Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:28:03 GMTThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:28:03 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityMagnetic two-way valves for paper based microfluidics: pathway for multi-step assayshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26576Summary:
ISU researchers developed a paper-fluidic valve that can reversibly switch fluid delivery into multiple channels with controlled volume and/or frequency. In terms of electric circuit equivalence, this valve is akin to a transistor or an SPDT relay, hence enables programmable fluid delivery.

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Description:
Point-of-care diagnostics are an area of emerging interest for many health-care applications, particularly in-home or personalized care. Paper microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technologies have attracted a lot of attention in this area due to their low cost, with the assays often being disposable. Switching and gating mechanisms that are possible in many non-paper lab-on-a-chip technologies are not possible in the paper based analogues however, so new solutions have to be developed in order for functionality of these diagnostic tests to be similar to the more expensive tests. In paper microfluidics, the development of smart, reversible, and versatile switches is critical for the regulation of fluid flow across multiple channels.  Common limitations of current switches include long response times, limited switching capabilities, and irreversibility. A gating mechanism that is reversible, quick, and versatile is therefore interesting. To respond to this market need Iowa State University researchers have developed a paper-based microfluidic valve, capable of being switched between multiple channels in a reversible fashion.

Advantage:
• Reversible
• Cheap
• Fast acting
• Multichanneled
• Programmable
• Power-free

Application:
Microfluidics, sample preparation, purification, separation, diagnostics, ordering fluids schemes

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Fri, 10 Nov 2017 11:38:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/265764675Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:24 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:]]>Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalsePoint heating-probing method for thermal conductivity measurement of bulk and film-like materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26395Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel point heating-probing device and method for measurement of thermal conductivity of bulks and film-like materials. This steady-state method uses a continuous laser to heat one tiny point on the bulk, and then measure another point for temperature drop to determine materials’ thermal conductivity.

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Description:
Thermal conductivity measures the heat conducting capability of a material. The measurements of thermal conductivity is critical for many areas such as material science, electronics, engineering and related fields. Conventionally, Searle's bar method and Lees' disc method are general methods for the thermal conductivity measurement of good and poor heat conductors, respectively. In these methods, the whole surface of a material needs to be evenly heated or cooled.
Alternative to conventional methods, ISU inventors developed this point heating-probing device and method by heating one point and probing the temperature at another point on the bulks' surface to determine its thermal conductivity. In this invention, determination of the ability to transfer heat of bulk and film-like materials is performed by using a hot point generated via laser excitation and an IR camera. The experiment implementation and data processing are superior to prior art. Compared with the current conventional whole bulk heating process, this method requires minimum sample preparation, thus is significantly more economic. Besides, this method is capable to measure materials with varied size, and achieve accurate results independently of environmental conditions.

Advantage:
• Needs only a small space to produce heating and measurement
• Requires little to no experimental preparation and provides accurate results independent of environmental conditions
• Widely applicable to materials of the size spanning from centimeters to meters
• Cost saving due to significantly less complicated process compared to convention full-face heating method
• The compact design of heating source and probing system enable the product to be portable
• The potential product could be easily designed in accordance with actual applications


Application:
This novel device and method will find applications for nondestructive testing and evaluation of thermal conductivity.


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]]>Fri, 13 Oct 2017 08:50:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/263954442Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:Alternative to conventional methods, ISU inventors developed this point heating-probing device and method by heating one point and probing the temperature at another point on the bulks' surface to determine its thermal conductivity. In this invention, determination of the ability to transfer heat of bulk and film-like materials is performed by using a hot point generated via laser excitation and an IR camera. The experiment implementation and data processing are superior to prior art. Compared with the current conventional whole bulk heating process, this method requires minimum sample preparation, thus is significantly more economic. Besides, this method is capable to measure materials with varied size, and achieve accurate results independently of environmental conditions.

]]>Advantage:]]>The potential product could be easily designed in accordance with actual applications

]]>Application:]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMachine for Computing Casual Inference from Time Series Datahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26331Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel algorithm approach for computing causal interaction from time series data. The proposed approach will help determine which time series data will cause or influence which other time series data, given two or more-time series data.

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Description:
The detection between cause and effect (causality) has long been a question in many scientific area. There are various theories developed so far, but they failed to give the causal structure in dynamic systems. Besides, none of these definitions is capable of differentiation of direct and indirect influence, and identification of links from the system.
Iowa State University researchers provided a new definition of information transfer between the states of a dynamic system, and the definition captures the intuitions of information transfer, like transfer asymmetry, zero transfer and information conservation. Furthermore, this measure clearly distinguish between direct and indirect influence.
The researchers has demonstrated that how this information measure can be used to characterize influence in real world networks. For example, analyzing time-series data of two different stocks it will be possible to determine which stock is causing or influencing the other stock i.e., the direction and degree of influence can be determined using our proposed approach. Similarly, in application involving health care and medicine discovery it will be possible to determine which genes among millions of genes in the gene regulatory network is most responsible for causing genetic disorder and hence disease.

Advantage:
• Captures the true causal structure in dynamic system
• Distinguish between direct and indirect influence
• Demonstration of the approach through stock prices analysis

Application:
This novel algorithm approach will find application in various filed where the primary goal is to infer causal interaction between two or more quantities, such as stock market, health care, medicine discovery and etc.

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]]>Wed, 27 Sep 2017 10:43:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/263314607Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:06 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:Iowa State University researchers provided a new definition of information transfer between the states of a dynamic system, and the definition captures the intuitions of information transfer, like transfer asymmetry, zero transfer and information conservation. Furthermore, this measure clearly distinguish between direct and indirect influence.
The researchers has demonstrated that how this information measure can be used to characterize influence in real world networks. For example, analyzing time-series data of two different stocks it will be possible to determine which stock is causing or influencing the other stock i.e., the direction and degree of influence can be determined using our proposed approach. Similarly, in application involving health care and medicine discovery it will be possible to determine which genes among millions of genes in the gene regulatory network is most responsible for causing genetic disorder and hence disease.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:This novel algorithm approach will find application in various filed where the primary goal is to infer causal interaction between two or more quantities, such as stock market, health care, medicine discovery and etc.Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLogarithmic Photo-Converter with Huge Dynamic Rangehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26090Summary:
This device is capable of measuring optical light levels that may vary from the single photon level up to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations. In fact, the upper range can be almost, apart from practical spatial details, as large as one desires. This device is possible due to the fact that the SiPMs can be exposed to daylight at full voltage without damage.

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Description:
Light sources that fluctuate by huge factors, from single photons up to 106 to 109 photons, are not common but do occur in the forward regions of particle colliders. They may also occur in bioluminescent materials over slower times scales, and possibly in optical measurements in non-destructive evaluation where the light level is varied over orders of magnitude to assess damage to a material.

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.

Advantage:
• Simultaneously sensitive to single photos and to arbitrarily large light levels
• Dynamic range can be calibrated after manufacture
• Input light does not have to be filtered or modified
• Accepts all incident light

Application:
Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.

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]]>Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:10:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/260904612Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:58 GMTSummary:

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For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRapid Enrichment of Viable Bacteria using Magnetic Ionic Liquids for PCR Amplification and Culture-Based Diagnosticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25426Summary:
ISU researchers have developed new molecules with an accompanying method to preconcentrate bacteria for rapid detection for food safety testing.

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Description:
The detection of viable bacteria in food, environmental, or clinical samples is limited by time-consuming enrichment procedures (e.g., overnight cultures) that are often mandatory for the analysis of extremely small quantities of microorganisms. Iowa State University researchers have developed new molecules to act as magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) and an method of use thereof to isolate, extract, and concentrate bacteria in an efficient manner for rapid testing purposes. These tunable MILs present unique physiochemical properties, resulting in materials that are responsive to external magnetic fields. Using this magnetism allows for easy separation of the MILs and extracted material from non-magnetic media. ISU inventors have demonstrated the ability of their specially designed MILs to be able to extract bacteria with high specificity. After a simple separation and culturing in broth, quantifiable colonization of recovered bacteria begins within two hours. This enrichment approach can be coupled with PCR amplification to further increase sample throughput. Regardless of downstream detection methods, MIL-based preconcentration of bacteria constitutes an enrichment strategy that allows for significantly faster detection of relevant bacteria for the food safety testing industry.

Advantage:
• Fast preconcentration of bacteria
• Allows for higher throughput of detection

Application:
Food safety testing, research tool

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/254264591Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:14 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:Food safety testing, research toolPatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseTransparent soil made by gel beadshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25370Summary:
This innovation appears to be the first description of using beads made with “natural” gelling materials to observe plant roots. The bead formulation is novel and optimized for plant growth.

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Description:
ISU researchers reported their invention to be a transparent soil medium which can provide a heterogeneous environment with aeration and porous condition for plants. The medium is composed of commonly used gels and is transparent in a basal medium solution. The transparent soil composition is controllable, affordable, and require simple processing protocols. Brassica rapa grown in transparent soil shows root phenotypes resembling those of pure soils, as opposed to the phenotypes observed with homogeneous gels.

Advantage:
• Shelf life
• Aeration by using beads
• Potential for near infrared root imaging (no need for visible light)
• Easy to prepare

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253704601Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:05 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseImproved Spinach Aptamer Ligandshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25064Summary:
Improved spinach (and broccoli) aptamer ligands for in vitro applications delivering increased signal intensity when associated with the target aptamer.

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Description:
Light-up aptamers,which create a fluorescent signal on binding to their ligands, are promising sensors for in vitro homogeneous assays and for in vivo applications. When linked to other aptamers of defined specificity that drive their ability to bind ligand, these light-up aptamers can report on the presence of analytes in vitro that range from metabolites to proteins.
The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

Advantage:
• Increased signal strength
• Suitability for in vitro application
• Facile chemical synthesis protocols

References:
Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:07:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/250644502Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

]]>Advantage:

]]>References:Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModular Unit for Thermal Conductivity Measurements in Multiple Cryogenic/Magnetic Field Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24096Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a modular sample stage and thermal conductivity measurement device that is compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field apparatus.  This modular device allows for easy switching between apparatus to perform a variety of measurements without sample or thermometer remounting.

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Description:
The thermal conductivity of a material is of great importance for determining suitability for a given application.  While many techniques have been developed to measure thermal conductivity at moderate temperatures, measurement at low (sub-kelvin) temperatures are difficult to achieve.  These low temperature measurements are important to characterize novel materials, particularly in determining the superconducting state while isolating electronic degrees of freedom.

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

Advantage:
• Modular sample stage and measurement device compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field devices.
• Minimizes sample handling and mounting and eliminates experimental error from different thermometers and calibration.

Application:
Low temperature (< 1K) thermal conductivity characterization of novel materials.

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]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:11:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240964582Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:47 GMTSummary:

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As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

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]]>Application:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHigh-Throughput selective capture of biological cells by dielectrophoresis at a bipolar electrode arrayhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23519Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a device that employs an array of > 1,400 wireless electrodes for the continuous high-throughput isolation of cells that often are expressed in small concentrations.

Description:
ISURF #04548 describes an array of > 1,400 wireless bipolar electrodes (BPEs) in dielectrophoresis (DEP) devices. This allows for a large volume of cells to quickly be sorted based on dielectrophoric response. Without ohmic contact to the individual array elements, capacitive charging of the electrical double layer at opposing ends of each BPE allows an AC electric field applied by only two driving electrodes to be transmitted across the entire device. The electric field distribution is readily tuned by altering the dimensionality of BPEs. A suggested use of this technology is for detecting the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC), which can be expressed as low as 1 in a billion cells, and that current technologies fall short of being able effectively diagnose, resulting in false negatives of patients in remission. ISU researches have thus far shown promising results of separating out breast cancer cells from white blood cell fractions.

Advantage:
• DEP separation allows for good sensitive and high specificity
• Wireless technology allows for new architectures and large arrays
• High throughput of cell

Application:
Cell capture and seperation

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseHigh-number Gene Fragment Assemblyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22741Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that can assembly up to 45 fragments into a full-length gene sequence with only two steps, the assembly step and the PCR step.

Description:
Gene synthesis technology, in contrast to gene engineering, is a method in synthetic biology that is used to create genes de novo. It has become a powerful tool in many fields of recombinant technology including gene therapy, vaccine development and molecular engineering. Current approaches are mostly based on a combination of organic chemistry and molecular biological technique, and requires multiple steps to successfully assembly a full-length gene. For instance, oligonucleotide ligation and PCR-based assembly. Also, the number of DNA fragments in one assembly is always limited to 11 or even less. To solve this problem, ISU researchers have developed an assembly method with the help of the thermodynamic analysis software PICKY created by the same group previously. The assembly method can push the limit up to 45 fragments and only needs two steps in one reaction tube, the assembly step and the PCR step. With this technique, companies can synthesize much longer genes with many fragments using one reaction instead of the tiered assembly scheme. This will improve both the cost and quality of gene synthesis services.

