10:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Detection and quantification of analytesStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Integrated Thin-film Sensors and MethodsUtilityUnited States7,718,13011/401,2744/11/20065/18/20103/18/202912/7/20158/25/2017FalseClosed Loop 3D Printinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20757Description:
Currently, 3D printing, and in particular fused deposition modeling (FDM), employ constant extrusion temperature and head velocity.  It is important to note that the level of control currently available in FDM is similar to that in other 3D printing techniques, such as laser sintering, and thus the concept of closed loop control detailed here is applicable to other methods.  Because the processing parameters remain constant, there is limited control of the interfacial healing.  In order to control part quality of 3D printed parts, we suggest to vary the temperature of the extruder filament by using a secondary heat source. In more detail, while the temperature of the die is set to a relatively low point, an infrared heating source is used to heat the filament to the optimum temperature to enhance welding of the filament to substrate.

Advantage:
• Varies the temperature of an extruder filament of a 3D printing system to control part quality
• Automatically heats the filament to a temperature based upon the substrate temperature
• Substrate temperature is determined by model and/or thermal imaging device
• Provides an additional heating element to preheat the substrate to an ideal welding temperature
• Improves part quality and consistency in terms of strength and dimensions

Application:
3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling and laser sintering

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207574410Tue, 10 Nov 2015 08:18:52 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:]]>Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseComputer-Aided Tap Tester (CATT) for Inspection of Composite and Metal Honeycomb Structureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19491Description:
This technology is an instrumented tap test system that provides quantitative, image-based data regarding the mechanical properties of an inspection area. Driven by a laptop PC, the system produces two dimensional images (or "C-scans") that reveal flaws, damages, repairs and substructures in complex bonded structures such as metal honeycomb sandwiches and composite structures. It produces images of the local stiffness of the component, and the stiffness derived from the tap test was shown to agree with that obtained by static load tests. The instrument generates images that reveal the percent reduction in stiffness due to flaws or damage. It has utility in safety inspections for airlines and other industries, as well as application in quality assurance during fabrication.

Advantage:
• Image-based results - improves on earlier tap test methods and instruments that do not have imaging capability.
• Cost-effective.
• Quantitative stiffness data that are structurally meaningful.
• Simple operation with minimal training - no calibration standards required and test results independent of operator.
• High portability - driven by a laptop PC without need of external AC power.
• Manual and mechanized data collection.

Application:
1. Non-destructive testing and inspection of manufacturing-related or service-induced defects, flaws and damages in composite and metal honeycomb structures. 2. Aircraft manufacturers, composite components manufacturers and users, nondestructive instrumentation manufacturers 3. Safety inspections for airlines and other industries; quality control during fabrication of composite structures.

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Development Stage:
Advanced prototype is complete and available for demonstration. The prototype is expected to require very little development to be brought to market. The manual version had gone through field tests at three airlines and three military bases, and the system is undergoing beta-site tests at American Airlines in Tulsa, OK. The mechanized version is being completed and has also gone through some field tests.

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194912592Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:54:13 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Non-Destructive Inspections and the Display of Inspection ResultsUtilityUnited States6,327,92109/517,9573/3/200012/11/20013/3/20205/19/20155/19/2015FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseInterferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switchinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19138Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an optical switch capable of submicrosecond switching that may help meet the growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications.

Description:
Demand for optical data and communication networks continues to grow, and as a consequence, so does the need for high speed, high bandwidth switching technologies.  The development of all optical switching technologies has seen increased focus to help meet performance demands and the need for ultrafast signal processing. Magneto-optical switches have been investigated for optical switching applications because of their low insertion loss and ability to be integrated into optical systems.  However, magneto-optical switches have previously had slow switching times, on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an interferometric fiber switch which utilizes a magneto-optic Faraday rotator (MOFR). This system uses generation of a magnetic field via a magnetic pulse circuit to achieve high speed switching, on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. As a consequence, this optical switch may have utility for applications such as fiber-optic communications.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

Advantage:
• High speed (capable of switching speeds on the order of 100 ns)
• High stability (Sagnac configuration allows short path length and matched interferometric paths)
• Versatile (switch may either have a latching or nonlatching configuration)

Application:
Fiber optics communications; high capacity data networks

References:
“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

 

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:22 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191383977Tue, 18 Aug 2015 13:43:45 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Advanced Drive Circuitry for Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States9,110,31713/440,3554/5/20128/18/20153/1/20348/18/20152/27/2017FalseStanding Wave Axial Nanometry (SWAN) for Superresolution Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19669Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have an approach for performing 3-D measurements of single molecules with nanometer accuracy and precision.

