Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:29:25 GMTThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:29:25 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityLow-Cost Production Method for Alloys Used in Harsh Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19434Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a series of alloy design and powder or spray processing steps that lead to the low-cost production of oxidation or corrosion resistant metallic alloys.

Description:
Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure to corrosive gases; these alloys must also be able to resist high cycle fatigue, extreme surface wear, and long-term creep deformation.  Iron (Fe)-based superalloys have been developed through a mechanical alloying process that results in a dispersoid strengthened metallic material.  However, mechanical alloying can add significant costs for making alloys that perform well in high temperature environments because it requires expensive milling equipment and extensive milling time; thus commercial applications may be limited.  The long milling time required can also lead to contamination within the alloy powders.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames laboratory researchers have developed a method of making dispersoid strengthened, corrosion/oxidation resistant atomized alloy powder particles for high temperature structural applications.  The method employs gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) linked with alloy design and atomizing parameters to result in the low-cost production of corrosion and/or oxidation resistant metallic alloy particles which are strengthened by disperoids that are highly resistant to coarsening and strength degradation at elevated temperatures.  This new molten metal processing technique can thus result in precision parts with superior properties.

Advantage:
• Economical (simplified process reduces costs and eliminates mechanical alloying process)
• Scalable (commercial productions rates are higher than those for mechanical alloying)
• Effective (enables control of batch-to-batch variation and contamination)

Application:
Powder Metallury Processing

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Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

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Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:27 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194343362Tue, 21 Nov 2017 07:54:09 GMTSummary:

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingUtilityUnited States7,699,90511/429,9185/8/20064/20/201012/29/20275/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingCIPUnited States8,603,21312/072,2982/25/200812/10/201311/14/20285/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,197,57412/660,3542/25/20106/12/20125/8/20265/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,864,87013/506,6835/9/201210/21/20146/17/20265/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States9,782,82714/121,4159/3/201410/10/201711/21/201711/21/2017FalseSelective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Productshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19196Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for utilizing ozone for oxidation of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes that enables a rapid and controlled rate of catalysis and is also an environmentally friendly and versatile technology.

Description:
Ozone is recognized as a potent and effective oxidizing agent with numerous commercial uses, including use as an industrial oxidant and water treatment.  Building on research related to iron catalysis in oxidations by ozone, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an approach for selective oxidation in an environmentally friendly manner to obtain industrially important aldehydes and ketones. Because this approach uses mild reaction conditions and eliminates toxic waste compounds, it may have utility for the production of aldehydes and ketones, whose versatile properties make them valuable starting materials for numerous products.

Advantage:
• Rapid and controlled rate of catalysis
• Environmentally friendly: ozone naturally decomposes to oxygen)
• Versatile: may be used for any applications and/or substrates for which ozone is used as an oxidant)

Application:
Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones.

References:
"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

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Development Stage:
This technology has been tested and proven effective, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191963901Tue, 21 Nov 2017 07:47:02 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized ProductsUtilityUnited States8,507,73013/434,9003/30/20128/13/20133/30/20325/5/201511/13/2017FalseUse of Flexible Capacitive Strain Gauges in Tireshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19683Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have utilized soft, flexible capacitive strain gauges to report real-time changes in tire shape.  This information can provide information regarding tire slip, changes in driving surface and structural health of the tire.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the use of pliant capacitive strain sensors to monitor flexure in automotive tires.  The strain sensors, previously patented by MIT (U.S. Patent 8,384,398), are inexpensive to manufacture, responsive to small amounts of strain, and can easily be deployed around the entire interior circumference of the tire.  Information from the sensors could be used to monitor the structural health of the tire, terrain conditions, tire slip, over-inflation, loss of contact with the driving surface, and more.  Feedback can inform the driver of imminent failure and deteriorating road conditions, with application in personal, commercial and industrial vehicles.

Advantage:
• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall
• Sensitive to small amounts of stress

Application:
Tire monitoring to enhance the safety and controllability of vehicles

Development Stage:
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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196834124Mon, 20 Nov 2017 13:13:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall]]>• Sensitive to small amounts of stress]]>Application:

]]>]]>]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Tire Sensing Method for Enhanced Safety and Controllability of VehiclesUtilityUnited States9,815,34314/733,6406/8/201511/14/20177/26/203511/20/201711/20/2017FalseAlignment Promoted in Heat Treatable Magnets Through Application of External Applied Magnetic Field at the Start of Binder-Assisted Moldinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26602Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to produce sintered, final-shape magnets with high density and aligned microstructure.  The resulting permanent magnets feature higher energy product and improved remanence versus standard processing, with improved performance in motors and generators.

Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to create AlNiCo magnets in near final shape with improved energy product and remanence versus magnets produced without using directional solidification or zone refinement.  Magnets resulting from this process are characterized by highly controlled and aligned microstructure in the solid state.  Magnet alloy precursor powder is aligned while being added to the mold, with compression molding locking the aligned particles in place.  The resulting microstructural template for grain growth persists through a thermal de-binding treatment and sintering of the magnet.

Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

Advantage:
• Near net-shape production of permanent magnets with high anisotropy and energy product.
• Compatible with techniques to enhance alignment through application of uni-axial loading during sintering.
• De-binding and sintering removes binder material, leaving a highly-dense anisotropic sintered magnet.

Application:
Permanent magnets, especially for motors and electrical generators.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/266024695Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Protein Synthases for the Production of Bi-Functional Fatty Acidshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21833Summary:
ISU researchers have developed biocatalysts that make bi-functionalized molecules (fatty acids) and a recombinant bacterial expression system.

Description:
Fatty acids normally synthesized in biological systems have only one functional group, carboxylic acid, which is found at the alpha end of the molecule. Bi-functional fatty acids, where there is also a functional group at the omega end of the molecule, are desirable for industrial applications, but are produced by only a few natural systems and at levels that are too low for practical replacement of petroleum-based sources of monomers.  Approaches that enable larger scale production of bi-functional fatty acids will help drive the use of bio-based chemicals. The technology addresses the need for efficient production of bi-functionalized fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the bio-based production of polymers, surfactants, and various specialty chemicals and has the potential to serve as the basis of development of tailored enzymes that are designed to incorporate different functionalities into fatty acids to produce a range of bi-functionalized precursor molecules.

Advantage:
• Produces bi-functional fatty acids
• Replacement for petroleum-based sources of monomers
• Serves a precursor for a wide variety of specialty chemicals, polymers, and surfactants
• Very lucrative market

Application:
Bio-based chemicals, Specialty chemicals

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:41:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218334083Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:15:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

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]]>Application:Bio-based chemicals, Specialty chemicalsPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials and Methods for Characterizing and Using KASIII for Production of Bi-Functional Fatty AcidsUtilityUnited States9,809,80414/762,7917/29/201511/7/20177/29/203511/15/201711/21/2017FalseAutonomously self-healing and self-strengthening polymer-metal compositeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25764Summary:
Autonomously self-healing and self-strengthening polymer-metal composites developed at Iowa State University have the potential to impact many material markets.

Description:
Despite self-healing technology being available since 2001, there are limited commercial examples of self-healing materials. ISURF 04588 demonstrates the the application of undercooled particles in producing mechanically responsive and reconfigurable composites. The composite exploits the metastable nature of the particles, whereby the undercooled liquid metal trapped within the particles undergoes solidification when the oxide shell is broken or significantly deformed. Thus, the composite is capable of self-healing due to passivation of cracks by the metastable liquid and simultaneously self-strengthening, since the solidified metal will typically be stronger than its matrix.

This is an untapped market with potential in any applications where a more durable or longer lasting material may be desirable.

Advantage:
• No catalyst required
• Material is stronger than the “unrepaired” analogue
• Repaired area can be easily detected
• Applicable to a number of matrices

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/257644588Tue, 14 Nov 2017 07:19:16 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

This is an untapped market with potential in any applications where a more durable or longer lasting material may be desirable.

]]>Advantage:Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseParticle jamming for controllable adhesionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26418Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a technology where an adhesive can be rapidly switched from a high to low state through a digital or mechanical trigger, enabling adhesion at surfaces to be controlled. The adhesive is strong, yet easily removable and reusable.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Iowa State University researchers take advantage of the rapid control of stiffness through the jamming or unjamming of granular media to improve adhesive properties. Solid particles, in combination with a flexible skin, provide adhesion to a surface of interest when the particles are jammed together through the application of a vacuum.  The adhesion from this technology does not require tackiness of the surface or the direct application of a vacuum to the surface, but instead controls the stiffness of the interface between the adhesive and the other surface. Particle size, shape, alignment patterns, and hardness can be varied, resulting in tunable and removable adhesion to a variety of items, including those with smooth curvature.

Advantage:
• Rapid, controllable adhesion for a variety of applications.
• The particle jamming does not interlock with the features of the item to be adhered to, so removal is easy.
• Suitable for larger objects with curvature

Application:
Industrial robotics, with particular relevance to materials handling.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 18 Oct 2017 12:01:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/264184674Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:15 GMTSummary:

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePropane Dehydrogenation over Carbide Catalysts with High Selectivityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26231Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a propane dehydrogenation method to transform shale gas efficiently to propylene, which allows a new route to the second most abundant polymer, polypropylene. This is the first example of using carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Shale gas contains large amounts of propane gas. As dehydrogenation of propane into propylene represents an enormous market opportunity, propane dehydrogenation catalysts have been highly valued and extensively researched. Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated that carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

Advantage:
• Significantly higher selectivity
• Low by-product formation
• Much reduced cost compared with current commercial catalysts

• Consistent conversion rate with the best commercial catalysts

Application:
Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Wed, 13 Sep 2017 13:12:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/262314665Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:04 GMTSummary:carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

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]]>Application:Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseMethod for Synthesizing Magnet Alloys via Thermal Spray Using Recycled Materialhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26120Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to recycle rare earth elements (REE) waste from magnet processing as well as REE from end-of-life magnets using a very simple and economical process.  The process involves creating new magnetic material through a thermal spray technique, resulting in magnets with slightly lower magnetic performance (compared to sintered or bonded magnets produced from virgin material) but with much greater flexibility in magnet geometry and thickness than conventionally produced magnets.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Rare earth magnets play an essential role in many alternative energy technologies, electric cars, and in consumer electronic devices, but manufacturing of the magnets results in a substantial amount of waste REE material that is often not economical to recycle.  Similarly, recycling of REE from end of life products, in particular magnets from hard disk drives, is rarely pursued because of the economics of the processes.