Advantage:
• Allows high number fragments (up to 45) in one assembly reaction
• Able to synthesize longer genes for various follow-up experiments
• Low-cost and high quality gene synthesis service
• Easy to be adapted in the laboratory

Application:
Gene synthesis

Patent:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3554: PICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Tool

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]]>Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:08:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/227414280Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:00 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 3554: PICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Tool

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA Method to Create Ultra-flat Metal Surfaceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21858Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method to produce ultra-flat metal surfaces without the compromises inherent to chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP).

Description:
Ultra-flat surfaces are important commercially for the semiconductor fabrication industry, and also are of interest for scientific studies of self-assembled monolayers, bilayers, electrodes and single-molecules. There are several methods to create ultra-flat surfaces including CMP which is the most common method currently used but is often a method of compromises, attempting to balance material removal rate against the susceptibility to produce scratches and other faults into the material. ISU researchers have developed new method of creating ultra-flat surfaces through a “mechanical annealing” process. The technique involves the bombardment of a surface with atoms (principally from transition metals) that fill in surface faults and results in an atomically flat surface.

Advantage:
• Significant cost reduction compared to CMP
• Consistent, reproducible flat surface
• Very large semiconductor market
• Minimal cleanup after surface fabrication

Application:
Semiconductor fabrication and scientific research

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 05 May 2016 13:14:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218584336Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:12 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseQuerying User-Defined Mathematical Functionshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21857Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new query primitive called Function Object Query (FOQ) that allows users to interpret a database as a collection of mathematical functions and retrieve those whose output under a given function input satisfies certain conditions.

Description:
The FOQ functions, their input, and output condition are all user-defined, making FOQ a powerful vehicle for analytical information retrieval. FOQ is most similar to the existing top-k preference query. A preference query ranks the objects with a preference function where users assign different weights (i.e., their preferences) on different attributes and aggregate the weighted results.

Advantage:
• FOQ allows any complex mathematical functions, which can be linear and non-linear, monotonic and non-monotonic, polynomial and non-polynomial, with no restriction on the input domain.
• An FOQ can be in different forms, including range FOQ (i.e., retrieving the objects whose function outputs are within a certain range), top-k FOQ (i.e., retrieving the objects whose function outputs are among the top k), and k-nearest neighbor (i.e., retrieving the k objects whose function outputs are closest to a certain value).
• Our solutions take advantage of the fact that the intersections of a set of functions partition the input domain into a number of subdomains, and in each of these subdomains, the functions are sortable according to their outputs. This discovery allows us to develop a generic indexing structure for highly efficient processing of FOQs.

Application:
Examples of such applications are plenty, including ranking an object (e.g., universities, movies, jobs)  with user-defined formulas, finding patients with high risk of breast cancer, diabetes and/or Alzheimer’s, customers with minimal financial risk, just to name a few.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDouble lens device for tunable harmonic generation of laser beams in KKBBF/RBBF crystalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21825Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an improvement to KBBF crystal systems for the generation of ultraviolet laser light by creating an alternative prism geometry that eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling devices.

Description:
Lasers consisting of light from the ultra-violet portion of the spectrum have both scientific and commercial applications. Scientifically, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lasers can be used in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic parameters of solids. Commercially VUV lasers are of interest in semiconductor manufacturing, as the wavelength of the higher frequency spectra could produce much finer structures using photolithography. One source for generation of VUV lasers is passing a lower frequency laser beam through potassium beryllium fluoroborate (KBBF) crystals, resulting in a harmonic frequency laser. For economic reasons, KBBF crystals are grown very thin; as incident light upon the crystals is at a very acute angle, the resultant VUV laser has a low efficiency as most of the light is subsequently reflected off the surface of the crystal.

Advantage:
• Generates desired ultraviolet laser light
• Alternative prism geometry
• Eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling
• Allows for easy tuning of the laser beam

Application:
Laser optics, Semiconductor manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218254246Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:06 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseQuery Authentication and Correction Through Parity Codinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21702Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have proposed a novel solution that uses multiple cloud service providers, which may be potentially untrustworthy, for data management.  Users query the servers for the data of interest and are allowed to perform both authentication and correction.

Description:
This technology associates the original set of data with a set of parity data and then distributes them among a set of cloud servers that are managed independently by different service providers. This can detect if a query result is correct, and correct it if it is not.  This is achieved through simple parity computation, without complex cryptographic techniques, and as such, this technology incurs less overhead in storage, communication, and computation, which benefits all three parties – data owners, data users and service providers.

Advantage:
• Allows both authentication and correction on query results
• Does not rely on cryptographic techniques and reduces query processing time
• Does not require the installation of any additional software on a cloud server
• Can be used for all users of current commercial cloud services from vendors such as DropBox, Amazon, IBM and free cloud services such as Openshift and Heroku Postgress for file management and database management

Application:
The proposed technology can be used for all users of current commercial cloud services.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 14:01:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217024438Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:02 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21069Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210694135Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21068Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210683958Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseVisible Light Absorbing Photoremovable Protecting Groupshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21063Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed photoremovable protecting groups (often referred to as “photocages”) that photoheterolyse in response to light in the visible spectrum.

Description:
Photoremovable protecting groups are chemical agents that provide control over the release of any number of reagents in a variety of environments. From bioagents (including active chemical compounds, nucleotides and other compounds) to ions, acids, bases, oxidants, etc., photoremovable protecting groups (PPGs, or alternately, photocages) are used to release these compounds in response to light. All commonly-used photocages respond to UV light. The use of visible light provides several distinct advantages, including depth of penetration in biological tissues, limited damage to biological tissue, researcher safety, and potential for use of multiple photocage-reagent combinations responsive to different light wavelengths in experimental design.

Advantage:
• Photochemical lysis responds to light absorption in the visible light range
• Can be tuned to different wavelengths of light so that multiple differently caged molecules could be released in response to different light sources
• Will work with a wide variety of biological and non-biological molecules

Application:
Laboratory reagent

References:
P.P. Goswami et al., “BODIPY-Derived Photoremovable Protecting Groups Unmasked with Green Light”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 137, pp. 3783-3786, 2015.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210634254Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:P.P. Goswami et al., “BODIPY-Derived Photoremovable Protecting Groups Unmasked with Green Light”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 137, pp. 3783-3786, 2015.]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMonoclonal Antibodies against a Novel Isoform of Human Protein Kinase C Deltahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21053Description:
ISU researchers have developed highly specific monoclonal antibodies against human PKC δ. One of the antibodies of this invention (10F11B) is far superior to a widely-used commercial antibody. The researchers have used the 10F11B antibody to measure the PKC δ protein in primary mouse astrocytes and in mouse striatum and hippocampal tissue by Western blot analysis. In addition, the same antibody has been used for immunochemistry applications including identification of PKC δ in cell layers of the cerebellum.   The 10F11B hybridoma is available for licensing on a non-exclusive basis.

Advantage:
• Highly specific monoclonal antibody
• Superior to current commercially available antibody
• Suitable for ELISA, immunochemistry, and Western blot analysis

Application:
Research, Diagnostic Development

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:49:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210534423Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:32 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseChallenge Strains of Mycoplasma bovishttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21050Description:
There is a need to have highly pathogenic strains of Mycoplasma bovis to challenge cattle that are vaccinated with vaccine candidates against Mycoplasma bovis in order to test the efficacy of the vaccine candidates. ISURF is making available for licensing on a non-exclusive basis two Mycoplasma bovis strains (M23, 428E) suitable to help validate Mycoplasma bovis vaccine candidates and for diagnostics.  The strains were recovered from two different outbreaks of Mycoplasma bovis pneumonia and polyarthritis in Iowa cattle.  Description of one of the outbreaks has been published.  Description of the pathogenic potential of both strains has been presented at conferences.  One of the strains (M23) has been used as standard strain for cattle infection reports, and as wild-type to develop various mutants with gene disruptions or deletions.

Advantage:
• Well-characterized strains
• Suitable for diagnostics and vaccine validation

Application:
Research, Diagnostics, Vaccine Validation Studies

References:
Rosenbusch, R. F. Bovine mycoplasmosis. Proceedings of the 34th Annual Convention of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, pp 49-52, Vancouver, British Columbia, 2001.

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:39:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210503876Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:30 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Rosenbusch, R. F. Bovine mycoplasmosis. Proceedings of the 34th Annual Convention of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, pp 49-52, Vancouver, British Columbia, 2001.Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseStructurally Integrated Chemical and Biological Sensorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21040Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a structural integration of components including a photodetector, a long-pass filter, an excitation source and a sensing element to detect and quantify analytes.  These analytes are of prime interest in medical, biochemical, analytical chemical, occupational safety, microelectronics, environmental, military and forensics applications.

Description:
This invention is an innovative structural integration of photoluminescence (PL)-based chemical and biological sensors, which results in very compact, field-deployable devices. The structurally integrated components include the photodetector (PD) and a long-pass filter, the excitation source, and the sensing element. The PD and filter are based on thin films of hydrogenated amorphous Si and its alloys, the light source is an organic light emitting device (OLED), and the sensing element is based on thin films or solutions in microfluidic channels or wells.

Advantage:
• Very compact, field deployable sensor
• Complete integration yields robust and inexpensive sensors for a variety of chemical and biological analytes
• Enhances other sensor attributes, such as detection sensitivity and response time
• Using OLEDs reduces heat consumption and dissipation

Application:
Detection and quantification of analytes

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:08:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210403140Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Detection and quantification of analytesStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Integrated Thin-film Sensors and MethodsUtilityUnited States7,718,13011/401,2744/11/20065/18/20103/18/202912/7/201511/13/2017FalseDroplet Actuator and Methods of Droplet Manipulationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21034Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a portable system to perform droplet operations such as transport, mixing, merging, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets. The system uses two electrical motors to tilt a planar platform at pre-specified angles, thereby allowing multiple droplets to move in pre-decided patterns.

Description:
The invention is a portable system to perform droplet manipulations such as transport, mixing, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets.  The novelty is in the methods of moving droplets using gravitational force and mechanical jerks.  The design of hydrophilic patterns, along with the gravitational and mechanical tilting of the platform, help move the droplets.  The utility of this invention is the ease of use and low-cost compared to the existing technology being used today.  This system can help automate a diverse range of applications in molecular diagnostics of physiological samples.

Advantage:
• Portable, cost efficient design compared to currently available automated liquid handling systems
• Uses mechanical jerks and gravity to move droplets vs. current systems which use high electrical voltages, laser beams or vibrations from sound generating devices
• Utilizes unique techniques of printing patterns of specific shapes and sizes on a low-cost transparency film that has been treated to provide hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas

Application:
Immunology, protein chemistry, biomarker identification and molecular diagnosis of physiological samples

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210344313Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Senecavirus A as Etiology of Vesicular Disease and Methods to Propagate the Virus in Vitrohttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21032Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified, purified, and characterized cell culture-derived isolates of Senecavirus. A. The full genome sequence of the new isolates revealed that the isolates are genetically distinct from previously known Senecavirus A viruses.

Description:
Genetic changes/mutations have made the virus virulent, thus accounting for the 2015 vesicular disease outbreak in show and commercial pigs which have been seen in a number of States in the Midwest including IA, SD, IL, IN, MO, MN. From the rapid spreading and frequent identification of the virus, researchers concluded that prevention and control measures will be needed and that the isolates have value as tangible property for biologics and diagnostics. The isolates have been propagated continuously in culture to high titer at ISU and the idiopathic vesicular disease was reproduced with one isolate (in collaboration with the USDA). Propagation of the virus to a high titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents.

Advantage:
• Distinct new viral strains
• Full genome sequence available
• High titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents
• Addresses a niche market

Application:
Therapeutic / Vaccine Development

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210324416Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:20 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Therapeutic / Vaccine DevelopmentIntellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Senecavirus A as Etiology of Vesicular Disease and Methods to Propagate the Virus in Vitrohttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21031Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified, purified, and characterized cell culture-derived isolates of Senecavirus. A. The full genome sequence of the new isolates revealed that the isolates are genetically distinct from previously known Senecavirus A viruses.

Description:
Genetic changes/mutations have made the virus virulent, thus accounting for the 2015 vesicular disease outbreak in show and commercial pigs which have been seen in a number of States in the Midwest including IA, SD, IL, IN, MO, MN. From the rapid spreading and frequent identification of the virus, researchers concluded that prevention and control measures will be needed and that the isolates have value as tangible property for biologics and diagnostics. The isolates have been propagated continuously in culture to high titer at ISU and the idiopathic vesicular disease was reproduced with one isolate (in collaboration with the USDA). Propagation of the virus to a high titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents.