Description:
Despite its importance as a research tool for understanding cellular functions, the optical resolution of light microscopy has imposed limitations on observing and measuring cellular components and structures. The advent of superresolution microscopy techniques, which enable imaging of nanostructures and processes at X-Y resolutions of approximately 20 nm, opens new opportunities for exploring cell biology and has many other applications.  However, current superresolution microscopy approaches may have limitations with respect to whether live or fixed cells can be imaged because of image acquisition and processing speed, and may also have limitations in terms of resolution along the Z axis.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new technique call SWAN (standing wave axial nanometry) for determining the axial location of nanoscale fluorescent objects with sub-nanometer accuracy and several nanometer precision.  Unlike other approaches, SWAN does not require custom optics or specially engineered substrates, which makes it easy to use with biological samples and live cells. SWAN can be easily integrated with other super-resolution and super-accuracy techniques to image with nanometer resolution along the lateral and axial directions.  As a consequence, this approach has broad utility for a variety of applications, such as life science research (e.g., biomolecular interactions, structure-function studies, cell imaging), drug discovery (e.g., direct observation of targeted drug delivery and drug interactions in vitro and in living cells and tissues), nanotechnology (e.g., characterization of nanoscale materials), material science (characterization of materials with novel optical properties), and optical MEMs devices by improving their efficiency through more accurate and precise imaging.

Advantage:
• Can be used with biological materials and living cells
• Extends working range
• Enables imaging with nanometer resolution along lateral and axial directions
• Does not require custom optics
• Can be used for single molecule AFM force measurement

Application:
Imaging for life sciences research, drug discovery, nanotechnology, materials science and optical MEMS devices.

References:
“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Proof-of-concept and utility has been demonstrated by using SWAN to measure the orientation of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths that were tethered to surfaces with different functionalities.  Commercialization partners are being sought for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196694045Wed, 12 Aug 2015 07:52:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and PrecisionUtilityUnited States9,103,78414/081,52211/15/20138/11/201511/15/20338/12/20152/27/2017FalsePiezoelectric-Based Vibration Energy Harvesterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19689Summary:
The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.


Description:
A potential means of extending battery life is the use of miniature renewable self-contained power supply units, which can convert ambient vibrations from existing sources in their environment into electrical form, and use this harvested energy to supplement batteries and/or other energy storage elements.  This invention employs a unique nonlinear, self-tuning, bistable vibration energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from broadband and varying-amplitude sources, combined with synchronized energy extraction circuits using electronic breaker switches for efficient harvesting.

Advantage:
• Extends battery life by effectively converting ambient vibrations into electrical energy
• Combines nonlinear bistable transduction with synchronized extraction
• Piezoelectric harvester with a simple micro-engineered design allowing a variety of material choices for ease of implementation
• ~100X increased harvested power, especially for broadband variations, compared to other harvesters using the same input, due to bistable transduction and synchronized extraction
• Presents a completely mechanical, zero-energy-cost method to increase range of excitation amplitudes over which the system remains bistable, further doubling the efficiency over varying amplitude excitations
• Presents for the first time an accurate mathematical model for a bistable transducer by augmenting the Butterworth van Dyke piezoelectric model to capture external magnetic forces

Application:
Remote sensors that can harvest ambient mechanical vibrations/energy to extend their battery life.

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196894354Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:25:52 GMTSummary:The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUse of Flexible Capacitive Strain Gauges in Tireshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19683Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have utilized soft, flexible capacitive strain gauges to report real-time changes in tire shape.  This information can provide information regarding tire slip, changes in driving surface and structural health of the tire.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the use of pliant capacitive strain sensors to monitor flexure in automotive tires.  The strain sensors, previously patented by MIT (U.S. Patent 8,384,398), are inexpensive to manufacture, responsive to small amounts of strain, and can easily be deployed around the entire interior circumference of the tire.  Information from the sensors could be used to monitor the structural health of the tire, terrain conditions, tire slip, over-inflation, loss of contact with the driving surface, and more.  Feedback can inform the driver of imminent failure and deteriorating road conditions, with application in personal, commercial and industrial vehicles.