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

Advantage:
• Low cost recycling method
• Gap magnet production with potential for unique and thin geometries
• Simple and economical processing

Application:
Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet material

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]]>Fri, 01 Sep 2017 10:42:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/261204605Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:01 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet materialDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseSynthesis of pure or doped porous oxide materials through self-assembly of coordination polymerizationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25765Summary:
A simple, effective and controllable synthetic method for porous materials for markets of photo-catalysis, carbon capture, gas storage & separation and beyond

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Development Stage:

Description:
Porous materials are of technological significance in a broad range of market applications in catalysis, CO2 capture, gas storage, separations, or in situ reaction control. For instance, the carbon capture market was an estimated USD 4.25 billion in 2016 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 13.6% to USD 8.05 billion in 2021.

However, making the porous structure is often complicated and lacks precise control. Current technologies for porous materials uses oxy-hydroxides as starting materials and fabricate porous structures. The pore size and the distribution of these materials are designed using additives and optimization of kinetics of sintering process.

ISURF #04608 demonstrated a novel technique to generate porous metal oxides by using polymer chemistry and with easy design and control for pore structure and end product properties. This technology is more robust and simple than currently available technologies. This technique has already been demonstrated as useful for the conversion of CO2 into methane.

Advantage:
• Synthesis is more robust and simple than existing technology
• Easy design and control of pore structure
• Enables mixed composition materials to be easily created
• Photocatalysis of these porous material structures has been demonstrated to be superior to other metal oxides, such as TiO2 or VOx

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/257654608Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:39 GMTSummary:

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However, making the porous structure is often complicated and lacks precise control. Current technologies for porous materials uses oxy-hydroxides as starting materials and fabricate porous structures. The pore size and the distribution of these materials are designed using additives and optimization of kinetics of sintering process.

ISURF #04608 demonstrated a novel technique to generate porous metal oxides by using polymer chemistry and with easy design and control for pore structure and end product properties. This technology is more robust and simple than currently available technologies. This technique has already been demonstrated as useful for the conversion of CO2 into methane.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseHighly porous thermoelectric nanocomposite with low thermal conductivityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25632Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for making a thermoelectric nanocomposites using limited materials.

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Development Stage:

Description:
ISU researches have developed a method of making porous bismuth telluride selenide (Bi2(Te,Se)3), a superior replacement in thermoelectric devices to bismuth telluride(Bi2Te3). Compared to Bi2Te3, the ternary Bi2(Te, Se)3 systems have superior thermal conductivity and a higher thermoelectric figure of merit. This method is easily scalable and uses less material than other Bi2(Te, Se)3 ternary systems. The resulting porous material maintains the same performance as the 100% dense material.

Advantage:
• Uses limited materials
• Higher performance than bismuth telluride
• Maintains same performance as dense bismuth telluride selenide analogues

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]]>Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:15:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/256324637Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:28 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>]]>]]>Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseRapid Enrichment of Viable Bacteria using Magnetic Ionic Liquids for PCR Amplification and Culture-Based Diagnosticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25426Summary:
ISU researchers have developed new molecules with an accompanying method to preconcentrate bacteria for rapid detection for food safety testing.

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Development Stage:

Description:
The detection of viable bacteria in food, environmental, or clinical samples is limited by time-consuming enrichment procedures (e.g., overnight cultures) that are often mandatory for the analysis of extremely small quantities of microorganisms. Iowa State University researchers have developed new molecules to act as magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) and an method of use thereof to isolate, extract, and concentrate bacteria in an efficient manner for rapid testing purposes. These tunable MILs present unique physiochemical properties, resulting in materials that are responsive to external magnetic fields. Using this magnetism allows for easy separation of the MILs and extracted material from non-magnetic media. ISU inventors have demonstrated the ability of their specially designed MILs to be able to extract bacteria with high specificity. After a simple separation and culturing in broth, quantifiable colonization of recovered bacteria begins within two hours. This enrichment approach can be coupled with PCR amplification to further increase sample throughput. Regardless of downstream detection methods, MIL-based preconcentration of bacteria constitutes an enrichment strategy that allows for significantly faster detection of relevant bacteria for the food safety testing industry.

Advantage:
• Fast preconcentration of bacteria
• Allows for higher throughput of detection

Application:
Food safety testing, research tool

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/254264591Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:14 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:Food safety testing, research toolPatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalsePreparation of mixed metal chalcogenides by mechanochemical processsing and exfoliationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25371Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for easily creating interlayer solid solutions of mixed metal chalcogenides.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Mixed metal chalcogenides have numerous application as oil lubricant additives, photocatalysts, battery materials, super-capacitor electrodes, thermoelectric materials, hydrogen storage materials and in a number of photoelectronic materials.  The currently available routes for obtaining these compounds in an interlayer solid solution are either expensive or difficult to scale. Iowa State University researchers, in conjunction with Ames Laboratory, have developed a method for creating these valuable materials through mechanical means. This high-throughput method is expected to reduce cost and complexity of production and is able to support easy adoption into industrial production.

Advantage:
• Cheap and simple manufacturing
• Easily scalable

Application:
Batteries, energy storage, photovoltaics

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253714629Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:06 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:]]>Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduMaterialsFalseImproved Spinach Aptamer Ligandshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25064Summary:
Improved spinach (and broccoli) aptamer ligands for in vitro applications delivering increased signal intensity when associated with the target aptamer.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Light-up aptamers,which create a fluorescent signal on binding to their ligands, are promising sensors for in vitro homogeneous assays and for in vivo applications. When linked to other aptamers of defined specificity that drive their ability to bind ligand, these light-up aptamers can report on the presence of analytes in vitro that range from metabolites to proteins.
The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

Advantage:
• Increased signal strength
• Suitability for in vitro application
• Facile chemical synthesis protocols

References:
Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:07:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/250644502Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

]]>Advantage:

]]>References:Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModular Unit for Thermal Conductivity Measurements in Multiple Cryogenic/Magnetic Field Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24096Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a modular sample stage and thermal conductivity measurement device that is compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field apparatus.  This modular device allows for easy switching between apparatus to perform a variety of measurements without sample or thermometer remounting.

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Development Stage:

Description:
The thermal conductivity of a material is of great importance for determining suitability for a given application.  While many techniques have been developed to measure thermal conductivity at moderate temperatures, measurement at low (sub-kelvin) temperatures are difficult to achieve.  These low temperature measurements are important to characterize novel materials, particularly in determining the superconducting state while isolating electronic degrees of freedom.

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

Advantage:
• Modular sample stage and measurement device compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field devices.
• Minimizes sample handling and mounting and eliminates experimental error from different thermometers and calibration.

Application:
Low temperature (< 1K) thermal conductivity characterization of novel materials.

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]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:11:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240964582Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseFunctionalization of Ceria with Phosphate for Catalytic Applicationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23788Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a catalyst functionalized with phosphate that allows for several catalytic processes to occur simultaneously.

Stage1.png

Description:
Ceria (CeO2) catalysts have been a useful solid phase catalyst that has seen an increase in industrial use recently due to its convenient and tunable redox activity. The Ce+3/Ce+4 catalytic cycle readily available on the surface of the substrate allows for facile oxygenation of several important organic substrates. Further alterations of ceria allows for more complex catalytic systems and specific tailorability. ISURF researchers achieve this tailorability by incorporating surface phosphates onto Ceria. Incorporation of the phosphate substrates increases the Brønsted acidity and upon deposition of Pd, the material showed activity for eugenol hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, propylene oxide hydrolysis, and indigo carmine photo degradation.

Advantage:
• Allows for a multi-functional catalysis
• Tailorable for higher selectivity
• Demonstrably higher yields of hydrogenation reactions

Application:
Hydrogenation catalysis

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]]>Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:28:41 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237884539Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage1.pngDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Hydrogenation catalysisDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseMetabolically Engineered Membrane Proteins for Improved Membrane Integrity and Production of Fatty Acids in Escherichia colihttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23726Summary:
ISU researchers developed a method of increasing the yield of high value fatty acids produced by E. coli

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Description:
Increasing productivity in the fermentative production of chemicals often hits a ceiling in product titer, either as a result of suppression in expression of enzymes necessary for the production pathway or in cell mortality due to high concentrations of the product itself. While removal of the product from the fermentation broth can address this “feedback” effect, an alternative and potentially less expensive solution to the problem is to modify the organism to be able to tolerate higher product concentrations. ISU researchers have used a combination of gene deletion and up-regulation to increase fatty acid titter by 53% compared to the non-engineered controls without negatively impacting cell viability.

Advantage:
• Greatly increased titter
• Inexpensive
• Uses existing fermentation systems

Application:
Fatty acid production from alternative sources

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]]>Wed, 21 Dec 2016 14:00:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237264529Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:21 GMTSummary:E. coli

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Fatty acid production from alternative sourcesDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseOxy-Sulfide-Nitride Mixed Network Former High Ion Conductivity Solid Electrolyteshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23708Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a compound to replace the liquid electrolyte that is used in lithium ion batteries with a safer solid matrix for use in a sodium ion battery alternative.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Description:
Lithium ion batteries have become ubiquitous in our society, powering almost all cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid cars. The high power density and low weight has made these batteries attractive despite questionable stability. When these batteries fail, the results can be spectacular, including highly publicized catastrophic failures that result in fire. A safer more stable battery, that is capable of similar performance to current lithium ion battery technology, is therefore desirable. One solution for increasing stability is to replace the liquid electrolyte with a solid medium. Two commonly studied solid electrolyte types are all-oxide or all-sulfide. Typically, all-oxide solid electrolytes are poor conductors, however they can be very stable. In contrast, all-sulfide electrolytes are highly conductive but chemically unstable and therefore expensive to manufacture. ISU researchers have developed a family of compounds to be used as a solid electrolyte for sodium batteries that utilizes a mixture of oxides and sulfides, doped with nitrogen, that combines the advantages of the all-oxide and all-sulfide alternatives. The resulting compounds provide a safe and high performing solid matrix.

Advantage:
• High conductivity
• Stable
• Low cost of production

Application:
Batteries, energy storage

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:24:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237084451Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:20 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Batteries, energy storagePatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAcid-Free Dissolution and Separation of Rare-earth Metalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23707Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to effectively recycle rare earth elements through simple REDOX reactions allowing for aqueous processing. This replaces the need for dangerous and environmentally unfriendly acids.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Description:
Rare earth elements (REE) have seen a sharp increase in use in a number of technical materials such as high density and high temperature tolerant permanent magnets, lamp phosphors, catalysts, rechargeable batteries and many other technologies related to a transition to a greener economy. With China controlling more than 90% of REE output and increasingly stringent export quotas, the world at large faces a risk of supply disruption. Recycling of spent materials is therefore crucially important. ISU researchers have developed a novel approach to recycling REEs (particularly neodymium and dysprosium) by dissolving REE containing metal scrap in a reducing aqueous solution. After simple processing of the solubilized material, pure REE-oxides can be recovered. Recovery yield of the REE-oxides are typically greater than 95%. The use of aqueous reduction to dissolve the REE replaces the need for environmentally unfriendly acid use.