Advantage:
• Distinct new viral strains
• Full genome sequence available
• High titer will aid in producing vaccines and diagnostic reagents
• Addresses a niche market

Application:
Therapeutic / Vaccine Development

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:10:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210314422Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicroscale Tentacle Actuatorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21029Description:
ISU researchers have invented a soft material-based manipulator for delicate, fragile microscale objects. It is based on a thin-walled elastomeric microtube with an asymmetric wall thickness distribution and one end closed. Upon applying air pressure from the open end, the microtube becomes elongated non-uniformly, bending towards the thick-walled side. This type of bending, however, is often insufficient to induce a spiraling which mimics the coiling motion of biological tentacles, such as those of the octopus. To amplify the bending into multi-turn spiraling, we installed a small extra thickness (i.e., hump) to the exterior of the microtube. When the size and position of the hump were adequate, the microtube could accomplish multi-tum spiraling which is ideal for winding around small objects and scoop them up. This type of conformal spiraling motion is non-destructive since it does not involve squeezing and will be useful for safe handling of cell aggregates, eggs, or biological tissues that are highly fragile.

Advantage:
• Can handle soft, fragile micro-objects that is not offered today
• Capable of grabbing objects as small as ~ 185 µM with a grabbing force of ~ 0.78 mN
• Unique fabrication techniques of the thin, highly deformable microtubes

Application:
Biological microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS)

References:
Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210294387Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:17 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTriple Halo Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Coilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21028Description:
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, safe method for the treatment of neurologic disorders such as depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Parkinson's disease. Currently, TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of depression.  The existing commercial TMS coils can only stimulate the cortical regions of the brain. For the success of the treatment of other neurological disorders, there is a need for the development of TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain. Development of deep brain stimulation coils is challenging as the magnetic field decays rapidly with the distance from the source (coil surface). Magnetic fields with sufficient magnitude to stimulate the deeper regions of the brain should not stimulate the scalp of the patients. ISU researchers have developed a novel coil design based on our earlier "Halo Coil" configuration. This design of the new coil called the "Triple Halo Coil" will be able to stimulate deeper regions of the brain.

Advantage:
• The first of its kind that could potentially be used for the treatment of deep brain disorders non-invasively, safely and in an out-patient setting
• Capable of stimulating deeper regions of the brain with more than 10 times the magnetic field for the same amount of surface field at a depth of 10 cm
• Coils have been configured such that they do not overstimulate any part of the brain surface
• Electric and magnetic fields were calculated in heterogeneous head models

Application:
Health care. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210284376Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:17 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMiniaturized Continuous - Flow Wineryhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21027Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a miniature continuous-flow winery with immobilized yeast cells, mass transport via porous membranes, in-line alcohol sensing and temperature control.

Description:
Today, wine is typically produced in large batches, with volumes 10-100,000 liters. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 2 weeks, and the remaining winemaking operations occur within weeks to months. Yeast cells are dispersed in the juice. Monitoring of fermentation and production is done by sampling.

This invention uses a continuous flow rather than a batch approach. Volumes of wine produced are on the order of 1 mL per unit. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 3-4 days. The yeast is not dispersed in the juice but separated from the juice by a porous hydrophilic membrane, and from the ambient air by a hydrophobic membrane. Inline electrical impedance sensing monitors the alcohol content. A miniature alcohol sensor and temperature control are integrated in the microwinery.

Advantage:
• Better and more precise screening of optimum winemaking temperature, with enhanced control of temperature
• Simpler and higher throughput screening of yeast type since no sedimentation or clarification is required
• In-line sensing is faster and more convenient than sensing by sampling
• Scale-up of output does not require the redesign of operating conditions.  Microwineries are cheap and easily duplicated
• Unprecedented control of fermentation and temperature allows the making of wines that have never been made.

Application:
Wine making and testing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210274358Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:16 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

This invention uses a continuous flow rather than a batch approach. Volumes of wine produced are on the order of 1 mL per unit. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 3-4 days. The yeast is not dispersed in the juice but separated from the juice by a porous hydrophilic membrane, and from the ambient air by a hydrophobic membrane. Inline electrical impedance sensing monitors the alcohol content. A miniature alcohol sensor and temperature control are integrated in the microwinery.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseCustom Microstructure Patterning for Metal Matrix Composites (MMC)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20857Description:
One of the challenges in making layered metal composites reinforced at interfaces has been controlling the dispersion and microstructure of the reinforcement particles.  The reinforcement elements are typically applied at the interface by manual spreading using brush or by immersing the substrate in a suspension.  The technology described herein provides a method of fabricating a metal matrix composite wherein the method involves ultrasonic spraying reinforcement particles through a patterned mask to deposit on individual metallic sheets a pattern of discrete islands of reinforcement particles. 
The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

Advantage:
• A wide range of MMC’s such as copper, aluminum, magnesium nickel and their alloys can benefit from this process.  Sheets or foils of such metallic matrix can be used.
• A wide variety of nano-scale reinforcement particulate materials such as silicon carbide, aluminum oxide and titanium carbide may be deposited using this method
• Simple and low-cost process using an ultrasonic spraying which can be practiced using commercially available equipment
• Accurate control of the deposition rate resulting in a smoother and more uniform deposition utilizing a very low spraying velocity
• Flexibility in producing thin multilayered deposited structures

Application:
Metal laminate composites

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]]>Wed, 11 Nov 2015 14:35:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/208574311Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:06 GMTDescription:The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSoil Nitrate System for Precision Management of Nitrogen Fertilizer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20755Description:
The soil nitrate sensing system allows nitrate to be analyzed rapidly in-real-time in the field. By measuring nitrate at multiple locations along with GPS coordinates for each location, the system can be used to rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations, which can be used as the basis for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications. Alternatively the sensor can be attached to (integrated with) a fertilizer applicator, allowing real time modulation of nitrogen fertilizer application rates based on measured soil nitrate levels. The soil nitrate sensing technology will make the Late Spring Nitrate Test (LSNT) practical and cost effective for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications.

Advantage:
• Real-time, on-the-go soil nitrate concentration sensing technology that can be attached to farm implements
• Measures soil nitrate concentrations in the parts per million range within ~1 second, so GPS registered data stream can be acquired
• Depth averaging (0 to 12 inches) to meet LSNT protocol
• System can rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations
• Makes precision sidedress nitrogen fertilizer applications possible – improving nitrogen use efficiency in crop production, saving farmers money, and reducing impact on the environment

Application:
Precision agriculture

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207554383Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:03 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicrowave Plasma Throttled Combustion of Energetic Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20339Summary:
Future mission requirements of energetic material systems demand the ability to a tune the output (burning rate, thrust, specific impulse, radiant emission) of a broad range of energetic materials. More specifically for solid propellants, considerable work has been conducted on the development of electrical and valved throttling techniques. However, these techniques are either formulation-specific or are propellant temperature limited. Conversely, the proposed plasma throttling technique has been demonstrated with a number of solid propellant and pyrotechnic compositions and is not formulation specific. This enables throttling of higher performance energetic systems. In this method, a pulsed microwave source is used to deposit energy to the gas-phase flame of a burning energetic material. Steady combustion of the energetic material is perturbed to an unsteady state through microwave absorption within the gas-phase flame of an energetic material that is doped with materials which themselves or in decomposition produce species which readily couple with microwave irradiation within the gas phase combustion flame in order to produce ionization and/or formation of a plasma. The resulting enhanced energy feedback to the burning surface enables drastic enhancement of energetic material burning rate.

Advantage:
• Enhanced control: Throttling of the combustion rate of an energetic material
• Enhanced performance: Resulting plasma and flame temperature increase enhances radiometric emission of pyrotechnics (e.g. decoy flares) and may also enhance specific impulse of propellants.
• Formulation-independent throttling of the combustion of energetic materials, enabling throttling the performance of a broad range of energetics (composite, double-base, CMDB propellants, and pyrotechnics)
• Unobtrusive, light weight technique: No heavy or flame-exposed hardware is required; throttling hardware exists outside the region of combustion
• High tunability: Pulsed microwave deposition can allow high tunability of propellant combustion through control of repetition rate and duty cycle

Application:
Solid/hybrid/liquid propulsion, pyrotechnics

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

References:
J. Lynch, M. Ballestero, R. Cazin, J. B. Michael, T. R. Sippel, “Microwave-Supported Plasma Combustion Enhancement of Composite Solid Propellants Using Alkali Metal Dopants,” to be presented at the 54th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Jan. 4-8, 2016, San Diego CA.

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]]>Tue, 22 Sep 2015 08:10:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/203394381Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:56 GMTSummary:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forReferences:Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:45 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHybridoma Cell Lines for Mycoplasma bovishttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19581Description:
Two mouse/mouse stable hybridomas (87, 163) have been developed against M. bovis strain M23. M. bovis is associated with a variety of bovine diseases including arthritis and pneumonia of calves and young cattle, mastitis, and genital tract infections. It is considered the most virulent bovine mycoplasma in the US. Ascite fluid from these two hybridoma cells can be use in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues and is highly specific in ELISA, IFA, and immunoblot analyses to six strains of M. bovis (M23, Emm, Bat, 1315, M66, and M84) originating from cases of bovine pneumonia or mastitis. They show no cross-reactivity with other bovine mycoplasma species often encountered in the US, Canada, and Europe. These species include M. dispar (SDO), M. alkalescens (PG31), M. bovirhinus (CS260), M. arginini (630), M. bovuculi (FS8-7), M. bovigenitalium (ATCC 14173), M. verecundum (ATCC 27862), andM. canadense (275C). Acite fluid from MYB 87 reacts with M. agalactiae (GM 139), a rare sheep and goat pathogen highly related to M. bovis, in IFA tests but not in ELISA. Ascite fluid from MYB 163 does not react with M. agalactiae. MYB 63 is of IgG1 Kappa isotype, while MYB 87 is of IgM Kappa isotype. These hybridomas should be useful in the diagnosis and detection of M. bovis and its related diseases.

Stage0.png

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]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195811908Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:39 GMTDescription:]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740False
Hybridoma Cell Lines for the Production of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Mycoplasma Hyopneumoniahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19575Description:
Hybridoma cell lines F1B6 and F2G5 produce monoclonal antibodies which are unique in their ability to inhibit the in vitro adherence of M. hyopneumoniae to swine cilia. The tracheal cilia are the natural targets to which the mycoplasma binds during in vivo infection. The antibodies are important in the characterization of M. hyopneumoniae isolates by immunoblotting and adherence inhibition, and in purification of M. hyopneumoniae adhesins

Application:
- Veterinary diagnostics
- Vaccine quality control
The cell lines are available for non-exclusive licensing.

Intellectual Property:
Tangible material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

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]]>
Fri, 22 May 2015 13:25:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195752050Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:35 GMTDescription:]]>Application:- Vaccine quality control
The cell lines are available for non-exclusive licensing.]]>
Intellectual Property:

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseComputer-Aided Tap Tester (CATT) for Inspection of Composite and Metal Honeycomb Structureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19491Description:
This technology is an instrumented tap test system that provides quantitative, image-based data regarding the mechanical properties of an inspection area. Driven by a laptop PC, the system produces two dimensional images (or "C-scans") that reveal flaws, damages, repairs and substructures in complex bonded structures such as metal honeycomb sandwiches and composite structures. It produces images of the local stiffness of the component, and the stiffness derived from the tap test was shown to agree with that obtained by static load tests. The instrument generates images that reveal the percent reduction in stiffness due to flaws or damage. It has utility in safety inspections for airlines and other industries, as well as application in quality assurance during fabrication.

Advantage:
• Image-based results - improves on earlier tap test methods and instruments that do not have imaging capability.
• Cost-effective.
• Quantitative stiffness data that are structurally meaningful.
• Simple operation with minimal training - no calibration standards required and test results independent of operator.
• High portability - driven by a laptop PC without need of external AC power.
• Manual and mechanized data collection.

Application:
1. Non-destructive testing and inspection of manufacturing-related or service-induced defects, flaws and damages in composite and metal honeycomb structures. 2. Aircraft manufacturers, composite components manufacturers and users, nondestructive instrumentation manufacturers 3. Safety inspections for airlines and other industries; quality control during fabrication of composite structures.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Advanced prototype is complete and available for demonstration. The prototype is expected to require very little development to be brought to market. The manual version had gone through field tests at three airlines and three military bases, and the system is undergoing beta-site tests at American Airlines in Tulsa, OK. The mechanized version is being completed and has also gone through some field tests.

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194912592Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:34 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Non-Destructive Inspections and the Display of Inspection ResultsUtilityUnited States6,327,92109/517,9573/3/200012/11/20013/3/20205/19/201511/13/2017FalseAn Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector System for Soybean Functional Genomicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19386Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved genetic tool for researching and understanding soybean genomics.

Description:
Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a new approach to so-called reverse genetics.  Using this technology, the expression of a known gene (or sequence) is altered and the resulting effect on plant phenotype is investigated.  VIGS is being increasingly used as a reverse genetics tool to study and identify functions of specific plant genes, especially in plants such as soybean that are refractory to other methods, such as transformation.  While RNA-based VIGS vectors have been developed for investigating gene function(s) in soybean, they are subject to RNA degradation, are not facile to manipulation, require in vitro RNA transcription, and are costly and time consuming.  As a result, these systems are not suitable for high-throughput genomics applications.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a highly reliable soybean gene expression and silencing vector. This second generation improvement over a previously described system is based on DNA inoculation and uses a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter driven Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) vector. Because the DNA-based BPMV vector is designed to silence multiple genes using a single construct, simultaneous testing of different combinations of genes to address questions related to genetic redundancy or epistasis is possible.  In addition, the vector can be used in soybean to validate the function of Arabidopsis gene homologues.