Advantage:
• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall
• Sensitive to small amounts of stress

Application:
Tire monitoring to enhance the safety and controllability of vehicles

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196834124Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:25:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall]]>• Sensitive to small amounts of stress]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAn All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19292Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an optical on-off switch that can meet the fast switching demands required by high speed communications systems.

Description:
Fiber-based networks have been used to meet demand for ever increasing bandwidth, and fast switching is required to fully utilize the available bandwidth of the fiber. A variety of switching technologies have been developed to try and achieve fast and reliable switching, including optical micromechanical systems (MEMS)-based switching using silicon technologies, thermal optical switching, electro-optic switching, and acousto-optic switching. However, MEMs and thermo-optic switches suffer from slow (millisecond) switching times, while electro-optic switches have fast (nanosecond) switching times, but suffer from high insertion losses (~ 9 dB). Acousto-optic switches have microsecond switching times, but have insertion losses on the order of 6 dB. To overcome these disadvantages, ISU researchers have developed an all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch based on Faraday rotation of polarized light as it passes through a magneto-optical material. This switch has been demonstrated to have a switching time of 2 microseconds and an insertion loss of 4.8 dB. Because the required external magnetic field is low, the switch also has a simple design and be constructed using a fast solenoid for the drive circuit and a single magneto-optic block as the Faraday rotator

Advantage:
• Eliminates optical-electronic-optical conversions 
• Decreases switching time compared to MEMs and thermo-optic switches
• Reduces material costs through simple design

Application:
Fiber optic communications; data networks

References:
Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
An all fiber magneto-optical switch has been designed and demonstrated to have a switching time of about 2 microseconds.

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 12:24:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192923192Tue, 02 Jun 2015 07:30:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702]]>Group:ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,555,17711/733,8554/11/20076/30/20096/30/20175/8/20158/15/2017An All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsCIPUnited States7,916,98212/112,2664/30/20083/29/201112/27/20275/8/20156/2/2017FalseConcentric Coplanar and Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Non-Destructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19660Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed concentric coplanar and arc-Electrode capacitive sensors with applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered dielectric structures.

Description:
With advanced composites being used in aircraft, vehicles, and shipbuilding, demand for dielectric measurements has been increasing in recent years, as these types of measurements can be used to characterize a wide variety of materials, including thin films, substrates, circuit boards, semisolids, etc.  Capacitance methods have been used to characterize materials because of their simplicity, high accuracy, and relatively low cost.  ISU researchers have developed novel concentric coplanar and arc-electrode capacitive sensors that have utility for material characterization and non-destructive evaluation.  The coplanar sensor--   which has the advantage of rotational symmetry-- exhibits a strong measurable outcome capacitance and has various applications, including quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered planar dielectric structures.  For example, the concentric coplanar capacitive sensor could be used to detect water or excessive inhomogeneities caused by repairs in modern radome structures.  The arc-electrode capacitive sensor also exhibits a strong measurable output capacitance, and has applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered cylindrical dielectric structures, such as the wiring found in aircraft.  This technology is available for non-exclusive licensing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Advantage:
• The measurement technique employed for these sensors provides a quantitative relationship between the measurable sensor output capacitance and the material and structural properties of the material under test. Various measurement instruments, handheld capacitive sensors for example, can be developed based on this technology to quantitatively characterize the material and structural properties of multi-layered dielectric materials.

Application:
Non-destructive evaluation; material characterization

References:
T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196603815Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:43:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor System With Quantitative ModelUtilityUnited States8,791,70713/185,1567/18/20117/29/20148/19/20326/1/20158/4/2017FalseChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabricshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19263Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed ChainMap, an algorithm that optimally maps logic chains used in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) to improve their performance

Description:
Look-up table (LUT)-based FPGA have typically been used in prototyping rather than as critical design elements.  However, performance improvements have advanced FPGAs to being valuable in development of end-components.  An important dedicated structure found in currently available architectures is the arithmetic carry chain.  However, in designs that incorporate limited arithmetic operations and contain a carry-select style architecture, the carry chain is an under utilized resource.  To overcome this deficiency, ISU researchers have developed a novel algorithm, ChainMap, for depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in reconfigurable fabrics.  ChainMap establishes a difference between programmable routing connections and chain connections, and optimally identifies them without requiring the use of a user-specified hardware description language (HDL).  In addition, ChainMap allows the use of non-arithmetic as well as arithmetic chains. As a result, significant performance gains are achievable for all designs and design flow is freer.