Advantage:
• Cost effective and time efficient
• Environmentally friendly
• Expected to scale efficiently
• Applicable to small or large scale operation

Application:
Recycling rare earth elements

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:05:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237074443Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Recycling rare earth elementsPatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSilica Encapsulation of Ureolytic Bacteria for Self-healing of Cement-Based Compositeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23692Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method to encapsulate bacteria for incorporation into concrete as the basis for self-healing of cracks.

Description:
Microbially-Induced Carbonate Precipitation has been well studied as a mechanism for the surface repair of concrete structures and soil stabilization.  Use of MICP in concrete mixture as a built-in repair system, however, has been slow to develop because of the difficulty of preparing microorganisms for long-term survival in cured concrete.
ISU researchers have developed a method to encapsulate ureolytic bacteria in a silica shell before freeze-drying, providing a protective shell that is compatible with the calcium silicates of Portland cement.  Survival of the freeze dried bacteria in cured concrete and utility of the encapsulated bacteria to induce carbonate precipitation in fractured cement paste has been demonstrated.

Advantage:
• Demonstrated healing of stressed concrete samples
• Cost-effective encapsulation of bacteria
• Bio-friendly

Application:
Self-healing of concrete

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 13 Dec 2016 12:09:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/236924465Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed a method to encapsulate ureolytic bacteria in a silica shell before freeze-drying, providing a protective shell that is compatible with the calcium silicates of Portland cement.  Survival of the freeze dried bacteria in cured concrete and utility of the encapsulated bacteria to induce carbonate precipitation in fractured cement paste has been demonstrated.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMaking paraffin-like coating materials from soybean oilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23520Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a paraffin wax substitute.

Description:
Corrugated cardboard coated in wax is a typical container for shipping many products.  The wax coating offers water repellence and some chemical resistance that cardboard boxes alone don’t offer. The wax for these boxes are typically petroleum derived and not able to be repulped and recycled and are slow to degrade, causing a significant source of waste. With the price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, a biorenewable cost-effective, high performing wax is desirable. To meet this market need, ISU researchers have developed a new material derived from soybean oil with properties similar to paraffin wax.

Advantage:
• Obtained from natural and renewable sources
• Comparable melting point, hydrophobicity, and hardness to paraffin wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:11:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235204555Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patents:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseCopper-Alkali Metal Secondary Batteryhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22980Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new battery chemistry suitable for secondary energy storage, including storage of electricity produced by renewable energy sources such as solar and wind generation.  These batteries offer comparable energy density to lithium-based batteries, but feature a liquid metal anode, avoiding the dendrite formation and related safety issues of lithium batteries.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have recently developed a new battery chemistry which combines a copper metal cathode with an alkali metal solution at the anode.  The metal solution can be kept in the liquid state at lower temperatures than other molten salt batteries (such as sodium-sulfur and sodium-nickel batteries), improving system efficiency and lowering the cost of containment materials.  The batteries utilize a solid alkali ion conducting separator and aqueous catholytes of the alkali metal salts.

Advantage:
• Abundant and cheap anode materials
• Lower temperature operation and less corrosive than other sodium-based batteries
• Safe operation

Application:
Secondary energy storage

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:04:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/229804436Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:08 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePropane Dehydrogenation Catalyst with Greatly Enhanced Lifespanhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22835Summary:
Iowa State University and researchers have developed a process to platinum-tin catalysts for propane dehydrogenation to enhance catalyst lifetime before regeneration up to six-fold.

Description:
Propane dehydrogenation is a common method to produce propylene, one of the most important chemical building blocks. Platinum-tin catalysts have been shown to have high selectivity towards propylene with good yield, but suffer from quick deactivation from coking. Iowa State researchers have discovered a treatment method that provides a six-fold increase in catalyst life before coking and deactivation without sacrificing selectivity and yield.

Advantage:
• A six-fold increase in catalyst life before deactivation
• No decrease in yield or selectivity relative to conventionally-treated catalysts
• Cost effective process performed at moderate temperatures and pressures

Application:
Propane dehydrogenation to propylene

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 13 Sep 2016 11:39:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/228354408Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:04 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA Novel Vegetable Oil-Based Material as Substitute for Carnauba Waxhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22573Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a new material with a high hardness comparable to that of palm-based carnauba wax and a much higher melting point.

Description:
In North America, the consumption of wax is around three billion pounds per year with an associated vale in excess of three billion dollars. Markets of waxes are diverse, ranging from simple fuel in candles to practical applications such as coating in the paper and packaging industry. The largest market of wax remains in the packaging area, which are mostly derived from petroleum-based paraffin waxes. However, because of the increasing price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, there is considerable interest for cost-effective, higher performing and naturally sourced alternatives like carnauba wax. To address this issue, ISU researchers developed a new material derived from soybean oil that has superior properties to petroleum paraffin wax with a high hardness, high melting point and good surface finish.

Advantage:
• Natural and renewable
• High hardness
• Higher melting point than carnauba wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 28 Jul 2016 12:19:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/225734482Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDevelopment of Enhanced AlNiCo Magnetshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22092Summary:
ISU and Ames Lab researchers have developed a method for producing AlNiCo magnets that employs the substitution of less expensive materials for cobalt in the AlNiCo alloy.

Description:
AlNiCo magnets account for a little more than four thousand metric tons of material with a market value of $280mn. AlNiCo magnets are often used as a replacement magnet for ferrite magnets when high temperature performance is required. Raw materials are estimated to account for approximately 33% of the cost of AlNiCo magnets, with the most expensive element being cobalt. The technology involves the substitution of less expensive materials for cobalt therefore significantly reducing production costs. Previous attempts at this substitution have almost exclusively used a 1:1 substitution of iron for cobalt. The results have been a decrease in the performance of the magnet with the increased substitution. The inventors have used a different approach to substitution, substituting several low cost elements for cobalt. The resulting magnet not only matches the performance of a traditional AlNiCo magnet, but production time is significantly reduced and can occur a much lower temperatures further reducing production costs.

Advantage:
• Reduced material costs
• Produced at lower temperatures
• Shorter production time
• Reduced overall production cost

Application:
Magnet production and scientific research 

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 26 May 2016 11:16:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/220924355Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsFalseA Method to Create Ultra-flat Metal Surfaceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21858Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method to produce ultra-flat metal surfaces without the compromises inherent to chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP).

Description:
Ultra-flat surfaces are important commercially for the semiconductor fabrication industry, and also are of interest for scientific studies of self-assembled monolayers, bilayers, electrodes and single-molecules. There are several methods to create ultra-flat surfaces including CMP which is the most common method currently used but is often a method of compromises, attempting to balance material removal rate against the susceptibility to produce scratches and other faults into the material. ISU researchers have developed new method of creating ultra-flat surfaces through a “mechanical annealing” process. The technique involves the bombardment of a surface with atoms (principally from transition metals) that fill in surface faults and results in an atomically flat surface.

Advantage:
• Significant cost reduction compared to CMP
• Consistent, reproducible flat surface
• Very large semiconductor market
• Minimal cleanup after surface fabrication

Application:
Semiconductor fabrication and scientific research

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 05 May 2016 13:14:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218584336Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:12 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUse of linseed oil-derived materials as rejuvenators of vacuum tower bottom and reclaimed asphalt pavementhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21827Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed formulations to use bio-derived materials as flux and/or rejuvenators for using vacuum tower bottoms (VTB) and reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in warm mix asphalt.

Description:
Heated bodied linseed oil and partially hydrogenated heated bodied linseed oil were used as flux and/or rejuvenators for asphalt binders made from vacuum tower bottoms (VTB). These bio-derived materials were able to improve the binder performance grade from 76-10 to PG 70-22 and PG 64-22 grades. As VTB is at a distinct price advantage over other binder materials, use of this material as a flux results in a significant decrease in costs.

Advantage:
• Large improvement in usability of VTB as an asphalt binder
• Applicable to warm mix asphalt that includes RAP at a lower price than other rejuvenators
• Bio-derived materials

Application:
Warm mix asphalt paving

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218274419Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePt-Modified (Gamma)-Ni+(Gamma Prime)-Ni3Al-Based Compositions for High-Temperature, Degradation-Resistant Structural Alloyshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21700

Summary:
ISU researchers have developed novel compositions that are specifically intended for high-strength, high-temperature resistant structural metallic alloys in novel architectures including honeycomb, truss-core or barrier foils. The compositions are particularly relevant to high-temperature coatings for aerospace applications such as space reentry vehicles and hypersonic missiles.

Description:
High value-added aerospace systems such as space re-entry and hypersonic missiles routinely require localized heat protection during service.  Materials that provide refractory protection must be oxidation resistant themselves. Degradation by oxidation is the key limitation of advanced materials such as carbon-carbon composites or refractory metal silicides. Most commercial alloys do not exhibit adequate oxidation resistance, largely due to the structure and kinetics of the oxides they form.

To further enhance properties of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloys such as strength and ductility, this technology is based on the finding that addition of up to 20% strengthening elements can be added without substantially altering the γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni phase stability. Suitable strengthening elements include, Cr, Si, Co, Mo, Re, Ta, W. The resulting strengthened alloy compositions form highly adherent, slow-growing TGO scales during both isothermal and cyclic oxidation at high temperatures (1150-1200° C). The technology is also based on the finding that controlling the Al content of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloy compositions to below about 16% renders them heat treatable.

Advantage:
• Enhanced strength and ductility
• Oxidation resistant

Application:
Aerospace Coatings

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:42:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217003201Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

To further enhance properties of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloys such as strength and ductility, this technology is based on the finding that addition of up to 20% strengthening elements can be added without substantially altering the γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni phase stability. Suitable strengthening elements include, Cr, Si, Co, Mo, Re, Ta, W. The resulting strengthened alloy compositions form highly adherent, slow-growing TGO scales during both isothermal and cyclic oxidation at high temperatures (1150-1200° C). The technology is also based on the finding that controlling the Al content of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloy compositions to below about 16% renders them heat treatable.