Advantage:
• Amenable to high through-put gene manipulation
• Highly efficient: obviates the need for in vitro transcription and infection using unstable RNA inoculation
• Enables silencing of multiple genes using a single construct
• Facilitates functional validation of Arabidopsis gene homologues
• Economical: eliminates the need for chemical stabilization of transcribed RNA

Application:
Soybean functional genomics

References:
C. Zhang, C. Yang, S. Whitham, J. Hill. "Development and Use of an Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector for Soybean". Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Journal. 22(2):123. 2009.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Highly reliable and efficient silencing of a variety of soybean genes, including those required for protein translation, defense signaling pathways, cytoskeleton, and roots, has been demonstrated.  The utility of the DNA-based BPMV VIGS vector in characterizing gene function has been shown using soybean homologues of Arabidopsis defense signaling pathways.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193863585Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:05 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a highly reliable soybean gene expression and silencing vector. This second generation improvement over a previously described system is based on DNA inoculation and uses a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter driven Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) vector. Because the DNA-based BPMV vector is designed to silence multiple genes using a single construct, simultaneous testing of different combinations of genes to address questions related to genetic redundancy or epistasis is possible.  In addition, the vector can be used in soybean to validate the function of Arabidopsis gene homologues.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:C. Zhang, C. Yang, S. Whitham, J. Hill. "Development and Use of an Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector for Soybean". Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Journal. 22(2):123. 2009.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740BPMV-Based Viral Constructs Useful for VIGs and Expression of Heterologous Proteins in LegumesUtilityUnited States8,569,57912/927,57911/18/201010/29/201311/18/20305/13/201511/21/2017FalsePICKY: An Optimal Oligonucleotide Design and Analysis Toolhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19385Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a software tool that makes designing oligo probes for microarrays, or gene chips, easier, faster and with the highest quality. It also analyzes existing probes to detect potential cross-hybridization sites for trouble shooting, data analysis improvement or discovery

Description:
DNA microarrays have enabled detailed studies on gene expression, and are used in drug discovery research, comparative genomics, high throughput screening, diagnostics, and other applications.  However, the design of microarrays is crucial for maximizing experimental results.  To facilitate the design of oligonucleotide (oligos) probes used in microarrays, an ISU researcher has developed PICKY, a software tool for selecting optimal oligos.  PICKY allows the rapid and efficient determination of gene-specific oligos based on a given gene set, and can be used for large, complex genomes, such as human, rice or maize. PICKY can also be used to analyze existing microarray probes and evaluate their design quality. Because PICKY uses rigorous whole genome-based thermodynamic screening to identify hydrogen binding sites, it can be utilized for siRNA (short interference RNA) design for gene knockout applications and for discovery of natural miRNA (microRNA) targets. Non-exclusive free licenses are available for the 32-bit version of PICKY; the 64-bit version of PICKY, which allows bigger gene sets to be analyzed, is freely available to nonprofit users using it for non-commercial purposes, but commercial users will need to pay a licensing fee to license 64-bit version of PICKY for commercial use.

Advantage:
• Rapid (gene probes sets can be designed in only minutes or hours compared to other design tools that take days or weeks for some large genomes)
• Accurate (PICKY considers thermodynamics when selecting oligos, not just sequence similarity) 
• Versatile (may be used to design arrays and siRNAs or to analyze the quality of existing arrays)
• Independent (as a stand-alone program that works on all major computing platforms; PICKY does not require any third party software program to operate)

Application:
Microarray design; oligonucleotide probe and primer design; existing microarray re-analysis; siRNA Design

References:
1: “Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY,” H-H Chou, 2010, BMC Bioinformatics 11:196. PMID: 20406469.

2: “Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays,” H-H Chou, A. Trisiriro, S. Park, YI Hsing, PC Ronald, and PS Schnable, 2009, BMC Bioinformatics 10:347. PMID: 19849862.

3: “PICKY: oligo microarray design for large genomes”, Hui-Hsien Chou, An-Ping Hsia, Denise L. Mooney, Patrick S. Schnable, 2004, Bioinformatics 20:2893-2902. PMID: 15180932.

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4280: High-number Gene Fragment Assembly

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
PICKY version 2.20 has been released, and Macintosh, Unix and PC versions are all available (except the Mac 64-bit version, which will be released later).  Free versions and tutorials are available for download.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193853554Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:04 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY,” H-H Chou, 2010, BMC Bioinformatics 11:196. PMID: 20406469.

2: “Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays,” H-H Chou, A. Trisiriro, S. Park, YI Hsing, PC Ronald, and PS Schnable, 2009, BMC Bioinformatics 10:347. PMID: 19849862.

3: “PICKY: oligo microarray design for large genomes”, Hui-Hsien Chou, An-Ping Hsia, Denise L. Mooney, Patrick S. Schnable, 2004, Bioinformatics 20:2893-2902. PMID: 15180932.

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF 4280: High-number Gene Fragment Assembly

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDifferential ELISA for PRRSV to Distinguish Vaccinated from Infected Animalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19382Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a diagnostic test that can distinguish animals vaccinated for protection against the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from those infected with the virus

Description:
PRRSV is an important pathogen of pigs, and causes hundreds of millions of dollars in losses to pork producers annually in the US alone due to reproductive disorders in sows and respiratory disease in piglets.  Modified live-attenuated vaccines (MLV and ATP) are available to help protect against PRRSV infection, but there are reports of acute PRRSV outbreaks in vaccinated herds with vaccine-like strains of the virus being identified.  This has lead to a need for a rapid assay that can be used for identifying and differentiating these vaccine-like isolates from field isolates of PRRSV.  While commercial diagnostic assays are available for PRRSV, they are unable to differentiate vaccinated animals from those that are naturally infected with the virus, or are too cumbersome and expensive for wide implementation.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based diagnostic assay that distinguishes vaccinated (with MLV) from infected animals.  This assay is based upon antigenic differences in the 2b protein between the commonly used PRRSV vaccine strain and field isolates which can be used as serological markers.  The assay may thus facilitate improved management practices for pork producers.

Advantage:
Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infected

Application:
Veterinary diagnostics

References:
“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
An indirect ELISA has been established and shown to distinguish between the PRRSV 2b protein region from vaccine strains and other isolates, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193823371Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infectedApplication:

]]>References:“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Differential Immunoassay for PRRS Vaccine AntibodyContinuationUnited States8,541,18813/298,77611/17/20119/24/20139/25/20275/13/201511/13/2017FalseSoybean Transformation and Regeneration Using Half-Seed Explantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19379Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a more efficient and robust method for genetic transformation and regeneration of soybeans using half-seed explants of mature soybean seeds.

Description:
Commonly used methods for soybean transformation such as the cotyledonary node (“coty node”) or embryogenic callus (“callus”) method have various disadvantages.  For example, the coty node method requires precise wounding of seedlings to introduce genetic material and in vitro germination that can result in low transformation efficiencies, poor reproducibility and non-germline transformation.  The callus method—in which embryonic tissue is bombarded with DNA-coated carrier particles—has the drawbacks of requiring a prolonged tissue culture period, and can also result in the complex insertion of genes into the plant genome and may result in the regeneration of sterile plants.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU researchers have developed a method for efficient soybean transformation and regeneration using half-seed explants.  In this method, half-seed explants (separated cotyledonous tissues derived from mature soybeans) are infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a transgene of interest and regenerated in vitro using tissue culture medium.  Transgenic plants can be obtained within 9-10 months, and any suitable genotype of soybean can be used with this method.  Because this approach does not require technical precision or prolonged tissue culture, it is more efficient and robust than other soybean transformation methods.

Advantage:
• Efficient (transformation efficiency of 2.4 - 7.8% compared to 0.3 – 2.8% for the coty node method has been demonstrated) 
• Simple (the half-seed method is easy to prepare and does not require a prolonged tissue culture period when compared to the callus culture system)
• Reproducible (does not require precise wounding or particle bombardment, so gene insertion events and transformation are more reliable)

Application:
Soybean transformation

References:
“Improved cotyledonary node method using an alternative explant derived from mature seed for efficient Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation”, M. Paz, J.C. Martinez, A. Kalvig, T. Fonger, and K. Wang, 2006, Plant Cell Reports 25: 206-213.

Supporting Documents:


MS PowerPoint:  Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using “Half-Seed” Explants

Stage5.png
Development Stage:
Transgenic soybean plants derived from the half-seed explants have been produced and confirmed in the R0 and R1 generations through molecular analysis, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193793122Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Improved cotyledonary node method using an alternative explant derived from mature seed for efficient Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation”, M. Paz, J.C. Martinez, A. Kalvig, T. Fonger, and K. Wang, 2006, Plant Cell Reports 25: 206-213.

]]>

]]>Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using “Half-Seed” Explants

]]>Stage5.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using Half-Seed ExplantUtilityUnited States7,473,82211/475,3186/27/20061/6/20098/7/20275/13/201511/13/2017FalseReduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolutionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19688Summary:
The invention is a unique reachability resolution method that has been developed based on the refinement of the hybrid automation such that the reachability is reduced to the reachability in the underlying graph (without the dynamics) whenever the refinement step terminates.  This approach yields a technique that is effective in terms of achieving test coverage and efficient in terms of test generation time.  Software is available for testing.

Description:
Simulink/Stateflow is a popular commercial model-based development tool for many industrial applications.  For safety and security concerns, verification and testing must be performed on the Simulink/Stateflow designs and the generated code.  In this design, a novel test generation approach is presented by reduction to reachability in a Hybrid Automation, with its locations representing the computations of the model, and edges representing the computation-succession.  A unique reachability resolution method has been developed based on the refinement of the hybrid automation such that the reachability is reduced to the reachability in the underlying graph (without the dynamics) whenever the refinement step terminates.  This approach yields a technique that is effective in terms of achieving test coverage and efficient in terms of test generation time.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3739:  Modeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Software


Advantage:
• The problem of eventual executability of a computation path to that of reachability in a discrete-time computation-succession hybrid automation (CS-HA)
• A recursive refinement of CS-HA that preserves reachability to graph connectivity
• An algorithm to obtain a test that eventually executes a reachable computational path.
• Easy integration into Simulink.
• Automatically and efficiently generate test cases for Simulink/Stateflow models with feedback loops

Application:
Applications that requires automatic test generation in model-based development using Simulink/Stateflow

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution”, Meng Li and Ratnesh Kumar, 2013 IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, Madison, WI

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196884266Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3739:  Modeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Software

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution”, Meng Li and Ratnesh Kumar, 2013 IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, Madison, WI]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUtilizing Timing Error Detection and Recovery to Dynamically Improve Superscalar Processor Performance: SPRIT3Ehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19301Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that enables modern high performance computer processors to operate reliably at speeds higher than previously possible.

Description:
Modern processors (and in fact all synchronous logic circuits) use a clock to control execution of the circuit. The speed of this clock, which in large part determines how quickly the processor runs applications, is traditionally limited by worst case delay. The resulting propagation delay is difficult to determine precisely for three main reasons. First, variations induced when computer chips are produced create variable delays in the chips. Second, variations in environmental conditions during operation, such as temperature and voltage, affect the delay through the circuit. Finally, although it is possible to find the longest paths through the logic, it is not known how often the input combinations given during operation will use these paths. To avoid timing errors, traditional design assumes worst case values for these factors, giving an overly high delay estimate, and causing the clock period to be set too slow. To overcome this limitation and increase clock speed, ISU researchers have developed SPRIT3E (Superscalar PeRformance Improvement Through Tolerating Timing Errors). By applying fault tolerance combined with dynamic control theory, this technique performs error detection and correction, and allows clock speeds to scale farther, which in turn lets applications finish earlier. In addition, this method may be applied to any modern processor, since the limitation it overcomes is applicable to all synchronous logic circuits.

Advantage:
• Enables processors to reliably execute applications faster than previously possible
• Performs both error detection and correction (unlike the closest competitor, which performs only error avoidance)
• May be applied to any modern processor, since it overcomes the limitation of the worst case delay assumption that places a minimum on the clock period of modern digital circuits

Application:
High performance processor design; synchronous logic circuit design

 

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:35:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193013421Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Superscale Processor Performance Enhancement Through Reliable Dynamic Clock Frequency TuningUtilityUnited States7,671,62712/107,4154/22/20083/2/20104/22/20285/8/201511/13/2017False1+N Protection for Mesh Networks Using Network Coding on Protection Cycleshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19305Summary:
Optical fiber failures can result in disruptions in communication networks. ISU researchers have developed a technique to provide transparent non-stop service in communication networks while efficiently utilizing resources.