Advantage:
• Effective (experimental results indicate that ChainMap improves performance up to 40% compared to HDL methods)
• Efficient (allows the use of non-arithmetic operations and does not require the preservation of HDL macros through the design flow)
• Flexible (eliminates the need for HDL to create logic chains and frees the design flow)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The algorithm is available for testing

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192633631Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:“Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

]]>Group:ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable FabricsUtilityUnited States8,661,39412/236,7819/24/20082/25/20141/16/20325/7/20155/5/2017FalseSagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19247Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel fiber-based magneto-optic on-off switch that enables compact, effective, and low cost switching capabilities.

Description:
The growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications, such as communication networks and optical data, has resulted in an increasing need for all-optical switching technologies.  However, the capacity that fiber-optic communications offers is limited by the bottleneck caused by electrical-optical conversions in current systems, and electronic switching approaches are not believed to be sufficient to meet future bandwidth demands.  Magneto-optical fiber-based switches have been viewed as promising for use in optical switches because of their low insertion losses and ease of integration into optical systems.  As part of an effort to develop practical magneto-optical fiber-based switches, ISU researchers have recently created a Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation.  This switch can be used to connect or disconnect a transmitter from a fiber optic network instead of turning the transmitter on or off electronically.  Since electronically controlled switching can take hundreds of microseconds, the ISU switch can help overcome switching bottlenecks.  In addition, since this novel fiber-based magneto-optic switch allows users to closer an optical fiber line when needed, it may enable applications that require compact, effective and low cost switching capabilities.  This switch structure can also be integrated to form a complete and cost-effective optical system as part of a photonic integrated circuit.

Advantage:
• Advantage: Rapid (switching times on the order of 100s nanoseconds are possible
• Simple (integration into silicon-based technology is easier than with existing approaches)
• Economical (has lower insertion loss and power consumption, and is less expensive to implement)

References:
1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

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Development Stage:
A prototype switch is available for testing

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192473654Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States8,478,08212/845,9437/29/20107/2/20136/17/20315/8/20155/5/2017FalseTechnology for Compact , Environmentally Friendly Air Conditioners and Heat Pumpshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19488Description:
Currently available heat and mass exchangers, key components in absorption heat pumps, are large and expensive to build. In spite of their favorability as environmentally friendly alternatives to CFC based air conditioners, their size and expense make them viable only for very large scale operations. This invention is a new design for heat and mass exchangers which are compact, modular, versatile, easy to design and fabricate, and can be constructed using existing heat transfer technology and extremely simple heat transfer surfaces. These heat and mass exchangers could be uniformly used for almost all components in an absorption heat pump, including absorbers, desorbers, condensers, evaporators and rectifiers.

Advantage:
• Use of these heat and mass exchangers in the large residential and low-tonnage markets would lead to less ozone depletion and global warming because absorption heat pumps do not rely on CFCs as thermal exchange fluids. The fluids they use are commercially available and inexpensive, as are the basic surfaces for constructing the exchangers. The technology will have lower capital and operational costs than competing technologies. In addition to use in private home and industrial air conditioning, the technology could be used by any industry that relies on thermal systems, such as manufacturing, chemical processing, and power generation industries. Competing products include: CFC based air conditioners for home use, traditional large scale heat and mass exchangers.

Application:
1. Space conditioning equipment manufacturers. 2. Chemical processing and power generation equipment manufacturers.

References:
1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194882500Tue, 19 May 2015 12:28:34 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersContinuationUnited States6,802,36409/669,0569/25/200010/12/200410/12/20165/19/201512/13/2016Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersCIPUnited States7,066,24110/894,3257/19/20046/27/20067/19/20195/19/20157/12/2017FalseCharacterizing and Fingerprinting Digital Communication Devices for Improved Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19313Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a method for monitoring the communication signature of digital communication devices that can be used for authentication and other security applications.