]]>Advantage:Application:Aerospace CoatingsStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Pt-Metal Modified (Gamma)-Ni+(Gamma Prime)-Ni3Al-Alloy Compositions for High-Temperature Degradation Resistant Structural AlloysUtilityUnited States8,821,65412/173,6837/15/20089/2/20144/1/20304/7/201611/13/2017FalseMesoporous Carbon Nanospheres for the Continuous Production/Extraction of High Value Fatty Acids from Algaehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21348Description:
The technology involves the use of specialized mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCN) for the selective extraction of high value fatty acids produced by algae in culture. The process allows for the removal of the oil form the algae and the selective sequestration of the oils in the MCN and does not cause terminally detrimental effects to the algal cells therefore allowing the process to be continuous. Current methods for extraction involve drying, grinding and resuspension of the biomass which results in the destruction of the algal cells. The new technology allows for the selective sequestration of the algal oils in a manner that is non-toxic and far less expensive. Once sequestered, the fatty acids and oils can be removed from the MCN’s by simple washing and easily converted to high value products.

Advantage:
• Drastic cost reduction
• Non-toxic
• Fast and continuous
• Convertible to biofuels

Application:
Production of high value fatty acids and conversion to biofuels

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Wed, 03 Feb 2016 10:53:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/213483617Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:51 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJackHartwigsenjackh1@iastate.eduAgriculture| MaterialsFalseMethods of room temperature cold-plastic forming or patterning of amorphous alloyshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21130Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to form amorphous metal alloys at room temperature without introducing shear bands or micro-crystalline structure into the alloy.

Description:
Amorphous alloys are desirable for use in high precision parts because the mechanical properties of these alloys, combined with the lack of grain boundaries, make them particularly suitable for fine-scale imprinting and patterning.  Thermo-plastic forming has often been utilized to form glassy metals, though this technique is inappropriate at room temperature because of the development of narrow shear bands in the metal.  These shear bands induce brittleness into the metal, often resulting in catastrophic failure of the part.  Various techniques may be used to achieve sufficient deformability of the alloy, including adding crystalline particles to create a second phase, controlling the deformation geometry, and raising the processing temperature of the alloy.  All of these techniques result in shortcomings in the resultant product.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

Advantage:
• Room temperature processing avoids embrittlement formed by sub-Tg annealing
• Process does not induce generation of shear bands in the alloy
• Provides control over deformation behavior of bulk amorphous alloys

Application:
Forming and patterning of bulk amorphous metal alloys

References:
Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 17 Dec 2015 10:26:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/211304181Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseManufacturing Method of Photonic Crystalhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21057Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method of manufacturing 3D photonic band gap crystals with superior properties.  Such a crystal manipulates light within a particular range of wavelengths which could be applied to a number of optical devices including but not limited to waveguides, solar cells, thermophotovoltaics, and telecommunication applications.

Description:
Polymeric molds of the layer-by-layer photonic crystal can be economically synthesized with a microtransfer molding technique. The refractive indices of these molds are imorived when conformally coated with higher-index materials to allow formation of a photonic bandgap.  The conformal coating of the molds has been demonstrated with a titania-coated polyurethane molds.  These conformational coatings improve the optical contrast in low-refractive-index photonic crystals such as submirometer-scale structures generated by micro transfer molds.

Advantage:
• Improves performance of photonic crystals
• Allows for use of thinner molds and higher index coatings

Application:
Photonics, microtransfer molding, polymeric materials

References:
Photonic bandgaps of conformally coated structures J. Opt. Soc. Am. B/Vol. 22, No. 12/December 2005

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:07:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210573738Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:36 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Photonic bandgaps of conformally coated structures J. Opt. Soc. Am. B/Vol. 22, No. 12/December 2005]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21045Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed tackifiers from biorenewable sources that exhibit a maximum tack at approximately 80˚C.

Description:
Tackifiers are important components of adhesive formulas, providing the stickiness or tack to the adhesive.  ISURF #04118 describes the initial synthesis of tackifiers from isosorbide and cyclic anhydrides to produce compounds with maximum tack between -20˚C to 40˚C (depending on the choice of anhydride).  ISURF #04346 builds upon this work by creating short oligomers of these tackifiers, resulting in maximum tack performance at 80˚C.

Advantage:
• Cost competitive with hydrocarbon-based resins; cost-advantaged versus other natural resins
• Bio-based with abundant supply of starting materials

Application:
Tackifiers for hot melt adhesives

References:
References: 1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:58:23 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210454346Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861
]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRoom Temperature Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 MRI Contrast Agenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21035Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to create gadolinium silicide nanoparticles which retain ferromagnetic properties at room temperature.

Description:
This innovative method creates Gd5Si4 nanoparticles that retain the ferromagnetic properties of the bulk material at room temperature. These nanoparticles may be useful as a MRI contrast agent or for other applications that would benefit from materials that highly respond to a magnetic field, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, MRI thermometry, and hyperthermic cancer treatment.

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

Advantage:
• Increased magnetic properties compared to existing MRI contrast agents

Application:
MRI contrast agent; transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperthermic cancer treatment

References:
1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210354379Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Imaging| Life Sciences| MaterialsFalseTransient electronics with improved electrical conductivity by incorporating insoluble metalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21030Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed transient electronics with superior electrical performance compared to systems which use metal oxide conductors.  While the conductive material in these new electronic devices do not dissolve, they do adequately disperse to obscure the design and purpose of the device.

Description:
While transient electronics for use in medical applications require complete dissolution in benign fluids, many applications don’t require this level of degradability.  Many applications only require that the circuit not be usable or capable of being reverse engineered once it has exceeded its lifespan.  For these highly-sensitive applications, Iowa State University researchers have developed a solution that has superior electrical performance compared to soluble metal oxide conductors.  By utilizing this technology, insoluble metal conductors are dispersed in response to appropriate environmental conditions, thus obscuring the design and purpose of the circuit.

Advantage:
• Better electrical performance compared to soluble metal oxides
• Dispersion of metal in response to environmental conditions and solubilization of the circuit board support

Application:
Transient electronics for highly sensitive applications

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210304395Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:18 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Transient electronics for highly sensitive applicationsPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicroscale Tentacle Actuatorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21029Description:
ISU researchers have invented a soft material-based manipulator for delicate, fragile microscale objects. It is based on a thin-walled elastomeric microtube with an asymmetric wall thickness distribution and one end closed. Upon applying air pressure from the open end, the microtube becomes elongated non-uniformly, bending towards the thick-walled side. This type of bending, however, is often insufficient to induce a spiraling which mimics the coiling motion of biological tentacles, such as those of the octopus. To amplify the bending into multi-turn spiraling, we installed a small extra thickness (i.e., hump) to the exterior of the microtube. When the size and position of the hump were adequate, the microtube could accomplish multi-tum spiraling which is ideal for winding around small objects and scoop them up. This type of conformal spiraling motion is non-destructive since it does not involve squeezing and will be useful for safe handling of cell aggregates, eggs, or biological tissues that are highly fragile.

Advantage:
• Can handle soft, fragile micro-objects that is not offered today
• Capable of grabbing objects as small as ~ 185 µM with a grabbing force of ~ 0.78 mN
• Unique fabrication techniques of the thin, highly deformable microtubes

Application:
Biological microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS)

References:
Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210294387Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:17 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractanthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21024Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:57:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210244391Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rare earth elementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21023Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:50:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210234150Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSelective Chemical Separation of Rare-Earth Oxalateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20984Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a cost effective step that easily separates rare earth oxalates into a light rare earth stream and a heavy rare earth stream.

Description:
For many rare earth ores, the percentage of the valuable heavy rare earths (in particular, terbium, europium, dysprosium, yttrium and gadolinium) in the ore is very low, making separation and recovery of these elements from the other rare earths not cost-effective.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that can be added on to conventional ore processing that readily separates rare earth oxalates into two streams, one containing the light rare earths (La – Sm) and the other containing heavy rare earths (Gd – Y).  This one step process requires no special equipment and minimal capital investment.  The process is water-based, and uses a “green” extractant to remove the heavy REEs from the light REEs.

Advantage:
• Chemical separation of rare earth elements into high-value and low-value streams
• Simple and fast – one-step process does not require special process equipment
• Environmentally friendly – uses green extract in place of hazardous organophosphorous compounds
• Cost effective

Application:
Rare earth ore processing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209844327Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth ore processingPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProcedure for concentrating rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets for efficient recyclinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20983Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process combining simple and environmentally-friendly chemical reactions with mechanical steps to enrich rare earth elements from neodymium iron boride magnet scrap for improved recycling.

Description:
Neodymium iron boride magnets are used in a variety of applications which require high energy density, most notably in clean energy solutions (generators and traction motors).  A variety of methods are available for recycling spent magnets, including pyrometallurgy and liquid extraction using organophospates.  While effective, these methods can have high energy costs and utilize extremely hazardous chemicals, making NdFeB recycling less attractive.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

Advantage:
• Minimal capital investment required
• Environmentally friendly
• Effective for other rare-earth iron containing compounds

Application:
Rare earth magnet recycling

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209834293Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth magnet recyclingStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseCustom Microstructure Patterning for Metal Matrix Composites (MMC)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20857Description:
One of the challenges in making layered metal composites reinforced at interfaces has been controlling the dispersion and microstructure of the reinforcement particles.  The reinforcement elements are typically applied at the interface by manual spreading using brush or by immersing the substrate in a suspension.  The technology described herein provides a method of fabricating a metal matrix composite wherein the method involves ultrasonic spraying reinforcement particles through a patterned mask to deposit on individual metallic sheets a pattern of discrete islands of reinforcement particles. 
The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

Advantage:
• A wide range of MMC’s such as copper, aluminum, magnesium nickel and their alloys can benefit from this process.  Sheets or foils of such metallic matrix can be used.
• A wide variety of nano-scale reinforcement particulate materials such as silicon carbide, aluminum oxide and titanium carbide may be deposited using this method
• Simple and low-cost process using an ultrasonic spraying which can be practiced using commercially available equipment
• Accurate control of the deposition rate resulting in a smoother and more uniform deposition utilizing a very low spraying velocity
• Flexibility in producing thin multilayered deposited structures

Application:
Metal laminate composites

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 11 Nov 2015 14:35:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/208574311Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:06 GMTDescription:The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSolution Phase Synthesis of Highly Processible Nanocrystalline LiZnP and Similar Ternary Semiconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20756Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel synthesis method to produce Nowotny-Juza semiconductors LiZnP and LiCdP.