Description:
The advent of optical fibers in communication network backbones has allowed large amounts of bandwidth to be carried on a single fiber. Failure of single fiber, which is not an uncommon occurrence, can therefore affect large numbers of users and connections. Preserving the ability of a network to operate, or network survivability, is thus critical if any part of the network should fail. Current methods for providing optical network survivability include predesigned protection (i.e., 1+1, where a single session is protected by duplicating the resources required by the session) and dynamic restoration (i.e., 1:N, where resources for a single session are shared among N sessions). While 1+1 protection techniques are nearly instantaneous, they require duplication of resources. 1:N techniques are more efficient, since resources for a single session are shared between N sessions. However, these methods are also slower and require management and control planes involvement, since detection of the failure, and determining which session should use the backup facilities are necessary. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a 1+N protection technique for mesh networks that uses network coding on protection cycles. This method is similar to the 1+1, except that one backup circuit is shared between N sessions, and data from all N sessions is transmitted on the backup circuit. The use of the network coding technique results in significants saving over the 1+1 method, while using roughly the same resources required by the 1:N method, but at the speed of the 1+1 method.

Advantage:
• Transparent protection against single link failures.
• Fast protection since no failure detection or switching is involved.
• Reduced bandwidth and resource requirements, since multiple communication sessions use the same resources required to protect a single session.
• Simpler control and management planes.
• Can be implemented at a number of layers.
• Error detection and correction.

Application:
Communications networks

References:
Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Method demonstrated in the laboratory

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193053400Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-47401+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using P-Cycles and Protection PathsUtilityUnited States7,869,34412/323,59811/26/20081/11/20113/11/20295/8/201511/13/2017FalseLeak Detection in Pressure Vessels Using Structure-Borne Noisehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19303Summary:
Use of structure born noise to detect even very small leaks in pressurized vessels

Description:
Micrometeorite impacts on pressure vessels, such as a manned spacecraft, can create small leaks that are too small to detect easily, yet result in significant loss of air over time. While ultrasonic leak detectors are available, conventional designs detect leaks in the ambient atmosphere, and are not effective for detecting leaks into a vacuum because the sound resulting from turbulence downstream of the leak cannot be propagated in space or back into the spacecraft. To overcome this problem, ISU researchers have developed a method for leak detection using structure-borne noise. This method uses cross correlations between ultrasonic leak noise signals measured by two or more sensors to monitor and characterize leak-generated noise and locate the leak. This method may be applicable to the analysis of other pressure vessels, such as aircraft.

Advantage:
• Enables very rapid detection and location of air leaks
• Useful for leak detection in many types of pressure vessels.

Application:
Leak detection in manned space flight and pressure vessels; Nondestructive evaluation

References:
Two-Sensor Ultrasonic Spacecraft Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne Noise”, Stephen D. Holland, Ron Roberts, D.E. Chimenti, and Michael Strei, 2005, Acoustics Research Letters Online 6:63-68.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
A working prototype has been constructed, and ISU is seeking companies interested in licensing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193033289Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Two-Sensor Ultrasonic Spacecraft Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne Noise”, Stephen D. Holland, Ron Roberts, D.E. Chimenti, and Michael Strei, 2005, Acoustics Research Letters Online 6:63-68.
]]>
Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Leak Detection Using Structure-Borne NoiseUtilityUnited States7,739,89911/413,5234/28/20066/22/20101/9/20285/8/201511/13/2017FalseSpherically Focused Air-Coupled Foil Transducerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19315Summary:
A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer

Description:
The use of air-coupled ultrasonic transducers for materials inspection, characterization and ultrasonic imaging is becoming more widespread because it permits non-contact evaluation of materials such as wood, paper, composites, plastics, or any light-weight material, or inspection of large structures. Prior efforts to optimize transducer sensitivity and image resolution have largely involved the use of mirrors and backplates or wafers that result in incomplete focusing, low sensitivity or bandwidth limitations. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer that consists of a thin metallized polymer membrane, a flexible backplate, and a spherically curved backing fixture. The resulting device demonstrates higher signal amplitude, better bandwidth and better spatial resolution than other air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and should lead to improved ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation and imaging. Unlike currently used ultra-sound devices that cannot be focused without mirrors or interference plates, the air-coupled foil transducer enables spherical focusing that concentrates the sound energy, resulting in improved image resolution and enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements

Advantage:
• Inexpensive
• Improved image resolution
• Enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements
• Does not require intermediate optics

Application:
Air-coupled ultrasonic measurement; ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193153209Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:45 GMTSummary:A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducerDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Air-Coupled TransducerUtilityUnited States7,759,84211/913,9214/28/20087/20/20105/26/20265/8/201511/21/2017FalseContext Sensitive Real-Time Data-Driven Music Algorithmshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19311Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a set of algorithms for creating music based on real time data.  This approach allows aural information to be combined with visual cueing to enhance data analysis.

Description:
We live in a world filled with sound and receive a wide range of information aurally. By adding this information to our visual cueing, we more fully understand our environment. Sound directs our viewing and adds essential contextual information.  Because of this, numerous efforts to sonify data—represent data with sound—have been performed.  However, these efforts have mapped data directly to various aspects of sound, causing a result that is difficult to understand or irritating to listen to.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a musical approach to the sonification of data.  Because music can convey a large amount of information, it can enable users to perceive more facets of the data.  This method includes the use of context sensitive grammars, fractal algorithms, and atonal compositional techniques with the result that the music builds in listenability and flexibility for broad applicability to different types of data without external intervention by the composer.  This approach also provides a connection between micro- and macro-scales of the data, thus allowing the user to fully experience its intricacies and interrelationships.  Potential applications of this technique include ambient awareness, exploration of large complex data sets for scientific research and engineering design, augmentation of remote control of tractors or other working machinery, enhancement of viewing of websites or museum displays, use as a composition tool for creating music for performance, and providing an additional information channel during crowd surveillance or other visual targeting/surveillance activities.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with diverse types of data sets)
• Flexible (use of atonal compositional techniques requires less rigid syntax than tonal music and enables real-time sonification)
• Listenable (musical approach creates pleasing aural results)

Application:
Sonfication of data for enhanced analysis and understanding.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A simulation is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193113074Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Creating Realtime Data-Driven Music Using Context Sensitive Grammars and Fractal AlgorithmsUtilityUnited States7,304,22810/985,30111/10/200412/4/200711/10/20245/8/201511/13/2017FalseEnergy-Extraction-Based Active Noise Control Systemhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19299Summary:
Reduction of noise in vehicles, machinery, buildings or other structures is highly desirable, but difficult to achieve because of the complex physical interactions involved.  ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system with potential applications in a variety of industries, such as aircraft, home appliances, automobiles and machinery

Description:
Suppressing noise in home and work environments, such as in buildings, vehicles, engines, appliances, or machinery, is important for comfort and health reasons.  One approach to active noise control is to use adaptive disturbance cancellation techniques. However, effective noise control is hard to accomplish because analytical models for acoustic-structure interactions are difficult to obtain and significant modeling uncertainties persist.  To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

Advantage:
• Reduces noise generated from both structural and acoustic sources
• Achieves uniform broadband reduction in noise and vibration

Application:
Reduction of noise and vibration in acoustic structures for industries such as aircraft, home appliances, engines, and industrial machinery.

References:
“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192993045Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.
]]>
Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise controlUtilityUnited States7,623,99310/731,74212/9/200311/24/200911/27/20265/8/201511/13/2017FalseImproved Robot and Stepper Motor Controlshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19306Summary:
ISU researchers have developed robot and stepper motor control software that contributes to the improved operation of robots

Description:
The Bouton-McConnell Stepper Motor Controller for Vibration-Free Fast Response, involves control techniques that permit stepper motors to behave like closed loop DC motors when implemented using  Robust Vibration Suppression (RVS) control techniques. This control technique enhances noise suppression and can achieve high speeds without sacrificing the control of residual vibrations. It can be applied to currently operating stepper motor systems.

Advantage:
• Robust (minimally affected by system operating dynamics)
• Fast (robot response time is minimized)
• Quiet (permits broad band noise suppression)
• Versatile (can be applied to a variety of control systems)

Application:
Robotic controls; stepper motor control

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
This technology has been applied to a flexible robot arm that moves a large distance in the range of 90 to 180 degrees using a minimal amount of time

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193061832Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsUtilityUnited States6,002,23208/912,2838/15/199712/14/19998/15/20175/8/201511/13/2017Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsContinuationUnited States6,011,37309/303,4624/30/19991/4/20008/15/20175/8/201511/13/2017FalseA Method for Machining Metallic Foamhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19297Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process for cutting metallic foam that eliminates smearing while still allowing custom shapes to be created.

Description:
The present invention relates to a process of cutting metallic foams that eliminates the problem of smeared surfaces. When a traditional machining approach is used, the surface of the material smears, causing the surface pores of the foam to close.  This invention is the first method capable of machining foams using conventional machining processes, rather than non traditional methods such as electrical discharge machining (EDM). EDM is capable of cutting the material without smearing, but is not an easily customizable process. Moreover, recent research has shown that EDM has a detrimental effect on the material properties, in particular, a reduction in porosity. Initial testing of this newly invented process indicates that the porosity of the TM may not be affected using the new approach. This process could enable the creation of custom shaped TM implants of virtually any free-form geometry, using a CT scan derived CAD model of the desired geometry.

Advantage:
• Eliminates smeared surfaces
• Easily customizable
• Does not appear to affect metal porosity
• Can be used with conventional machining techniques

Application:
Machining metallic foams like trabecular metal for applications such as bone implants.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The utility of the method has been demonstrated using trabecular metal and a CAD model of a human femur fracture segment, and Iowa State University is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:43 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192973497Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for Machining Metallic FoamUtilityUnited States9,795,70812/361,8581/29/200910/24/201711/7/203511/13/201711/13/2017FalseChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabricshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19263Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed ChainMap, an algorithm that optimally maps logic chains used in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) to improve their performance

Description:
Look-up table (LUT)-based FPGA have typically been used in prototyping rather than as critical design elements.  However, performance improvements have advanced FPGAs to being valuable in development of end-components.  An important dedicated structure found in currently available architectures is the arithmetic carry chain.  However, in designs that incorporate limited arithmetic operations and contain a carry-select style architecture, the carry chain is an under utilized resource.  To overcome this deficiency, ISU researchers have developed a novel algorithm, ChainMap, for depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in reconfigurable fabrics.  ChainMap establishes a difference between programmable routing connections and chain connections, and optimally identifies them without requiring the use of a user-specified hardware description language (HDL).  In addition, ChainMap allows the use of non-arithmetic as well as arithmetic chains. As a result, significant performance gains are achievable for all designs and design flow is freer.

Advantage:
• Effective (experimental results indicate that ChainMap improves performance up to 40% compared to HDL methods)
• Efficient (allows the use of non-arithmetic operations and does not require the preservation of HDL macros through the design flow)
• Flexible (eliminates the need for HDL to create logic chains and frees the design flow)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The algorithm is available for testing

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192633631Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:“Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

]]>Group:ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable FabricsUtilityUnited States8,661,39412/236,7819/24/20082/25/20141/16/20325/7/201511/13/2017FalseLogic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19262Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a logic element architecture that simplifies generic logic chain operations and improves the functionality of each logic element in programmable devices.

Description:
Reconfigurable fabrics are an important element of reconfigurable computing—systems architecture that offer both performance and flexibility for a broad range of applications—and typically depend on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) which contain programmable logic that allows them to be configured by the designer or customer after manufacturing.  However, compared with application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC), FPGA have lower performance and require increased power consumption.  To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

Advantage:
• Effective (enables carry chain reuse, improving design performance at minimal cost)
• Robust (increases maximum clock frequency by 47% in technology map experiments while reducing utilized routing resources by 13%)
• Efficient (avoids the use of extraneous interconnects since only one wire is needed compared to approaches that require a standard carry chain connection and an additional connection between logic elements)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The logic element architecture is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192623630Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

]]>Advantage:References:“Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

]]>Group:ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devicesUtilityUnited States8,438,52212/237,0769/24/20085/7/20133/17/20315/7/201511/13/2017FalseCloaking with Footprints: A Novel Technique for Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based Serviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19261Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a novel method for location privacy protection so that location information cannot be directly linked to a particular individual through location-based services.