Description:
The proliferation of digital communications devices and wireless access points has lead to increasing security concerns; these security concerns generally fall under the areas of digital forensics, intrusion detection, and authentication. However, strategies for mitigating these concerns are often inadequate or create a significant administrative overhead burden, such as managing the use of passwords or private keys that are later verified as part of traditional authentication approaches.  To address these concerns, ISU researchers have developed a method of monitoring the communications signature of digital communications devices. These signatures act like voiceprints of the device, allowing it to be uniquely identified.  In addition, the voiceprints can be stored for either online, in-situ identification or for offline analysis. Online, the voiceprints can be used to detect intruders who are either tapping a digital communication device or changing network hardware so as to gain unauthorized access. Offline, the voiceprints are useful for forensic purposes such as proving that a given digital communication device was used in an attack. This technology also has potential for use in wireless network adapters, smart cards, and RFID tags.

Advantage:
• Versatile (enables physical authentication of a variety of digital communication devices)
• Protective (can be used forensically to track hackers and authorized users through the voiceprints they leave behind)

Application:
Authentication of communications devices on computers on networks; forensic analysis of digital communications devices; authentication of Smart Cards, RFID tags, and wireless network adaptors.

References:
Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The method has been demonstrated experimentally to enable Ethernet devices to be uniquely identified and tracked, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193133130Wed, 13 May 2015 12:40:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fingerprinting Digital Devices Using Electromagnetic Characteristics of their CommunicationsUtilityUnited States7,639,80611/087,3653/23/200512/29/200910/29/20285/8/20155/5/2017FalseLeak Detection in Pressure Vessels Using Structure-Borne Noisehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19303Summary:
Use of structure born noise to detect even very small leaks in pressurized vessels

Description:
Micrometeorite impacts on pressure vessels, such as a manned spacecraft, can create small leaks that are too small to detect easily, yet result in significant loss of air over time. While ultrasonic leak detectors are available, conventional designs detect leaks in the ambient atmosphere, and are not effective for detecting leaks into a vacuum because the sound resulting from turbulence downstream of the leak cannot be propagated in space or back into the spacecraft. To overcome this problem, ISU researchers have developed a method for leak detection using structure-borne noise. This method uses cross correlations between ultrasonic leak noise signals measured by two or more sensors to monitor and characterize leak-generated noise and locate the leak. This method may be applicable to the analysis of other pressure vessels, such as aircraft.

Advantage:
• Enables very rapid detection and location of air leaks
• Useful for leak detection in many types of pressure vessels.

Application:
Leak detection in manned space flight and pressure vessels; Nondestructive evaluation

References:
Two-Sensor Ultrasonic Spacecraft Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne Noise”, Stephen D. Holland, Ron Roberts, D.E. Chimenti, and Michael Strei, 2005, Acoustics Research Letters Online 6:63-68.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
A working prototype has been constructed, and ISU is seeking companies interested in licensing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193033289Wed, 13 May 2015 12:38:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Two-Sensor Ultrasonic Spacecraft Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne Noise”, Stephen D. Holland, Ron Roberts, D.E. Chimenti, and Michael Strei, 2005, Acoustics Research Letters Online 6:63-68.
]]>
Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne NoiseUtilityUnited States7,739,89911/413,5234/28/20066/22/20101/9/20285/8/20157/12/2017FalseCooperative Spatial Multiplexing for Wireless Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19308Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna

Description:
Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.

Advantage:
• Requires only one antenna
• Wireless terminal is small and lightweight
• Application in high data rate transmissions

Application:
Wireless data communications

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Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193083139Wed, 13 May 2015 12:03:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.Advantage:Application:

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cooperative Spatial MultiplexingUtilityUnited States8,345,69311/405,8584/18/20061/1/201311/26/20305/8/20152/27/2017FalseEnergy-Extraction-Based Active Noise Control Systemhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19299Summary:
Reduction of noise in vehicles, machinery, buildings or other structures is highly desirable, but difficult to achieve because of the complex physical interactions involved.  ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system with potential applications in a variety of industries, such as aircraft, home appliances, automobiles and machinery

Description:
Suppressing noise in home and work environments, such as in buildings, vehicles, engines, appliances, or machinery, is important for comfort and health reasons.  One approach to active noise control is to use adaptive disturbance cancellation techniques. However, effective noise control is hard to accomplish because analytical models for acoustic-structure interactions are difficult to obtain and significant modeling uncertainties persist.  To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

Advantage:
• Reduces noise generated from both structural and acoustic sources
• Achieves uniform broadband reduction in noise and vibration

Application:
Reduction of noise and vibration in acoustic structures for industries such as aircraft, home appliances, engines, and industrial machinery.