Description:
Nowotny-Juza phase materials are intermetallic crystal materials with potential for a variety of applications, and are of particular interest because their electronic structure makes them amenable to applications in solar cells (light to energy conversion), thermoelectrics (heat to energy conversion), optoelectronics (LEDs, laser diodes) and anode materials.  This technology is a novel method of preparing LiZnP and LiCdP materials using solution phase chemistry that results in rapid synthesis of the desired materials at moderate temperatures.  The resultant materials are phase pure, crystalline and have a size on the order of 20nm. In addition to the potential applications listed above, LiZnP is expected to be able to replace cadmium sulfide as the buffer material for Copper Indium Galium Selenide (CIGS) solar cells, reducing the environmental footprint of these thin-film photovoltaics.

Advantage:
• Novel solution phase chemistry
• Rapid reaction with high conversion rate at moderate temperatures
• Tunable particle sizes

Application:
LED Lighting, CIGS Solar Cells, Quantum Dots

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:54 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207564401Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:04 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLubricated Mechanical Nanopolishing and Motor Oil for Self-Healing Metals and Ceramicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20754Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to produce extremely flat and smooth surfaces on hard materials without involving a chemical etchant.

Description:
Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a process used to create defect-free, smooth and flat surfaces, primarily for the semiconductor industry, and involves both mechanical polishing and chemical etching. CMP slurries (which provide the physical interface between the sample and the polishing equipment) typically consist of an abrasive (most often a metal oxide such as silica, ceria, alumina or zirconia), a liquid medium (normally water, but can be others depending on the application), and chemical agents (oxidizers, bases, acids) which treat the surface.
By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

Advantage:
• A 2 to 3 fold increase in surface smoothness
• Applicable to many hard surfaces
• May be extended to internal combustion engine lubricants
• May increase energy efficiency in treated engines

Application:
Semiconductor manufacture and internal combustion engine lubricants

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207544333Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:02 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acidhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20752Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:41 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207524402Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForGroup:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediaminehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20750Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207504357Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:]]>Group:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20749Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207494289Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRapid Room-temperature Polymerization of Bio-based Multiaziridine-containing Compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19739Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a catalyst-free, room-temperature synthesis route to create a thermosetting polymer from biorenewable materials.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the production of thermoset from biorenewable sources.  Beginning with acrylated, epoxidized soybean oil, the process involves reaction with aziridine followed by cross-linking using succinic, citric and other biobased diacids.  While the resultant properties were dependent upon the diacid used and the degree of acrylation of the soybean oil, all of the polymers had an amorphous structure.

Advantage:
• Thermosetting polymer made from predominantly biorenewable materials.
• Room temperature reaction with high conversion rate minimizes operating expenses.

Application:
Thermoset polymer with high renewable content

References:
1: “Rapid room-temperature polymerization of bio-based multiaziridine-containing compounds”, R. Chen et al., 2015, RSC Advances. 5:1557-1563.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 07:46:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197394279Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Rapid room-temperature polymerization of bio-based multiaziridine-containing compounds”, R. Chen et al., 2015, RSC Advances. 5:1557-1563.

]]>Patent:

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal hydrides at room temperaturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19738Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have demonstrated a mechanochemical process to produce alkali metal hydrides at room temperature and moderate hydrogen gas pressure with quantitative yields

Description:
Metal hydride synthesis typically involves either heating metals under a stream of hydrogen or employing transition metal catalysts and liquid hydrocarbons, thus requiring an additional purification step.  This new method of production allows for the use of simple mechanochemical processes at ambient temperature and slightly elevated hydrogen pressures.  Quantitative yields, short reaction times (depending on milling intensity and hydrogen pressure) and freedom from catalysts and solvent, this process should provide significant cost advantages versus traditional processing.  In addition, this process is safer than traditional processes as there is no risk of hydrogen accumulation and explosion.

Advantage:
• Rapid and inexpensive large-scale production of alkali-metal hydrides
• Scalable process easily adapted for continuous processing
• Dry and catalyst-free process requires no further solvent removal or purification steps

Application:
Metal hydride synthesis

References:
Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 07:46:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197384316Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsMethod of Making Alkali Metal HydridesUtilityUnited States9,663,36414/757,13211/23/20155/30/201711/23/20356/21/201711/13/2017FalsepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19578Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an invention which provides novel gel forming methacrylic blocking copolymers that exhibit cationic pH-sensitive behavior as well as good water solubility. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic( polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) polymer. The polymers may be use for drug and gene delivery, protein separation, as structural supplements, and more.

Advantage:
• These copolymers are water-soluble, pH sensitive and capable of thermoreversible gelation near physiological temperatures.

Application:
* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplements

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195782954Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:36 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplementsStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Materials| Veterinary MedicinepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gels and the Production ThereofUtilityUnited States7,217,77610/366,8642/14/20035/15/20072/14/20235/22/201511/13/2017FalseCost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19450Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory have developed a cost effective method for producing giant magnetocaloric material Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

Description:
Magnetic refrigeration has promise as an alternative to compressor technology for applications that range from liquefaction of helium to room temperature air conditioning. However, for most magnetic refrigeration applications large amounts (several hundred grams to hundreds of kilograms) of the magnetocaloric materials are needed to obtain sufficient cooling.  Unfortunately, processes for making giant magnetocaloric materials materials has been difficult to scale efficiently and still produce homogenous ingots.  To overcome this limitation, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for utilizing commercially available Gadolinium feedstock for cost effective production of material with improved magneto-caloric properties.  As a consequence, this method may enhance the commercial utility of of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and highly efficient.

Advantage:
• This new method allows for cost effective production of Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).
• The lower cost will dramatically improve the commercial viability of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and efficient.
• No commercial method is currently available to use commercial Gd metal to produce Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.

Application:
Applications exist anywhere there is need for freezing, heating, or cooling. Industries which produce cryogenics systems; supermagnets; and HVAC systems for homes, vehicular transports and other applications will be interested in this technology.

References:
V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the material have been produced.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194502487Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:28 GMTSummary:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).]]>Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.]]>Application:

]]>References:V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method of Making Active Magnetic Refrigerant Materials Based on Gd-Si-Ge AlloysCIPUnited States7,114,34010/413,4174/14/200310/3/200610/9/20215/15/201511/13/2017FalseShape Controlled Ferroelectric Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) Nanocrystalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19439Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for producing nanoscale ferroelectric modules for the fabrication of electronic devices.

Description:
Perovskite-type mixed metal oxide materials with general formula of ABO3, of which barium titanate (BaTiO3) is the most studied, have received tremendous research attention in the past decades due to their unique ferroelectric, catalytic, sensing, superconducting, and optical properties for use in thin-film capacitors, pyroelectric detectors, electrooptic modulators, transducers, actuators, optical memories, and nonlinear optics.  Similar to the trend seen with miniaturization conventional semiconductor devices, it is necessary to control the size and shape of BaTiO3 nanostructures used as building blocks for nanodevices.  While various approaches have been explored for the synthesis of BaTiO3 nanocrystals, such as injection-hydrolysis, thermal decomposition, and peptide assisted precipitation, none to date have enable shape control.  To overcome this limitation, ISU researchers have developed a one-pot non-hydrolytic approach for shape controlled synthesis of ferroelectric BaTiO3 nanocrystals.  By tuning the molar ratio between the surfactant and metal precursors, BaTiO3 nanocrystals with different shapes, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires, can be obtained.  These nanocrystals may have utility as nanoscale modules for the assembly of various electronic devices, such as sensors, detectors, capacitors, etc; in addition, BaTiO3 nanocrystals can also be used in multifunctional structural capacitors (where material elements simultaneously carry load and store energy) and related structural sensors.

Advantage:
• Simple (uses one-pot, non-hydrolytic synthesis approach)
• Effective (enables synthesis of well controlled shapes)
• Versatile (shape controlled nanocrystals have utility for assembly of a variety of electronic devices)

Application:
Electronic devices

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the shape controlled BaTiO3 nanocrystals are available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194393758Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ABO3, of which barium titanate (BaTiO3) is the most studied, have received tremendous research attention in the past decades due to their unique ferroelectric, catalytic, sensing, superconducting, and optical properties for use in thin-film capacitors, pyroelectric detectors, electrooptic modulators, transducers, actuators, optical memories, and nonlinear optics.  Similar to the trend seen with miniaturization conventional semiconductor devices, it is necessary to control the size and shape of BaTiO3 nanostructures used as building blocks for nanodevices.  While various approaches have been explored for the synthesis of BaTiO3 nanocrystals, such as injection-hydrolysis, thermal decomposition, and peptide assisted precipitation, none to date have enable shape control.  To overcome this limitation, ISU researchers have developed a one-pot non-hydrolytic approach for shape controlled synthesis of ferroelectric BaTiO3 nanocrystals.  By tuning the molar ratio between the surfactant and metal precursors, BaTiO3 nanocrystals with different shapes, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires, can be obtained.  These nanocrystals may have utility as nanoscale modules for the assembly of various electronic devices, such as sensors, detectors, capacitors, etc; in addition, BaTiO3 nanocrystals can also be used in multifunctional structural capacitors (where material elements simultaneously carry load and store energy) and related structural sensors.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:BaTiO3 nanocrystals are available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsMethod of Controlling Shape of Synthesized Ferroelectric Oxide Nanocrystal ParticlesUtilityUnited States9,051,18013/171,0216/28/20116/9/20154/5/20346/9/201511/13/2017FalseFacile Preparation of Nanoparticles for Biomedical and Chemical Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19438Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has developed a method for preparing nanoparticles that may enable microencapsulation of drugs for site-specific drug delivery.

Description:
Many potential drug candidates identified through high through-put screening have limited water solubility and thus are not advanced further in the drug development process.  Surfactant micelles can be used to solublize hydrophic agents in water; however, their utility for drug delivery is limited by the requirement for high critical micelle concentration (CMC), low thermodynamic stability, and because micelle assembly is highly variable.  Polymeric micelles have several advantages over surfactant micelles, including the tendency to aggregate at much lower concentrations, better thermodynamic stability and the ability to entrap or covalently attach a drug or other cargo with subsequent controlled release.  Unfortunately, physically trapped drugs can leak out the micelles prematurely but covalent attachment between the drug and delivery vessel places severe limits on their structures and also adds complexity to the formulation and production of the ultimate therapeutic package. To overcome these drawbacks, an ISU researcher has developed a method for simple preparation of nanoparticles for biomedical and chemical applications.  This method produces surface-crosslinked micelles (SCMs) that have numerous residual alkynes on the surface; multivalent modification can be accomplished easily by adding azide-functionalized polymers or ligands after crosslinking through “click” chemistry. The surface charge may be simply tuned by the cross-linked surfactants or through post-modification. The SCMs have been shown experimentally to be able to release entrapped cargo very rapidly and may have utility for drug delivery and other biomedical and chemical applications.