Description:
Location-based services (LBS) require location information from clients.  However, a person’s whereabouts may reveal sensitive private information, such as health condition or political affiliation.  Moreover, location information may make a person physically vulnerable, for example, to a personal threat.  Potential solutions for location privacy protection, such as using a pseudonym in requesting LBSs, does not protect a user’s anonymity because the location information itself may reveal that person’s real-world identity.  To overcome this challenge, ISU researchers have developed a novel cloaking technique for location privacy protection.  This technique uses a footprint—a user's location sample collected at some time point—to depersonalize a user’s location based on their historical location information and cloaking algorithms.  In addition, while the sizes of cloaking boxes produced by the existing approaches are highly dependent on the network density, footprint cloaking enables computation of a minimized cloaking area.  The existing techniques require all mobile users to report current location information; in contrast, this approach only requires the user who requests LBSs to provide location updates.  This eliminates server processing requirements and network loading.  This approach also enables depersonalization of a user’s trajectory as opposed to currently used methods since a time-series sequence of cloaking boxes forms a trajectory that may reveal the real identity of the user if, for example, it links to the user's home and office.  As a result, footprint cloaking is more practical, scalable and can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs)
• Robust (enables fine cloaking resolution)
• Economical (performance studies have shown lower computation and communications costs

Application:
Location privacy protection

References:
Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype is available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192613620Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:32 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesUtilityUnited States8,856,93912/555,4569/8/200910/7/201412/19/20325/8/201511/13/2017Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesDivisionalUnited States9,239,93514/472,4628/29/20141/19/20169/8/20293/8/201711/13/2017Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-based ServicesDivisionalUnited States9,736,68514/976,10912/21/20158/15/20179/8/202910/18/201711/13/2017FalseREBEL: REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic for Cyber Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19260Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new method for ensuring the security of computer-generated transactions.

Description:
The pervasion of computer-based transactions in every day life has led to an increased need for cryptography to ensure that cyber transactions are secure.  Classical methods for encryption/decryption, such as asymmetric RSA encryption/decryption or symmetric block ciphers (for example, NIST standard AES), can take tens of millions of computing cycles that slow the speed of data encryption/decryption.  In addition, these systems also suffer from security vulnerabilities through the use of S-boxes, where public knowledge of S-box constants allows for an adversary to develop static statistical models to exploit them.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

Advantage:
• Rapid (provides encryption and decryption at data rates 10-20 times higher than currently used methods) 
• Secure (S-boxes are not used so the system is not vulnerable to attack mediated by static statistical models)
• Versatile (can be included in hardware in embedded processors used in devices such as cell phones, smart cards (ATM cards), wireless routers, etc.)

Application:
Cyber security; Cryptography

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Data encryption at rates in the vicinity of 128 Gigabits/second has been demonstrated, and security guarantees make the probability of a successful breach near random—many times more secure than the current AES standard.  A computer simulation is available for demonstration.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192603404Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description: ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Reconfigurable Block Encryption LogicUtilityUnited States8,824,67212/101,4114/11/20089/2/20148/2/20315/7/201511/13/2017FalseActive Noise Control System for Use in Noise Cancelling Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19258Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a system for noise control for use in noise cancelling devices such as headphones.

Description:
Reduction of noise in certain work and other environments is important for communication, safety, preservation of hearing, and for personal comfort.  Noise control using passive headsets generally provides substantial broadband noise reduction, but without the ability to selectively control one frequency of noise over another.  In addition, existing active noise control headsets have been limited to control of only low frequencies (less than 1 KHz) but are not able to reduce high frequency noise due to design limitations.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

Advantage:
• Selective (enables the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining desirable frequencies, such as those used for speech)
• Effective (enables mitigation of high frequency noises)
• Versatile (has utility in a wide variety of noisy environments, such dental offices, airplanes, machine shops and manufacturing facilities)

Application:
Noise control

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
An active noise control system consisting of a headset, speaker, microphone and controller has been developed, and large reductions of high frequency tonal noise have been demonstrated experimentally. 

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192583501Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:29 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

]]>Advantage:Application:Noise controlStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Active Noise Control SystemUtilityUnited States9,558,73212/189,9678/12/20081/31/201712/2/20351/31/201711/13/2017FalseDual-Color Auto-Calibration Scanning-Angle Evanescent Field Microscopehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19664Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new microscope that can be used for live cell imaging as well as for examining single molecule dynamics.

Description:
Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is a mode of fluorescence microscopy that has been widely used for live-cell imaging at the interface between a biological sample and a cover slip or tissue culture well.  TIRFM is based on the induction of an evanescent wave in the liquid adjacent to the interface, which is created when reflected light penetrates the interface, propagates parallel to the surface of the plane of incidence, and decays exponentially with distance.  There are two basic TIRFM systems: prism-based and objective based.  Prism-based systems are preferable since they have lower costs, wider range of incident angles, less excitation light scattering, and higher accuracy in the incident angle determination.  However, the prism-based method has geographical constraints on sample manipulation–it is difficult to recalibrate the system manually for all incident angles–and because image reconstruction can be difficult.   To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an innovative dual-color auto-calibration scanning-angle evanescent field microscope that is easier to operate and more reproducible than existing approaches.  This microscope has utility for live-cell imaging to examine cellular organization and dynamic processes that occur in the  cell/ substrate contact regions.  A computer-controlled automatic high-precision calibration procedure is used to find the incident angles in the full range, and this microscope is able to achieve better axial resolution than currently available systems.

Advantage:
• Permits high axial resolution (5-10 nm)
• Provides quick and automatic creation of an evanescent field for any incident angle in the full range
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Allows rapid re-calibration of new samples
• Enables fine adjustment of the optical trapping forces created by the evanescent field

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The new microscope with an automatic high-precision calibration procedure has been tested under laboratory conditions and is available for demonstration. The entire auto calibration procedure was demonstrated to be complete within minutes and incident angles in the full range (from subcritical angles to nearly 90º) with intervals as small as 0.02º were identified.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196643750Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Auto-calibrated Scanning-angle Prism-type Total Internal Reflection Microscopy for Nanometer-precision Axial Position Determination and Optional Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo Total Internal Reflection MicroscopyUtilityUnited States9,012,87213/006,7391/14/20114/21/201512/25/20316/1/201511/13/2017FalseModeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Softwarehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19250Summary: Iowa State University researchers have developed a modeling approach for Simulink diagrams that can be used for further analysis such as test generation and formal verification.

Description:
Simulink is a commercial tool for graphical representation and simulation of dynamic systems, and Simulink/Stateflow (S/S) diagrams can be used to capture time or event-driven dynamics.  Simulation of S/S diagrams can be use to generate sample runs for validation. Further validation can be performed through testing, verification and monitoring, with automated testing, verification and monitoring desirable.  However, current approaches for modeling S/S diagrams in a format amenable to automatic test generation, verification and monitoring are inadequate.  To overcome this limitation, ISU researchers have developed a modeling approach for an industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow diagrams using input/output extended finite automata (I/O-EFA), which is a formal model amenable for analysis.  The input-output behavior of an I/O-EFA model, as defined in terms of a step-trajectory, preserves the input-output behavior of the corresponding Simulink/Stateflow diagram at each sample time.  This approach is recursive and modular that models atomic blocks and recursively and modularly combines such blocks for forming models of more complex Simulink/Stateflow diagrams from the simpler ones.  The modeling approach has utility for automated test generation, verification or monitoring for fault-detection of embedded software developed using Simulink/Stateflow diagrams, or other similar simulation tools such as LabView.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution


Advantage:
• Efficient (modeling is recursive and modular)
• Effective  (amenable to automated test generation for comprehensive coverage such as MCDC or comprehensive verification, monitoring, and fault-detection)
• Versatile (can be applied to industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow)
• Precise (precisely preserves the discrete-time semantics)

References:

Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
This modeling approach is available for testing

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192503739Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:25 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution

]]>Advantage:References:Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Semantic Translation of Time-Driven Simulink Diagrams Using Input/Output Extended Finite AutomataUtilityUnited States8,655,63613/165,9076/22/20112/18/20143/8/20325/8/201511/13/2017Semantic Translation of Stateflow Diagrams into Input/Output Extended Finite Automata and Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow DiagramsCIPUnited States8,849,62613/538,4726/29/20129/30/201411/2/20315/8/201511/13/2017FalseSagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19247Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel fiber-based magneto-optic on-off switch that enables compact, effective, and low cost switching capabilities.

Description:
The growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications, such as communication networks and optical data, has resulted in an increasing need for all-optical switching technologies.  However, the capacity that fiber-optic communications offers is limited by the bottleneck caused by electrical-optical conversions in current systems, and electronic switching approaches are not believed to be sufficient to meet future bandwidth demands.  Magneto-optical fiber-based switches have been viewed as promising for use in optical switches because of their low insertion losses and ease of integration into optical systems.  As part of an effort to develop practical magneto-optical fiber-based switches, ISU researchers have recently created a Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation.  This switch can be used to connect or disconnect a transmitter from a fiber optic network instead of turning the transmitter on or off electronically.  Since electronically controlled switching can take hundreds of microseconds, the ISU switch can help overcome switching bottlenecks.  In addition, since this novel fiber-based magneto-optic switch allows users to closer an optical fiber line when needed, it may enable applications that require compact, effective and low cost switching capabilities.  This switch structure can also be integrated to form a complete and cost-effective optical system as part of a photonic integrated circuit.

Advantage:
• Advantage: Rapid (switching times on the order of 100s nanoseconds are possible
• Simple (integration into silicon-based technology is easier than with existing approaches)
• Economical (has lower insertion loss and power consumption, and is less expensive to implement)

References:
1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
A prototype switch is available for testing

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192473654Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:23 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States8,478,08212/845,9437/29/20107/2/20136/17/20315/8/201511/13/2017FalseLinearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19246Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed fabrication methods for a polarized thermal emitter than can be used to create more efficient thermophotovoltaic devices for power generation.

Description:
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices can be used to generate power from photons, and consist of a thermal emitter and photodiode.  These devices can be used to help overcome limitations of photovoltatic (PV) devices solar cells—since sunlight is composed of many different wavelengths, not all incident photons have an energy larger than the energy band gap (Eg) of the semiconducting material of the photodiode and thus, not all photons can contribute to the photo-current.  If the thermal emitter of a TPV can absorb all incoming photons without discrimination and re-emit photons within a narrow range of energy that is optimized for the Eg of the photodiode, in principle, all energy carried by the incident photons can contribute for electricity generation, which leads results in enhanced energy conversion efficiency.  While thermal radiation from a thermal source is usually unpolarized, a class of micro-structures termed polarized thermal emitters can emit polarized thermal radiation; polarized thermal emitters avoid the energy loss usually incurred by filtering because they preferentially emit photons via their structural anisotropy, and thus can improve the efficiency of TPVs.  ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have now fabricated layer-by-layer photonic crystals that can be used for linearly polarized thermal emission.  This thermal emitter in conjunction with a sub-wavelength grating shows properties that are desirable for polarized thermal emitters for TPVs, including a high extinction ratio and high emissivity.  In addition, the emission range can be tuned by controlling the periodicity of the sub-wavelength grating.  The linearly polarized thermal emitter may thus have utility for improving the efficiency of TPVs used for power generation.

Advantage:
• Highly polarized thermal emission available at normal emergence
• High thermal radiation power
• Tunable emission range

References:
“Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The photonic crystals used to create the polarized thermal emitter have been demonstrated to enable control of both spectral emissivity and polarization in thermal radiation, and samples are available for testing. ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192463583Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

]]>Group:ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals for Linearly-Polarized Thermal Emission and Thermophotovoltaic Device Including SameUtilityUnited States9,400,21912/754,6574/6/20107/26/20164/8/20339/13/201611/13/2017FalseBandwidth Recycling for More Efficient Data Transmissionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19267Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed scheduling algorithms to employ unused bandwidth to improve broadband network efficiency.

Description:
The explosion in the use of the Internet and the need to transfer multimedia data has lead to increasing requirements being placed on communications networks.  Bandwidth, which can be a limited and valuable resource, must be managed efficiently to provide high quality services to users (QoS).  A variety of approaches have been used to meet the demands for QoS while simultaneously providing diversified traffic services, including reservation protocols, traffic shaping, scheduling algorithms, and congestion avoidance.  However, most of these approaches require predicting the amount of incoming traffic, which is difficult to do since video streaming, VoIP, etc. generate data at variable rates. To provide a high QoS, subscriber stations are required to request the needed bandwidth from base stations prior to any transmission of data; subscriber stations often keep reserved bandwidth—even when it is more than the data transmitted—and thus some bandwidth may be wasted.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a network protocol to employ unused bandwidth to improve network efficiency through bandwidth recycling.  This approach utilizes scheduling algorithms to increase the probability of successful recycling.  Since bandwidth recycling does not change the existing bandwidth reservation, it maintains the QoS guarantee and does not introduce any extra delay in data transmission.  In addition, simulation results have demonstrated the potential for bandwidth recycling to improve network throughput by 40%. This technology has utility for any 4G broadband wireless network.

Advantage:
• Accurate (obviates the need for traffic prediction)
• Efficient (wasted bandwidth can be utilized immediately to improve network throughput)
• Economical (bandwidth recycling introduces limited overhead)
• Versatile (enhances QoS for both WiMax and LTE networks)

Application:
Communications networks

References:
1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Simulation results demonstrate that bandwidth recycling can improve network throughput by 40% and decrease data latency, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 14:16:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192673804Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Bandwidth Recycling in NetworksUtilityUnited States8,737,42913/084,7044/12/20115/27/201411/1/20325/7/201511/13/2017FalseImproved Eddy Current Coil Design for Nondestructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19209Summary:
Researchers have developed an improved design and method for making eddy current coils that are used in eddy current sensing probes for nondestructive testing.