References:
“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192993045Wed, 13 May 2015 11:51:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.
]]>
Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise controlUtilityUnited States7,623,99310/731,74212/9/200311/24/200911/27/20265/8/20155/5/2017FalseImproved Robot and Stepper Motor Controlshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19306Summary:
ISU researchers have developed robot and stepper motor control software that contributes to the improved operation of robots

Description:
The Bouton-McConnell Stepper Motor Controller for Vibration-Free Fast Response, involves control techniques that permit stepper motors to behave like closed loop DC motors when implemented using  Robust Vibration Suppression (RVS) control techniques. This control technique enhances noise suppression and can achieve high speeds without sacrificing the control of residual vibrations. It can be applied to currently operating stepper motor systems.

Advantage:
• Robust (minimally affected by system operating dynamics)
• Fast (robot response time is minimized)
• Quiet (permits broad band noise suppression)
• Versatile (can be applied to a variety of control systems)

Application:
Robotic controls; stepper motor control

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
This technology has been applied to a flexible robot arm that moves a large distance in the range of 90 to 180 degrees using a minimal amount of time

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193061832Mon, 11 May 2015 12:10:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsUtilityUnited States6,002,23208/912,2838/15/199712/14/19998/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsContinuationUnited States6,011,37309/303,4624/30/19991/4/20008/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017FalseContext Sensitive Real-Time Data-Driven Music Algorithmshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19311Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a set of algorithms for creating music based on real time data.  This approach allows aural information to be combined with visual cueing to enhance data analysis.

Description:
We live in a world filled with sound and receive a wide range of information aurally. By adding this information to our visual cueing, we more fully understand our environment. Sound directs our viewing and adds essential contextual information.  Because of this, numerous efforts to sonify data—represent data with sound—have been performed.  However, these efforts have mapped data directly to various aspects of sound, causing a result that is difficult to understand or irritating to listen to.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a musical approach to the sonification of data.  Because music can convey a large amount of information, it can enable users to perceive more facets of the data.  This method includes the use of context sensitive grammars, fractal algorithms, and atonal compositional techniques with the result that the music builds in listenability and flexibility for broad applicability to different types of data without external intervention by the composer.  This approach also provides a connection between micro- and macro-scales of the data, thus allowing the user to fully experience its intricacies and interrelationships.  Potential applications of this technique include ambient awareness, exploration of large complex data sets for scientific research and engineering design, augmentation of remote control of tractors or other working machinery, enhancement of viewing of websites or museum displays, use as a composition tool for creating music for performance, and providing an additional information channel during crowd surveillance or other visual targeting/surveillance activities.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with diverse types of data sets)
• Flexible (use of atonal compositional techniques requires less rigid syntax than tonal music and enables real-time sonification)
• Listenable (musical approach creates pleasing aural results)

Application:
Sonfication of data for enhanced analysis and understanding.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A simulation is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193113074Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Creating Realtime Data-Driven Music Using Context Sensitive Grammars and Fractal AlgorithmsUtilityUnited States7,304,22810/985,30111/10/200412/4/200711/10/20245/8/20155/8/2015FalseImproved Eddy Current Coil Design for Nondestructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19209Summary:
Researchers have developed an improved design and method for making eddy current coils that are used in eddy current sensing probes for nondestructive testing.

Description:
Eddy current sensing has been a staple in techniques used for nondestructive evaluation of critical components such as air frames or engine parts. Coils used for eddy current sensing probes have traditionally been formed by hand by winding a wire a number of times around a core.  However, this approach to forming coils leads to variations in number of turns in a coil, spacing between the turns, and alignment of turns on the core, resulting in high variability in the coils and the eddy current sensing probes.  The significant variability of eddy current probe sensitivity has been recognized as an important issue for decades, and yet no satisfactory resolution has been found to date.  To address this issue, Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved eddy current coil design and fabrication procedure in which the coil is formed through depositing film traces. This process is amenable to machine manufacturing and provides more precision and uniformity in the coils, thus reducing their performance variability.  In addition, this method may enable the manufacture of probes that are smaller and more sensitive, and may be used for probes that have a single coil or a sensor array.