Advantage:
• Economical (production of the nanoparticles does not require iterative synthesis or rare metals)
• Simple (surface-functionalization is carried out in one-pot after crosslinking)
• Versatile (synthesis method is applicable to micelles, organic or inorganic nanoparticles, liposomes, globular or rod-like reversed micelles)
• Controllable (stimuli-triggered release can be engineered into the particles)

Application:
Drug delivery; controlled release; multivalent ligand design; solubilization

References:
1: "Facile Synthesis of Multivalent Water-Soluble Organic Nanoparticles via 'Surface-Clicking' of Alkynylated Surfactant Micelles," Shiyong Zhang and Yan Zhao, 2010, Macromolecules  43:4020-4022.

2: "Rapid Release of Entrapped Contents from Multi-Functionalizable, Surface Crosslinked Micelles upon Different Stimulation," Shiyong Zhang and Yan Zhao, 2010, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 10642-10644. DOI: 10.1021/ja103391k.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Entrapment and subsequent rapid release of mock hydrophobic drugs has been shown experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194383743Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:23 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: "Facile Synthesis of Multivalent Water-Soluble Organic Nanoparticles via 'Surface-Clicking' of Alkynylated Surfactant Micelles," Shiyong Zhang and Yan Zhao, 2010, Macromolecules  43:4020-4022.

2: "Rapid Release of Entrapped Contents from Multi-Functionalizable, Surface Crosslinked Micelles upon Different Stimulation," Shiyong Zhang and Yan Zhao, 2010, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 10642-10644. DOI: 10.1021/ja103391k.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsNanoparticles and Nanoparticle CompositionsUtilityUnited States8,790,62113/640,69810/11/20127/29/20144/30/20315/14/201511/13/2017Nanoparticles and Nanoparticle CompositionsContinuationUnited States9,320,71314/316,5856/26/20144/26/20165/2/20314/26/201611/13/2017FalseEnvironmentally Sensitive Foldable Oligomershttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19435Summary:
Conformation represents different shapes of a molecule as rotation occurs around single bonds. The conformation of a molecule directly affects its chemical and physical properties. The functions (i.e., binding, catalysis, or transport) of biomolecules such as proteins are frequently regulated by conformational transitions triggered by changes in environmental conditions. Development of synthetic molecules that mimic these types of changes is desirable for a variety of applications. ISU researchers have developed a novel class of responsive molecules that may be useful in “smart” materials applications, such as coatings or drug delivery.

Description:
Controlled conformational changes in proteins and other biomolecules in response to environmental stimuli are well recognized in many biological processes. However, similar conformational control has been difficult in synthetic molecules. Most previously designed responsive molecules have been polymers whose conformations are often ill defined. Thus, rational design of “smart” materials through conformational control has been a major challenge in polymer chemistry. In addition, traditional responsive polymers typically have high molecular weights, making them unsuitable in applications in nanometer-sized space. To overcome these difficulties, chemists have focused on developing “foldamers”: synthetic molecules with biomolecule-like, compact, ordered conformations. ISU researchers have recently developed a novel class of foldamers derived from bile acids. These foldamers can fold and unfold as their environmental conditions are varied. Conformational changes in these molecules have been shown to be triggered by temperature, pH, metal ions, small molecules, and solvent polarity. These foldamers have been demonstrated to be useful as highly tunable sensors. Other applications, such as drug delivery devices or “smart” materials (coatings or modulation of surface properties) are also possible

Advantage:
• Sensitive (oligomers can be designed to respond to very specific stimuli) 
• Predictable (enables precise control of conformational changes in response to environmental changes)
• Nanoscale (nanometer dimensions enable rapid response and uses in applications requiring sub-micrometer size)
• Versatile (response to a broad variety of environmental signals has been demonstrated)

Application:
Drug delivery, molecular sensors, other “smart” materials applications (e.g., coatings)

References:
1:“Oligomeric Cholates: Amphilphilic Foldamers with Nanometer-Sized Hydrophilic Cavities”, Yan Zhao and Zhenqi Zhong, 2005, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127:17894-17901.

2: “Tuning the Sensitivity of a Foldamer-Based Mercury Sensor by Its Folding Energy,” Yan Zhao and Zhenqi Zhong, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 9988–9989.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Samples of molecules that have been demonstrated to respond to chemical and physical signals, such as solvents, metal ions, pH and temperature, are available for testing.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194353384Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1:“Oligomeric Cholates: Amphilphilic Foldamers with Nanometer-Sized Hydrophilic Cavities”, Yan Zhao and Zhenqi Zhong, 2005, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127:17894-17901.

2: “Tuning the Sensitivity of a Foldamer-Based Mercury Sensor by Its Folding Energy,” Yan Zhao and Zhenqi Zhong, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 9988–9989.

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsEnvironmentally Sensitive Foldable OligomersUtilityUnited States7,960,43911/811,9056/12/20076/14/20119/3/20275/14/201511/13/2017FalseBiobased Production of Gold Nanoparticleshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19433Summary:
Iowa State University researchers, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Michigan, have identified a method for producing gold nanoparticles using a compound made by bacteria.  This method may have utility for the production of thin films or wires, or for delivery of gold as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

Description:
Methanobactin is a small peptide secreted by methane-oxidizing or methanotrophic bacteria and binds to extracellular copper when these bacteria are grown under low copper conditions.  Methanobactin is also able to bind to a number of other metals, including gold, iron, nickel, zinc, cobalt, cadmium, mercury, and uranium.  ISU researchers and their collaborators investigating the properties of methanobactin have determined that gold in the 3+ oxidation state, Au(III), can be reduced to its zero oxidation state, Au(0) at or below ratios of one Au(III) per methanobactin molecule.  Under these conditions, the Au(0) remains associated with the methanobactin, and could serve as a soluble delivery/extraction system for the generation of gold thin films or wires by application to surfaces.  Additionally, this methanobactin-Au(III) binding and reduction system may serve as an aurothiolate-type system for the administration of Au(0) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.  At ratios of Au(III) to methanobactin above one to one, methanobactin binds and catalytically reduces Au(III) to Au(0) with the concomitant production of gold nanoparticles, and this approach can also be used for the formation of gold nanoparticles. Continuous reduction of gold by methanobactin can also be achieved if a reductant is provided.  Thus, methanobactin has the potential to replace the use of toxic cyanide for the recovery of gold from ores.

Advantage:
• Versatile (ratio of Au(III) to methanobactin can be varied to produce gold thin films, wires or nanoparticles)
• Stable (at ratios of one or fewer Au(III) per methanobactin, gold remains bound in the Au(0) state, avoiding the toxic effects of gold oxidation of other aurothiolate-type treatments for rheumatoid arthritis)
• Simple (methanobactin can be purified using a one-step procedure and gold can be recovered by centrifugation)

Application:
Production of gold or copper nanoparticles, generation of gold thin films or wires; recovery of gold from ores; treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

References:
1: “Spectral and thermodynamic properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), U(VI), and Zn(II) binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b”, Choi, D. W. et al., 2006, J. Inorg. Biochem. 100:2150-2161.

2: “Spectral, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of Cu(I)- and Cu(II)-binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b”, Choi, D. W. et al., 2006, Biochemistry 45:1142–1153.

3: “Oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of methanobactin from type I and II methanotrophs”, Choi, D.W. et al., 2008, J. Inorg. Biochem. 102:1571–1580.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:26 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194333343Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References: “Spectral and thermodynamic properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), U(VI), and Zn(II) binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b”, Choi, D. W. et al., 2006, J. Inorg. Biochem. 100:2150-2161.

2: “Spectral, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of Cu(I)- and Cu(II)-binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b”, Choi, D. W. et al., 2006, Biochemistry 45:1142–1153.

3: “Oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of methanobactin from type I and II methanotrophs”, Choi, D.W. et al., 2008, J. Inorg. Biochem. 102:1571–1580.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsUse of MethanobactinUtilityUnited States7,932,05211/880,8867/24/20074/26/20118/31/20265/14/201511/13/2017Use of MethanobactinDivisionalUnited States8,735,53812/970,18012/16/20105/27/20148/17/20275/14/201511/13/2017FalseConvenient Synthesis of A-Type Procyanidinshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19431Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved method for synthesis of A-type procyanidins, compounds found in cinnamon, which may be useful in the treatment of diabetes and other diseases.

Description:
The rise of Type 2 diabetes is a serious public health concern and the role of diet and lifestyle in its development have been the subject of intense research.  Plant-based foods, including many common spices, are thought to be important for the control and possibly prevention of Type 2 diabetes.  In fact, common spices such as cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and bay leaves have been shown to have insulin-potentiating activity in vitro, with type A procyandidins being identified with having insulin promoting activity.  Unfortunately, type-A procyanidins are difficult to synthesize, making investigation into their possible role in the treatment and/or prevention of Type 2 diabetes more demanding.  To overcome this obstacle, ISU researchers have developed a convenient one-step synthesis method for type-A procyanidins that does not require the complex starting materials or suffer from low yields of other known synthesis methods.  Since this method can be scaled to produce gram quantities of material, it may represent a starting point for the development of type A procyanidin-based drug leads for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and possibly other diseases.

Advantage:
• Simple (synthesis requires only one step)
• Efficient (yields of 76-80% have been demonstrated)

Application:
Nutraceutical production

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The synthesis route has been described, materials are available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194313313Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Nutraceutical productionStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsUtilityUnited States7,615,64911/275,7561/26/200611/10/20098/8/20275/14/201511/13/2017Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsContinuationUnited States8,138,35812/563,9099/21/20093/20/20128/23/20235/14/201511/13/2017Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsDivisionalUnited States8,415,48913/292,81211/9/20114/9/20131/26/20265/14/201511/13/2017FalseHigh Strength Gold Wire for Microelectronics Miniaturizationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19428Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength gold wire for use in microelectronics that can maintain its electrical and mechanical properties while permitting miniaturization of microelectronics design.