Description:
Eddy current sensing has been a staple in techniques used for nondestructive evaluation of critical components such as air frames or engine parts. Coils used for eddy current sensing probes have traditionally been formed by hand by winding a wire a number of times around a core.  However, this approach to forming coils leads to variations in number of turns in a coil, spacing between the turns, and alignment of turns on the core, resulting in high variability in the coils and the eddy current sensing probes.  The significant variability of eddy current probe sensitivity has been recognized as an important issue for decades, and yet no satisfactory resolution has been found to date.  To address this issue, Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved eddy current coil design and fabrication procedure in which the coil is formed through depositing film traces. This process is amenable to machine manufacturing and provides more precision and uniformity in the coils, thus reducing their performance variability.  In addition, this method may enable the manufacture of probes that are smaller and more sensitive, and may be used for probes that have a single coil or a sensor array.

Advantage:
• Consistent (probes fabricated from these coils will give highly reproducible results)
• Simple (fabrication method is amenable to automation and avoids tedious forming by hand)
• Versatile (probe elements of various sizes can be produced)

Application:
Nondestructive evaluation

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192093062Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:18 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Forming Coil for Use in Eddy Current Sensing ProbeUtilityUnited States7,795,86311/064,3252/23/20059/14/20104/12/20285/7/201511/13/2017FalseSpurious-Noise-Free Switching Power Converterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19207Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a new control scheme for switching power converters that makes them suitable for powering noise-sensitive loads, such as analog and RF (radio frequency) applications.

Description:
Switching power converters are extensively used in electronic devices because of their high power conversion efficiency. However, the spurious output noise they create due to periodic switching precludes their use for noise-sensitive loads—particularly analog and RF load types. Traditionally, linear regulators have been used to mitigate this problem, but can result in much lower power efficiencies. Spread-Spectrum control techniques, such as Σ-Δ and Δ modulation, can be used to reduce the spurious noise in switching power converters, but result in large wide-band increase in the noise floor, while random frequency hopping techniques reduce the spur level at the expense of generating multiple additional spurs. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new PWM control scheme for switching regulators that combines phase chopping with random frequency hopping to achieve completely spur-free operation, while delivering low output noise floor with no sub-harmonics due to hopping. The proposed architecture is very attractive for designing generic low-noise power supplies for spur-sensitive loads, as well as loads sensitive to the random noise floor without post linear regulation, extra passive filtering, or customization for each load. This results in much better power efficiency and reduced implementation size and cost. Moreover, since spur-elimination is based on the fundamental switching behavior of the regulator, spur-free operation is accomplished not only at the output, but at every node in the regulator including the input power and ground rails and the substrate. This significantly reduces Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and facilitates integration of switching regulators in mixed-signal Systems-on-Chip (SoCs) without interfering with other sensitive circuits that share the same substrate or power rails. The performance achieved by this novel control scheme makes switching power converters suitable for directly powering many noise-sensitive analog and RF applications, such as RF mixers, RF Low Noise Amplifiers, and RF Power Amplifiers. Additionally, the proposed architecture can be used for implementing class-D amplifiers with reduced EMI filters, and supply modulators for RF Polar Power Amplifiers. The proposed scheme constitutes minimal area, power, and design effort beyond traditional single-switching-frequency PWM-controlled design, and can be easily incorporated with an already existing regulator.

Advantage:
• Versatile (has utility for many noise-sensitive applications)
• Economical (reduces size, cost and power consumption)
• Efficient (obviates the need for post filtering stages and may extend battery life in portable applications)
• Integrate-able (can be easily integrated on the same chip with other noise-sensitive circuits without affecting their performance)

Application:
Switching power converters; power amplifier supply modulator

References:
1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The converter has been demonstrated to eliminate spurs and have a very low noise floor when implemented in 0.35 µM standard CMOS technology, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192073870Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System and Method for Providing Power via a Spurious-Noise-Free Switching DeviceUtilityUnited States8,901,90513/397,2512/15/201212/2/201410/19/20325/5/201511/13/2017FalseIntegrated Phased Array Antennahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19206Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a phased array antenna system with improved spatial control for wireless communications.

Description:
Phased array antenna systems have many applications in wireless communications—particularly MIMO Communications (multiple input and multiple output).  By using multiple antennas to transmit and receive the signal, the transmit rate can be optimized to the capacity limit of the channel while simultaneously improving security.  Phased arrays steer the main beam of an antenna in a given angular direction in the line-of-sight (LOS) path reducing multipath effects. However, accurate adjustability of the phase and amplitude characteristics for each element of a phased array can be problematic, resulting in less than optimal control of beam patterns that can cause interference in areas of with intense use of wireless communications. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an integrated phased array antenna system that allows for spatial control of the received and transmitting antenna by controlling the phases and amplitude of each radiating element using baseband phase shifting, which is up converted to RF (radio frequency) using a phase lock loop (PLL) synthesizer.  As a consequence, the costs associated with performing phase shifting in the RF region, which was done previously, are mitigated and antenna performance is improved. The integrated phased array antenna has utility for applications such as wireless communications and networking, commercial and military radar, and space-time adaptive communications.

Advantage:
• Economical (lowers operating costs)
• Effective (enables accurate control of beam pattern of the array)

Application:
Communications and wireless networking

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192063587Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:16 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Phased Array System Using Baseband Phase ShiftingUtilityUnited States8,013,79112/182,6787/30/20089/6/20111/30/20295/7/201511/13/2017FalseNovel Method for Wide Field-View Imaginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19662Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has developed a compact device that enables very wide field of view imaging and may lay the foundation for artificial eyes that mimic those of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod.

Description:
Imaging devices with very wide field-of-view (FOV) have many potential applications, including endoscopes for biomedical applications, robotics and automation, and in security and assistive technologies.  For many of these applications, having a light weight, compact device is highly desirable.  However, many wide FOV devices that have been developed are based on conventional optics and tend to be bulky and heavy.  Other development efforts have focused on mimicking solutions found in nature such as artificial compound eyes found in insects and crustaceans.  However, the realization of biomimetic artificial eyes has not been entirely successful due to the difficulty in assembling the compound eye’s vision units hemispherically as well as the difficulty in optically connecting the curved optical front-end (i.e., the microlenses, spacers and incidence angle-discriminating elements) to a flat detector array.  To overcome these obstacles, an ISU researcher has developed a MEMS (micro-electrical-mechanical systems) imaging system that mimics the compound eye of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod which uses polymer fibers to provide flexible optical connections between the microlenses and photodetectors.  In addition to providing a hemispherical imaging of panoramic objects, this system has the potential to enable dynamically tunable FOV and is fabricated using soft lithographic replica-molding techniques amenable to mass production.  As a consequence, this imaging system may be useful for a wide variety of applications, including biomedical instrumentation, surveillance, and assistive devices.

Advantage:
• Simpler fabrication
• Multi-functionality
• Dynamic control of the field-of-view

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A membrane with a “fibers in a chamber” structure has been fabricated and shown to respond well to both inflation and deflation actuations; in addition, HeNe beams passed through the fibers have shown that they function as waveguides, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196623788Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:05 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Elastomeric Device for Tunable ImagingUtilityUnited States8,351,10613/180,6687/12/20111/8/20137/12/20316/1/201511/13/2017FalseInterferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switchinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19138Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an optical switch capable of submicrosecond switching that may help meet the growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications.

Description:
Demand for optical data and communication networks continues to grow, and as a consequence, so does the need for high speed, high bandwidth switching technologies.  The development of all optical switching technologies has seen increased focus to help meet performance demands and the need for ultrafast signal processing. Magneto-optical switches have been investigated for optical switching applications because of their low insertion loss and ability to be integrated into optical systems.  However, magneto-optical switches have previously had slow switching times, on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an interferometric fiber switch which utilizes a magneto-optic Faraday rotator (MOFR). This system uses generation of a magnetic field via a magnetic pulse circuit to achieve high speed switching, on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. As a consequence, this optical switch may have utility for applications such as fiber-optic communications.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

Advantage:
• High speed (capable of switching speeds on the order of 100 ns)
• High stability (Sagnac configuration allows short path length and matched interferometric paths)
• Versatile (switch may either have a latching or nonlatching configuration)

Application:
Fiber optics communications; high capacity data networks

References:
“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

 

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:22 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191383977Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:04 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Advanced Drive Circuitry for Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States9,110,31713/440,3554/5/20128/18/20153/1/20348/18/201511/13/2017FalseMethod and System for Manufacturing an Article Using Portable Hand-Held Toolshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19123Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for avoiding manufacturing mistakes by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools that are used during assembly.

Description:
During various manufacturing steps, such as assembly, welding, and painting, it is often necessary for a worker to use a hand-held tool.  However, it can be difficult, if not impossible, for a worker to consistently duplicate exact work from one assembly to another assembly.  For example, assembly lines often require many threaded fasteners to be assembled using a torque gun at a single workstation.  While currently used control systems can count the number of times the torque gun reaches the required torque value, they cannot determine if all the fasteners were tightened, or if some were tightened twice, or if the fasteners were tightened in a specific sequence, leading to the possibility of manufacturing mistakes.  To overcome this drawback, researchers have developed a method and system that not only can determine whether a particular manufacturing operation is carried out, but also determine whether the operation was carried out at the correct location and/or in the correct sequence. The system also provides feedback about the task completion status and the quality of the finished product.

Advantage:
• Detects and prevents mistakes during the manufacturing process by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools in real time and providing feedback in the event that the manufacturing process is not proceeding as prescribed.

Application:
Manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:

Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191233594Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:ManufacturingPatent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDevice to Determine Susceptibility to Root Lodginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19214Summary:
Researchers have developed a device that can be used to measure root lodging susceptibility in corn.

Description:
Corn is one of the most important and valuable crops grown in the US.  Because of its significance to agriculture, corn breeders strive to develop corn hybrids that are agronomically sound, with traits such as insect and disease resistance, tolerance for heat and drought, and high yield.  Mechanical harvesting of corn also demands that plants be uniform in growth rate, stand establishment, and size. In order for corn plants to stand tall and withstand various mechanical forces applied to the stalk, such as wind, rain, or harvesting equipment, it is important for the plant stalk to have good mechanical properties and be firmly anchored in the soil by its roots; traits such as stalk lodging and root lodging are related to the plant’s mechanical properties. Stalk lodging is breakage of the stalk below the ear while root lodging is where a plant leans away from the vertical access at a 30 degree angle or greater. Researchers have now developed a device that can be used to can be used to measure a corn hybrid’s susceptibility to root lodging earlier in the development of cycle of a new hybrid when fewer plants may be available for testing.  This device pushes on a corn stalk to simulate root lodging; it measures the vibration as force is exerted on the stalk and breakage occurs, and records the data. Thus, accurate comparisons among hybrids without the need to wait for wind or other environmental event to measure lodging are enabled. In addition, this handheld device is portable and easy to use, making it suitable for routine field testing.

Advantage:
• Enables testing for root lodging susceptibility earlier in the corn hybrid development cycle
• Allows for quantitative measurement of root lodging susceptibility and hybrid to hybrid comparisons
• Hand held and portable for easy field testing

Application:
Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodging

Other Patent:
Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926

Development Stage:
The device has been tested under a variety of soil conditions and plant maturity levels and has been shown to distinguish between strong and weak corn hybrids.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 11:02:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192143589Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodgingOther Patent:Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926]]>Development Stage:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Correlating Push Force and Stalk Vibration to a Plant's Susceptibility to Root LodgingUtilityUnited States7,987,73512/577,32910/12/20098/2/201112/26/20295/5/201511/13/2017FalseAdvanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19133Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a tool for simplification of designing and assessing complex parts, termed Advanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS). 

Description:
Current  interfaces used for conceptual design complex products suffer from difficult to use interfaces, unnecessary inputs, and inability to handle the large amount of uncertainty present at this early stage of product design; moreover, these interfaces allow engineers to only investigate a small number of designs before moving onto more detailed phases of design.  To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed ASDS, which can be used for initial product conceptualization with user-friendly interface that allows concepts to be created and assessed in minutes with a set of tools to compute center of gravity, tipping angle, wheel loading, and measurements.  In addition, full CAD models can be decimated and imported into ASDS for conceptual manipulation.  ASDS also includes a virtual reality component in which engineers and designers can view concepts in full immersive, stereoscopic 3D.

Advantage:
• Easy to use interface
• Pre-processed CAD files can be imported to evaluation and conceptualization
• Enables design concepts to be viewed in immersive VR environment
• Minimal expertise needed for use

Application:
Manufacturing; product lifecycle management

Development Stage:
Stage4.png
ASDS is ready for commercialization, and ISU is seeking licensees for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191334006Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:Manufacturing; product lifecycle managementDevelopment Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseStanding Wave Axial Nanometry (SWAN) for Superresolution Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19669Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have an approach for performing 3-D measurements of single molecules with nanometer accuracy and precision.