Advantage:
• Consistent (probes fabricated from these coils will give highly reproducible results)
• Simple (fabrication method is amenable to automation and avoids tedious forming by hand)
• Versatile (probe elements of various sizes can be produced)

Application:
Nondestructive evaluation

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192093062Thu, 07 May 2015 14:36:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Forming Coil for Use in Eddy Current Sensing ProbeUtilityUnited States7,795,86311/064,3252/23/20059/14/20104/12/20285/7/20159/15/2017FalseSpurious-Noise-Free Switching Power Converterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19207Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a new control scheme for switching power converters that makes them suitable for powering noise-sensitive loads, such as analog and RF (radio frequency) applications.

Description:
Switching power converters are extensively used in electronic devices because of their high power conversion efficiency. However, the spurious output noise they create due to periodic switching precludes their use for noise-sensitive loads—particularly analog and RF load types. Traditionally, linear regulators have been used to mitigate this problem, but can result in much lower power efficiencies. Spread-Spectrum control techniques, such as Σ-Δ and Δ modulation, can be used to reduce the spurious noise in switching power converters, but result in large wide-band increase in the noise floor, while random frequency hopping techniques reduce the spur level at the expense of generating multiple additional spurs. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new PWM control scheme for switching regulators that combines phase chopping with random frequency hopping to achieve completely spur-free operation, while delivering low output noise floor with no sub-harmonics due to hopping. The proposed architecture is very attractive for designing generic low-noise power supplies for spur-sensitive loads, as well as loads sensitive to the random noise floor without post linear regulation, extra passive filtering, or customization for each load. This results in much better power efficiency and reduced implementation size and cost. Moreover, since spur-elimination is based on the fundamental switching behavior of the regulator, spur-free operation is accomplished not only at the output, but at every node in the regulator including the input power and ground rails and the substrate. This significantly reduces Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and facilitates integration of switching regulators in mixed-signal Systems-on-Chip (SoCs) without interfering with other sensitive circuits that share the same substrate or power rails. The performance achieved by this novel control scheme makes switching power converters suitable for directly powering many noise-sensitive analog and RF applications, such as RF mixers, RF Low Noise Amplifiers, and RF Power Amplifiers. Additionally, the proposed architecture can be used for implementing class-D amplifiers with reduced EMI filters, and supply modulators for RF Polar Power Amplifiers. The proposed scheme constitutes minimal area, power, and design effort beyond traditional single-switching-frequency PWM-controlled design, and can be easily incorporated with an already existing regulator.

Advantage:
• Versatile (has utility for many noise-sensitive applications)
• Economical (reduces size, cost and power consumption)
• Efficient (obviates the need for post filtering stages and may extend battery life in portable applications)
• Integrate-able (can be easily integrated on the same chip with other noise-sensitive circuits without affecting their performance)

Application:
Switching power converters; power amplifier supply modulator

References:
1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The converter has been demonstrated to eliminate spurs and have a very low noise floor when implemented in 0.35 µM standard CMOS technology, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192073870Thu, 07 May 2015 13:00:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System and Method for Providing Power via a Spurious-Noise-Free Switching DeviceUtilityUnited States8,901,90513/397,2512/15/201212/2/201410/19/20325/5/20152/27/2017FalseIntegrated Phased Array Antennahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19206Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a phased array antenna system with improved spatial control for wireless communications.

Description:
Phased array antenna systems have many applications in wireless communications—particularly MIMO Communications (multiple input and multiple output).  By using multiple antennas to transmit and receive the signal, the transmit rate can be optimized to the capacity limit of the channel while simultaneously improving security.  Phased arrays steer the main beam of an antenna in a given angular direction in the line-of-sight (LOS) path reducing multipath effects. However, accurate adjustability of the phase and amplitude characteristics for each element of a phased array can be problematic, resulting in less than optimal control of beam patterns that can cause interference in areas of with intense use of wireless communications. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an integrated phased array antenna system that allows for spatial control of the received and transmitting antenna by controlling the phases and amplitude of each radiating element using baseband phase shifting, which is up converted to RF (radio frequency) using a phase lock loop (PLL) synthesizer.  As a consequence, the costs associated with performing phase shifting in the RF region, which was done previously, are mitigated and antenna performance is improved. The integrated phased array antenna has utility for applications such as wireless communications and networking, commercial and military radar, and space-time adaptive communications.