Description:
Gold alloy wires currently used in microelectronics have limited electrical and mechanical properties due to elemental alloy addition limitations, and efforts to overcome these drawbacks have so far lead to wires that are too brittle or have insufficient conductivity to be practical. Reduction in microelectronic design is thus constrained. For example, wire currently available for use in microelectronics is limited to a wire bondable length of 100 times the wire diameter: lengths greater than this cause the wire to slump under its own weight as a result of low strength. The wire bondable length can therefore not be increased without increasing the diameter of the wire while decreasing wire thickness to reduce weight sacrifices maximum. Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a method for producing gold alloy wire for use in microelectronics that is stronger than currently available wire. This high strength wire can be produced with a diameter smaller than that of conventional wire, yet maintains its mechanical and electrical properties. This innovation will help facilitate microelectronics miniaturization and the development of smaller and lighter weight electronic devices with greater design flexibility.

Advantage:
• Enables significant reduction in diameter compared to commercially available gold alloy wires
• Facilitates the miniaturization of microelectronics.

Application:
Microelectronics

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Microelectronics interconnects at lengths of greater than 100 times the diameter of the wire have been demonstrated.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:22 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194282408Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:15 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsHigh Strength Gold Wire for Microelectronics Miniaturization and Method of Making the SameUtilityUnited States5,915,16009/025,0672/9/19986/22/19992/9/20185/14/201511/13/2017FalseConversion of Cyclic Amines into Lactams for Synthesis of Nylons and Other Polymershttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19426Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the conversion of cyclic amines into lactams, which may have utility for the production of nylons and other industrial polymers.

Description:
Lactams are used for a wide variety of commercial applications, such as precursors for the production of solvents, nylons, and other polymers.  Caprolactam is a particularly important lactam that is used as a precursor for Nylon-6, of which millions of tons are sold each year.  However, the traditional commercial process for production of caprolactam uses highly corrosive sulfuric acid and generates ammonium sulfate as a by-product. So-called “green” methods for production of caprolactam give relatively high yields, but require expensive high pressure equipment.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the conversion of cyclic amines (typically 5-, 6-, and 7-membered rings) into lactams that can be used for the synthesis of nylons and other commercially important polymers.  This process uses Au/SiO2 to catalyze the reaction of cyclic amines with oxygen at low pressures and uses starting materials that do not require lengthy syntheses.

Advantage:
• Enables synthesis of lactams used for a variety of commercial applications
• Process does not use highly corrosive sulfuric acid or generate ammonium sulfate by product
• Does not require high pressure equipment
• Uses different starting materials than traditional routes to lactams

Application:
Synthesis of nylons and other polymers

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Conversion of cyclic amines to a variety of lactams with yields of up to 50% have been demonstrated experimentally using this process, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194263800Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:2 to catalyze the reaction of cyclic amines with oxygen at low pressures and uses starting materials that do not require lengthy syntheses.

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Process for the Conversion of Cyclic Amines Into LactamsUtilityUnited States8,212,02713/095,5234/27/20117/3/20127/5/20165/14/201511/13/2017FalseAluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25372Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength, lightweight aluminum wire for high-voltage power transmission with reduced electrical resistance for overhead electrical lines.

Description:
High-voltage electric power transmission cables based on pure aluminum strands with a stranded steel core (ACSR) or stranded aluminum alloy (ACAR) core have the disadvantages of mediocre tensile strength, high density, and poor strength and conductivity retention at elevated temperatures. This combination of properties causes excessive sag in overload situations and limits the mechanical tension the cables can bear in icing and high wind situations. Alternative materials that increase cable strength generally have poor conductivity and/or high cost. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have discovered a method to produce an aluminum matrix wire composite with reduced density that adds strength while retaining maximum ampacity.

Advantage:
• Simple (manufacturing methods are similar to those used now)
• Effective (high electrical conductivity and strength at both ambient and high temperatures)
• Economical (use of low cost materials)

Application:
High-voltage wires and cables for electrical transmission

References:
1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
The Al/Ca composite has demonstrated promising corrosion resistance and elevated temperature performance properties while creep and fatigue strengths are being investigated.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 14:03:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253723794Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Aluminum/Alkaline Earth Metal Composites and Method for ProducingUtilityUnited States8,647,53613/136,5998/4/20112/11/201411/28/20315/24/201711/13/2017FalseMaterial to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganisms and Microalgaehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19422Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that provides an economical and efficient process to harvest microorganisms such as microalgae from growth media.

Description:
The interest in using algae as feedstock for biofuel production has steadily increased in recent years. In addition to biofuel applications, algae also provide valuable materials for the nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and food industries. However, methods to obtain concentrated volumes of algae from growth media are expensive, energy intensive and inefficient.  To overcome these drawbacks, researchers at Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory have developed a material for easy separation of microorganisms from the media; the material and growth medium may also be reused after the microorganisms have been recovered. The material provides benefits and advantages over other currently known methods concentrating microalgae and other microorganisms by avoiding the addition of soluble chemicals which have the potential to interfere with sequestration, the high energy demand of filtration methods, and inefficient recovery through the loss of flocculation compounds.

Advantage:
• High yields of microorganisms/microalgae
• Re-use of material for continuous microorganism harvest
• Simple and fast microorganism removal
• No impact on growth media

Application:
Sequestration of microorganisms from growth media for use in biofuel production, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and the food industry

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194223784Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Samples are available for testing.Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Magnetic Mesoporous Material for the Sequestration of AlgaeUtilityUnited States8,828,70513/300,34311/18/20119/9/20142/5/20325/14/201511/13/2017FalseLow Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide Superconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19421Description:
Superconductors are materials which carry electrical current without dissipation. However, feeding electrical current into a superconductor generates heat dissipation in the contacts and degrades maximum attainable current value. The degradation in contacts is also different depending on the different chemical nature of the superconducting materials. Iron-pnictide based superconductors have a number of superior properties as compared to other known high temperature superconductors, and due to their high critical magnetic fields, can be competitive alternatives for generating high magnetic fields without loss of resistance.  In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

Advantage:
• Effective (provides low contact surface resistivity of 10-9 W.cm2)
• Economical (utilizes current solder methods with an economical material

Application:
Electrical contact material for superconductors based on iron-pnictides

References:
Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194213707Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:09 GMTDescription:In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

]]>Advantage:10-9 W.cm2)]]>Application:

]]>References:Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide SuperconductorsUtilityUnited States8,450,24612/931,9992/15/20115/28/20132/15/20315/14/201511/13/2017FalseProcess for Fabrication of Efficient Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19420Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for fabrication of solar cells with increased efficiency.

Description:
Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight.  However, the efficiency of organic solar cells is about 4-6%, and increasing this efficiency is critical for developing practical applications and commercially viable devices.  One approach to increasing efficiency is to increase the light absorption on the organic film without increasing the thickness of the photoactive layer, and various light management techniques have been tried for enhancing optical absorption, such as collection mirrors, patterned substrates and microprism substrates.  However, these approaches require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for conformal coating of polymer photovoltaic layers on microtextured substrates for increased light trapping.  The light management architecture of these solar cells enables a high degree of light absorption in even very thin photoactive films and leads to improved power conversion efficiency.

Advantage:
• Efficient (improves light absorption and power conversion)
• Economical (can be fabricated using low-cost and scalable soft lithography techniques)

Application:
Photovoltaics

References:
1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A 20% increase in efficiency has been observed experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194203677Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Textured Micrometer Scale Templates as Light Managing Fabrication Platform for Organic Solar CellsUtilityUnited States9,401,44213/223,3519/1/20117/26/201610/17/20338/15/201611/13/2017FalseFabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Depositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19293Summary:
Photonic crystals are optical materials that can be used to control and manipulate the flow of light. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for the producing photonic crystals that can be used as highly efficient light sources.

Description:
Ordinary incandescent lamps waste most of the supplied electric power to emit invisible light such as infrared. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals can be used as high-efficiency light emitting sources by reducing the radiation of undesired wavelengths. However, fabrication of three dimensional metallic photonic crystals using conventional semiconductor processing methods requires costly equipment and processes that are a barrier to commercialization of these highly efficient light sources. To overcome these obstacles, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microtransfer molding method for the fabrication of emissible metallic photonic crystals.

Advantage:
• Very low production costs
• Ease of fabrication
• Amenable to mass production

Application:
Highly efficient visible/infrared light source; Thermo-voltaic applications

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3583: Linearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Devices

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the 3D metallic photonic crystals are available for testing.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 12:50:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192933282Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Group:ISURF #3583: Linearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Devices

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fabrication of Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Two Polymer Microtransfer MoldingUtilityUnited States7,625,51511/455,4866/19/200612/1/20094/1/20285/8/201511/13/2017FalseSpherically Focused Air-Coupled Foil Transducerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19315Summary:
A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer

Description:
The use of air-coupled ultrasonic transducers for materials inspection, characterization and ultrasonic imaging is becoming more widespread because it permits non-contact evaluation of materials such as wood, paper, composites, plastics, or any light-weight material, or inspection of large structures. Prior efforts to optimize transducer sensitivity and image resolution have largely involved the use of mirrors and backplates or wafers that result in incomplete focusing, low sensitivity or bandwidth limitations. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer that consists of a thin metallized polymer membrane, a flexible backplate, and a spherically curved backing fixture. The resulting device demonstrates higher signal amplitude, better bandwidth and better spatial resolution than other air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and should lead to improved ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation and imaging. Unlike currently used ultra-sound devices that cannot be focused without mirrors or interference plates, the air-coupled foil transducer enables spherical focusing that concentrates the sound energy, resulting in improved image resolution and enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements

Advantage:
• Inexpensive
• Improved image resolution
• Enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements
• Does not require intermediate optics

Application:
Air-coupled ultrasonic measurement; ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193153209Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:45 GMTSummary:A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducerDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Air-Coupled TransducerUtilityUnited States7,759,84211/913,9214/28/20087/20/20105/26/20265/8/201511/21/2017FalseMomentum-Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped Holeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19259Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new shape-hole design concept to enable more effective film-cooling for gas turbine engines and other applications.

Description:
Film cooling is a widely used method to protect materials exposed to hot gases whose temperatures may exceed the melting temperature of the materials, for example in gas turbine engines used in aerospace and power generation.  Film cooling protects the material by injecting a layer of cooler air to insulate the material surface from the hot gas; however, it can be inefficient because film-cooling jets can lift off from the material surface that they are intended to protect and draw in or entrain hot gases underneath them.  In addition, film-cooling can increase drag.  Previous efforts to improve the effectiveness of film cooling include shaping the hole near its exit, using slots instead of circular holes, placing tabs at the exit of holes, indenting a region around the film cooling hole, and using compound angles.  However, these efforts may not enable sufficient cooling to satisfy the increasingly higher inlet temperatures desired for maximum efficiency of gas turbine engines or may result in an unacceptable increase in drag.  For example, while previous shaped hole designs have lead to an increase lateral spreading, downstream penetration of the coolant was reduced because the expanding cross-sectional area decreased the momentum of the cooling flow.  To overcome these deficiencies, ISU researchers have developed a new film-cooling shaped hole design that preserves momentum for greater lateral and streamwise coverage.  As a result, significant improvement in film-cooling effectiveness especially at low blowing ratios is observed.