Description:
Despite its importance as a research tool for understanding cellular functions, the optical resolution of light microscopy has imposed limitations on observing and measuring cellular components and structures. The advent of superresolution microscopy techniques, which enable imaging of nanostructures and processes at X-Y resolutions of approximately 20 nm, opens new opportunities for exploring cell biology and has many other applications.  However, current superresolution microscopy approaches may have limitations with respect to whether live or fixed cells can be imaged because of image acquisition and processing speed, and may also have limitations in terms of resolution along the Z axis.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new technique call SWAN (standing wave axial nanometry) for determining the axial location of nanoscale fluorescent objects with sub-nanometer accuracy and several nanometer precision.  Unlike other approaches, SWAN does not require custom optics or specially engineered substrates, which makes it easy to use with biological samples and live cells. SWAN can be easily integrated with other super-resolution and super-accuracy techniques to image with nanometer resolution along the lateral and axial directions.  As a consequence, this approach has broad utility for a variety of applications, such as life science research (e.g., biomolecular interactions, structure-function studies, cell imaging), drug discovery (e.g., direct observation of targeted drug delivery and drug interactions in vitro and in living cells and tissues), nanotechnology (e.g., characterization of nanoscale materials), material science (characterization of materials with novel optical properties), and optical MEMs devices by improving their efficiency through more accurate and precise imaging.

Advantage:
• Can be used with biological materials and living cells
• Extends working range
• Enables imaging with nanometer resolution along lateral and axial directions
• Does not require custom optics
• Can be used for single molecule AFM force measurement

Application:
Imaging for life sciences research, drug discovery, nanotechnology, materials science and optical MEMS devices.

References:
“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

Development Stage:
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Proof-of-concept and utility has been demonstrated by using SWAN to measure the orientation of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths that were tethered to surfaces with different functionalities.  Commercialization partners are being sought for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196694045Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:56 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and PrecisionUtilityUnited States9,103,78414/081,52211/15/20138/11/201511/15/20338/12/201511/13/2017FalseCry3Bb1-Resistant Strains of Western Corn Rootworm - Hopkinton Strainhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19125Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has identified a strain of western corn rootworm that is resistant to Bt toxin Cry3Bvb1, and this strain can be used for probing the basis of resistance and for developing new management strategies.

Description:
The western corn rootworm is among the most damaging pests of corn crops.  Control costs and economic losses together total over $1 billion annually in the US.  However, the western corn rootworm has overcome conventional strategies such as crop rotation and small molecule insecticides by developing resistance.  While some soil insecticides still afford acceptable protection levels, their potential to cause environmental damage and human health risks has led to the development of transgenic corn lines expressing Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) toxin genes for rootworm control. As more and more transgenic corn with the Bt is grown in the US, the ability to monitor pests for resistance becomes increasingly important.  In addition, understanding the mechanisms that lead to development of pest resistance to Bt corn is important for maximizing the utility of this trait as well as for the development of new management technologies.  As part of a research program related to adaptation by pests to crop rotation and to genetically modified corn that produces insecticidal (Bt) toxins, an ISU investigator has identified populations of western corn rootworm resistant to the Cry3Bb1 protein, the first Bt trait available in the market place.  These populations have subsequently been developed into laboratory strains that may have utility for understanding the genetics and molecular basis of resistance to Bt corn in corn rootworms, as well as for the development of new management technologies for Bt resistant rootworms.

Advantage:
• Laboratory adapted so that multiple generations may be raised per year
• May enable better understanding of resistance mechanisms
• May enable development of new management strategies

Application:
Bt resistance monitoring and management

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Development Stage:
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Ready for commercialization:  field isolates have been adapted into laboratory strains suitable for propagating multiple generations per year for probing resistance mechanisms and management of resistant populations.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191254049Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) toxin genes for rootworm control. As more and more transgenic corn with the Bt is grown in the US, the ability to monitor pests for resistance becomes increasingly important.  In addition, understanding the mechanisms that lead to development of pest resistance to Bt corn is important for maximizing the utility of this trait as well as for the development of new management technologies.  As part of a research program related to adaptation by pests to crop rotation and to genetically modified corn that produces insecticidal (Bt) toxins, an ISU investigator has identified populations of western corn rootworm resistant to the Cry3Bb1 protein, the first Bt trait available in the market place.  These populations have subsequently been developed into laboratory strains that may have utility for understanding the genetics and molecular basis of resistance to Bt corn in corn rootworms, as well as for the development of new management technologies for Bt resistant rootworms.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Development Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseConcentric Coplanar and Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Non-Destructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19660Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed concentric coplanar and arc-Electrode capacitive sensors with applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered dielectric structures.

Description:
With advanced composites being used in aircraft, vehicles, and shipbuilding, demand for dielectric measurements has been increasing in recent years, as these types of measurements can be used to characterize a wide variety of materials, including thin films, substrates, circuit boards, semisolids, etc.  Capacitance methods have been used to characterize materials because of their simplicity, high accuracy, and relatively low cost.  ISU researchers have developed novel concentric coplanar and arc-electrode capacitive sensors that have utility for material characterization and non-destructive evaluation.  The coplanar sensor--   which has the advantage of rotational symmetry-- exhibits a strong measurable outcome capacitance and has various applications, including quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered planar dielectric structures.  For example, the concentric coplanar capacitive sensor could be used to detect water or excessive inhomogeneities caused by repairs in modern radome structures.  The arc-electrode capacitive sensor also exhibits a strong measurable output capacitance, and has applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered cylindrical dielectric structures, such as the wiring found in aircraft.  This technology is available for non-exclusive licensing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Advantage:
• The measurement technique employed for these sensors provides a quantitative relationship between the measurable sensor output capacitance and the material and structural properties of the material under test. Various measurement instruments, handheld capacitive sensors for example, can be developed based on this technology to quantitatively characterize the material and structural properties of multi-layered dielectric materials.

Application:
Non-destructive evaluation; material characterization

References:
T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196603815Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor System With Quantitative ModelUtilityUnited States8,791,70713/185,1567/18/20117/29/20148/19/20326/1/201511/20/2017FalseMicroscope for Simultaneous Single Molecule AFM and Fluorescence Measurementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19117Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an integrated single molecule atomic force fluorescence microscope (smAFM-FM) that can perform multiple single molecule measurements.

Description:
Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy Transfer (FRET) and single molecule force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) are two widely used and powerful techniques that have advanced research in the biological sciences. However each of these techniques suffers from limitations in terms of the types of single molecule measurements they can perform.  For instance, it is difficult to examine structural changes in molecules as they interact using a stand-alone AFM, while when using FRET alone, it is difficult to monitor optical changes in materials when forces are applied.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microscope that combines a single molecule AFM-FRET approach to study molecules and nanoscale objects.  This new instrument enables multiple single molecule measurements, including AFM-FRET intensity and lifetime measurements, AFM-fluorescence intensity and spectral measurements, AFM-photon antibunching experiments, and AFM-Raman measurements.  The smAFM-FM has potential applications for life science research (such as determining the structure and dynamics of molecular interactions of biomolecules), drug discovery (such as direct observation of drug delivery and drug-target interactions in vitro and in cells or tissues), characterization of the optical properties of nanomaterials such as nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, nanotubes, etc., material science, and the optical MEMs industry (design of optical switches, pressure sensors, disk-drive, heads and biosensors). The utility of the smAFM-FM has been demonstrated by measuring the force dependence of the optical properties of CdS/CdSe tetrapod, an important semiconductor nanocrystal.

Advantage:
• Combines the features and benefits of AFM and FRET microscopy to apply forces on single molecules or nanoscale objects and simultaneously monitor their structure, dynamics and optical properties.

Application:
Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.

Development Stage:
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Proof of concept has been demonstrated using the smAFM-FM instrument to measure force-dependent optical properties of nano-scale objects, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191173855Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System, Apparatus, and Method for Simultaneous Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence MeasurementsUtilityUnited States8,656,51013/569,9278/8/20122/18/20148/8/20325/4/201511/13/2017FalseImmunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Researchhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19191Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified pigs that have a severely impaired immune system that could serve as important biomedical model for the study of immune system and other diseases in humans.

Description:
Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a genetic defect that causes newborn animals to lack T or B cells in circulation and to have few or no lymphocytes in their primary or secondary lymphoid tissues.  SCID has been shown to have an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in certain mouse strains as well as in horses, some dog breeds, and humans, but is perhaps best known as the ‘bubble boy’ disease, which is an X-linked version of SCID in humans.  Affected neonates do not show clinical manifestations of the defect while suckling.  However, as maternal antibody wanes, the animals become susceptible to opportunistic infections to which they inexorably succumb. ISU researchers and their colleagues at Kansas State University have recently identified a SCID-like syndrome in a line of pigs originally bred for traits related to feed efficiency.  Because of the closer physiological resemblance between humans and pigs, these animals may have utility as a biomedical model for SCID and immunodeficiency diseases in humans that is more suitable than the current mouse models.  In addition, the anatomical and physiological similarities between humans and pigs would make these SCID pigs a superior biomedical model for research into cell and tissue transplantation, cancer research and efficacy of chemotherapeutics, as well as for testing new vaccines.

Advantage:
• More clinically relevant model for investigation of human immunodeficiency, cancer, and other diseases

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

Development Stage:
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Matings that produced the affected pigs have been repeated and all litters have been confirmed to have at least one affected pig; genotyping analysis is in process.  ISU is seeking commercialization partners for these valuable research animals.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191913992Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

]]>Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePneumatic Vibration Isolation Devicehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19106Summary:
Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

Description:
Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

Advantage:
• Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events
• Low cost
• Improves ride performance

Application:
Vehicle suspensions

References:
1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

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]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191063492Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:47 GMTSummary:Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

]]>Description:Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

]]>Advantage:Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events ]]>Low cost ]]>Improves ride performance]]>Application:Vehicle suspensions

]]>References:1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Pneumatic Vibration Isolation DeviceUtilityUnited States8,302,94412/173,0637/15/200811/6/20129/6/20315/3/201511/13/2017FalseNanoparticles Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acids and Chemicals in Plantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19659Summary:
Gene delivery to plant cells is critical for understanding plant physiology and to develop new varieties with special traits.  ISU researchers have developed a novel method in plants useful for: 1) genetic transformation; 2) simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules; and 3) controlled release of small molecules using appropriate induction reagents.

Description:
Current methods of plant genetic transformation include electroporation, polyethylene glycol or Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, or a bombardment approach using metal particles.  However, none of these techniques are able to provide simultaneous delivery of both nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) and chemicals or drugs to plant cells.  These methods also do not permit targeting of non-nuclear genomes (e.g., plastids or mitochondria) or sub-cellular compartments for delivery of nucleic acids and/or other compounds.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have recently developed a method for plant genetic transformation using mesoporous silicate nanoparticles.  Because these hollow nanoparticles can be capped, controlled release and simultaneous delivery of nucleic acid and chemicals is possible.  In addition, modification of the nanoparticles with peptides or proteins can be used to direct their sub-cellular location through the cellular addressing machinery or other receptor-ligand interactions.  The utility of this method has been demonstrated using a green fluorescent protein reporter construct and tobacco plant cells.

Advantage:
• Enables simultaneous delivery of DNA and chemicals or small molecules
• Allows controlled release of nucleic acid and/or chemicals
• Targets both nuclear and non-nuclear (organelle) genomes

Application:
Transient and stable genetic transformation of plants. Simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules for functional genomic studies. Controlled release of small molecules in planta using appropriate induction reagents.

References:
1: “A polyamidoamine dendrimer-capped mesoporous silica nanosphere-based gene transfection reagent”, Radu, D.R., Lai, C.Y., Jeftinija, K., Rowe, E.W., Lin V.-S.  J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2004) 126, 13216-7.

Development Stage:
The utility of this method was demonstrated with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and immature maize embryos.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196593383Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:23 GMTSummary:Gene delivery to plant cells is critical for understanding plant physiology and to develop new varieties with special traits.  ISU researchers have developed a novel method in plants useful for: 1) genetic transformation; 2) simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules; and 3) controlled release of small molecules using appropriate induction reagents.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Enables simultaneous delivery of DNA and chemicals or small molecules]]>Allows controlled release of nucleic acid and/or chemicals]]>Targets both nuclear and non-nuclear (organelle) genomes]]>Application:Transient and stable genetic transformation of plants. Simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules for functional genomic studies. Controlled release of small molecules in planta using appropriate induction reagents.

]]>References:1: “A polyamidoamine dendrimer-capped mesoporous silica nanosphere-based gene transfection reagent”, Radu, D.R., Lai, C.Y., Jeftinija, K., Rowe, E.W., Lin V.-S.  J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2004) 126, 13216-7.

]]>Development Stage:The utility of this method was demonstrated with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and immature maize embryos.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Methods of Using Capped Mesoporous SilicatesUtilityUnited States8,647,64411/788,1474/19/20072/11/20144/19/20276/1/201511/13/2017False