Advantage:
• Economical (lowers operating costs)
• Effective (enables accurate control of beam pattern of the array)

Application:
Communications and wireless networking

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192063587Thu, 07 May 2015 12:57:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Phased Array System Using Baseband Phase ShiftingUtilityUnited States8,013,79112/182,6787/30/20089/6/20111/30/20295/7/201511/15/2016FalseMethod and System for Manufacturing an Article Using Portable Hand-Held Toolshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19123Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for avoiding manufacturing mistakes by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools that are used during assembly.

Description:
During various manufacturing steps, such as assembly, welding, and painting, it is often necessary for a worker to use a hand-held tool.  However, it can be difficult, if not impossible, for a worker to consistently duplicate exact work from one assembly to another assembly.  For example, assembly lines often require many threaded fasteners to be assembled using a torque gun at a single workstation.  While currently used control systems can count the number of times the torque gun reaches the required torque value, they cannot determine if all the fasteners were tightened, or if some were tightened twice, or if the fasteners were tightened in a specific sequence, leading to the possibility of manufacturing mistakes.  To overcome this drawback, researchers have developed a method and system that not only can determine whether a particular manufacturing operation is carried out, but also determine whether the operation was carried out at the correct location and/or in the correct sequence. The system also provides feedback about the task completion status and the quality of the finished product.

Advantage:
• Detects and prevents mistakes during the manufacturing process by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools in real time and providing feedback in the event that the manufacturing process is not proceeding as prescribed.

Application:
Manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191233594Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:ManufacturingPatent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDevice to Determine Susceptibility to Root Lodginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19214Summary:
Researchers have developed a device that can be used to measure root lodging susceptibility in corn.

Description:
Corn is one of the most important and valuable crops grown in the US.  Because of its significance to agriculture, corn breeders strive to develop corn hybrids that are agronomically sound, with traits such as insect and disease resistance, tolerance for heat and drought, and high yield.  Mechanical harvesting of corn also demands that plants be uniform in growth rate, stand establishment, and size. In order for corn plants to stand tall and withstand various mechanical forces applied to the stalk, such as wind, rain, or harvesting equipment, it is important for the plant stalk to have good mechanical properties and be firmly anchored in the soil by its roots; traits such as stalk lodging and root lodging are related to the plant’s mechanical properties. Stalk lodging is breakage of the stalk below the ear while root lodging is where a plant leans away from the vertical access at a 30 degree angle or greater. Researchers have now developed a device that can be used to can be used to measure a corn hybrid’s susceptibility to root lodging earlier in the development of cycle of a new hybrid when fewer plants may be available for testing.  This device pushes on a corn stalk to simulate root lodging; it measures the vibration as force is exerted on the stalk and breakage occurs, and records the data. Thus, accurate comparisons among hybrids without the need to wait for wind or other environmental event to measure lodging are enabled. In addition, this handheld device is portable and easy to use, making it suitable for routine field testing.

Advantage:
• Enables testing for root lodging susceptibility earlier in the corn hybrid development cycle
• Allows for quantitative measurement of root lodging susceptibility and hybrid to hybrid comparisons
• Hand held and portable for easy field testing

Application:
Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodging

Other Patent:
Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926

Development Stage:
The device has been tested under a variety of soil conditions and plant maturity levels and has been shown to distinguish between strong and weak corn hybrids.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 11:02:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192143589Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodgingOther Patent:Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926]]>Development Stage:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Correlating Push Force and Stalk Vibration to a Plant's Susceptibility to Root LodgingUtilityUnited States7,987,73512/577,32910/12/20098/2/201112/26/20295/5/20155/5/2015FalsePneumatic Vibration Isolation Devicehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19106Summary:
Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

Description:
Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

Advantage:
• Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events
• Low cost
• Improves ride performance

Application:
Vehicle suspensions

References:
1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

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]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191063492Thu, 07 May 2015 07:54:53 GMTSummary:Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

]]>Description:Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

]]>Advantage:Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events ]]>Low cost ]]>Improves ride performance]]>Application:Vehicle suspensions

]]>References:1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Pneumatic Vibration Isolation DeviceUtilityUnited States8,302,94412/173,0637/15/200811/6/20129/6/20315/3/20154/8/2016False