Advantage:
• Keeps the film-cooling flow cross-sectional area nearly constant so that momentum can be preserved to increase both lateral and streamwise coverage of the film-cooling jet.

Application:
Turbine cooling; film cooling

References:
Conference proceedings: “Momentum-Preserving Shaped Holes for Film Cooling”, T. I-P. Shih and S. Na, 54th ASME Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Technical Congress, Exposition, and User Symposium, May14-17, 2006, Montreal, Canada

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3361: Preventing Hot Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jets via Flow-Aligned Blockers

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192593458Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Momentum-Preserving Shaped Holes for Film Cooling”, T. I-P. Shih and S. Na, 54th ASME Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Technical Congress, Exposition, and User Symposium, May14-17, 2006, Montreal, Canada

]]>Group:ISURF #3361: Preventing Hot Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jets via Flow-Aligned Blockers

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Momentum Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped HolesUtilityUnited States7,997,86711/975,06410/17/20078/16/20116/16/20305/7/201511/13/2017FalseBoride-Rich Boron Material for Neutron Detectionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19255Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that can be used to detect nuclear substances

Description:
Neutrons are produced by fission of nuclear materials or by naturally occurring radioactive decay.  Detection of neutrons, for example at transportation hubs, in shipping containers, or in luggage, may indicate the presence of smuggled nuclear material or even hidden nuclear weapons.  However, neutrons are difficult to detect because they lack a charge and conventional neutron detectors require large gas-filled chambers and high voltages.  Efforts to miniaturize neutron detectors through the development of new materials have suffered from drawbacks that include low sensitivity, susceptibility to radiation damage, and lattice strain.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a boride-rich boron material that has utility for neutron detection.  This icosahedral boride semiconducting material has a higher volumetric density of boron atoms than other boride-based neutron detecting materials, can be made an n-type semiconducting material—enabling all boride n-p junctions—and is homogeneous.  In addition, the material can be applied as an amorphous material, with potentially better resistance to radiation damage, as well as a crystalline film.  Since the material can be manufactured using sputtering or pulsed laser deposition, it may thus enable the development of practical and inexpensive neutron detectors with potentially great value in homeland security, industrial safety, and other applications. 

Advantage:
• Effective (the material shows relatively high carrier mobility, even in an amorphous form)

• Flexible (can be applied as amorphous material or crystalline film)

• Safer and more environmentally friendly (can be produced using pulsed laser deposition which does not require the use of toxic gases needed for chemical vapor deposition or other production methods)
• Robust (the material shows less lattice strain for growth on silicon than other boron-based materials)

Application:
Neutron Sensing for Homeland Security and Other Applications

References:
“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192553277Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:27 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:
]]>

]]>
Application:

]]>References:“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740AlMgB14 and Related Icosahedral Boride Semiconducting Materials for Neutron Sensing ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,375,34311/422,6296/7/20065/20/200811/9/20255/7/201511/13/2017FalseLinearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19246Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed fabrication methods for a polarized thermal emitter than can be used to create more efficient thermophotovoltaic devices for power generation.

Description:
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices can be used to generate power from photons, and consist of a thermal emitter and photodiode.  These devices can be used to help overcome limitations of photovoltatic (PV) devices solar cells—since sunlight is composed of many different wavelengths, not all incident photons have an energy larger than the energy band gap (Eg) of the semiconducting material of the photodiode and thus, not all photons can contribute to the photo-current.  If the thermal emitter of a TPV can absorb all incoming photons without discrimination and re-emit photons within a narrow range of energy that is optimized for the Eg of the photodiode, in principle, all energy carried by the incident photons can contribute for electricity generation, which leads results in enhanced energy conversion efficiency.  While thermal radiation from a thermal source is usually unpolarized, a class of micro-structures termed polarized thermal emitters can emit polarized thermal radiation; polarized thermal emitters avoid the energy loss usually incurred by filtering because they preferentially emit photons via their structural anisotropy, and thus can improve the efficiency of TPVs.  ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have now fabricated layer-by-layer photonic crystals that can be used for linearly polarized thermal emission.  This thermal emitter in conjunction with a sub-wavelength grating shows properties that are desirable for polarized thermal emitters for TPVs, including a high extinction ratio and high emissivity.  In addition, the emission range can be tuned by controlling the periodicity of the sub-wavelength grating.  The linearly polarized thermal emitter may thus have utility for improving the efficiency of TPVs used for power generation.

Advantage:
• Highly polarized thermal emission available at normal emergence
• High thermal radiation power
• Tunable emission range

References:
“Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The photonic crystals used to create the polarized thermal emitter have been demonstrated to enable control of both spectral emissivity and polarization in thermal radiation, and samples are available for testing. ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192463583Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

]]>Group:ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals for Linearly-Polarized Thermal Emission and Thermophotovoltaic Device Including SameUtilityUnited States9,400,21912/754,6574/6/20107/26/20164/8/20339/13/201611/13/2017FalseEfficient Polymer Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19212Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for producing more efficient polymer solar cells by increasing light absorption through a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer deposited on a textured substrate.

Description:
So-called first generation photovoltaic or solar cells are based on the use of crystalline silicon wafers.  While improvements in efficiency have been made with these types of solar cells, their high cost has driven research into materials that would be cheaper to use.  Second generation photovoltaic technologies with the potential to be more economical to manufacture include thin-film, organic (polymer or oligomer), and hybrid organic-inorganic cells.  Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have a number of advantages, including manufacturability (roll-to-roll processes on flexible substrates are possible), low-temperature processing, high optical absorption coefficients, and tunability. Unfortunately, OPVs suffer from low power conversion efficiencies, with 7% being among the highest documented experimentally.  To address this problem, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed for a process to produce a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer on textured substrates that improves the efficiency of polymer solar cells by increasing light trapping.  While the use of textured substrates is commonly used in conventional, silicon-based solar cells, attempts to use textured substrates in polymer solar cells have not been successful because they require expensive extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies that can result in a light-absorbing layer with air gaps or sub-optimal coating thickness in the valleys or on the ridges of the substrate pattern; these solar cells can have poor performance due to a loss of charges and short circuiting at the valleys and ridges.  The technology developed by the ISU team overcomes these drawbacks by optimizing the dimensions of the underlying topographical features, enabling a conformal photovoltaic active layer to be coated on the textured substrate.  As consequence, light trapping is enhanced, resulting in more efficient power conversion compared to flat solar cells. Light captured at the red/near infrared band edge is also increased compared to flat solar cells.

Advantage:
• Efficient (light trapping is more effective compared to flat solar cells without compromising electrical characteristics)
• Economical (does not require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies)

Application:
Solar cell manufacturing

References:
1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
An increase in power conversion efficiency of 20 percent compared to flat solar cells made from polymers, as well as an increase in light captured at the red/near infrared band edge of 100 percent over flat cells has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192123847Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseWet Spinning Process of Lignin for Fiber Productionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19195Summary:
The technology enables an economical production of carbon fibers from biorenewable feedstock based on lignin, an abundant byproduct of paper manufacturing and cellulosic derived fuel.

Description:
Due to its complex interconnected structure, lignin is a very brittle biopolymer that cannot be spun, stretched or aligned, and spooled into fibers without modification. However, the potential use of lignin fibers as an economical, biorenewable carbon fiber precursor has made it an attractive compound for investigation.

Iowa State University researchers have devised a method to improve the processability of the lignin-based prescursor so that small diameter lignin fiber can be produced, spun, and stretched prior to pyrolysis into carbon fiber. In the proposed method a commonly available solvent plasticizes the lignin to a degree that allows spinning the resulting fiber into a coagulation bath which easily removes the solvent. Since no thermal or oxidative degradation has occurred during processing, the resulting fibers contain a very high concentration of lignin and are therefore relatively consistent in properties.

Advantage:
• Economical (feedstock is based on low cost, abundant by-product)
• Environmental (uses biorenewable feedstock)
• Simple (use of common fiber spinning technology)

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to bring this technology to market

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191953959Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Iowa State University researchers have devised a method to improve the processability of the lignin-based prescursor so that small diameter lignin fiber can be produced, spun, and stretched prior to pyrolysis into carbon fiber. In the proposed method a commonly available solvent plasticizes the lignin to a degree that allows spinning the resulting fiber into a coagulation bath which easily removes the solvent. Since no thermal or oxidative degradation has occurred during processing, the resulting fibers contain a very high concentration of lignin and are therefore relatively consistent in properties.

]]>Advantage:Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDiisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sourceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19131Summary:
Polyurethane materials completely based on bio-renewable resources have been successfully developed at Iowa State University.

Description:
Polyurethanes are an important class of polymers with uses in a wide variety of materials. The raw materials for production of polyurethanes are polyols and diisocyantes, which are typically derived from petroleum-based feedstocks. While production of polyols from biorenewable sources such as vegetable oils has been successfully developed and implemented in commercially available products, production of diisocyantes from renewable sources has not received as much attention and advancement. In order to provide polyurethane polymers completely based on renewable resources, Iowa State University researchers have successfully enabled a synthesis route for diisocyanates based on “green technology”. This simple and inexpensive method to produce bio-based diisocyanates with required performance characteristics for various polyurethane polymers for use in foams, coatings, elastomers, and other applications is easily adaptable and does not require expensive or exotic catalyst systems.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives and Cross-Linked Resins and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

Advantage:
• Offers complete polyurethane systems based on renewable components
• Simple synthesis route
• Economical method with low energy needs

Application:
Production of Polyurethanes from Renewable Sources

References:
1: Zenner, M. et al. 2013. Polyurethanes from isosorbide-based diisocyanates. Chem. Sus. Chem 6: 1182-1185.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Diisocyanates from succinic anhydride and isosorbide or isomannide have been prepared, and representative polyurethanes that are produced from these diisocyanates have excellent thermal stability and stereochemistry-dependent morphology.  Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to test and commercialize the technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191314032Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:58 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives and Cross-Linked Resins and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Zenner, M. et al. 2013. Polyurethanes from isosorbide-based diisocyanates. Chem. Sus. Chem 6: 1182-1185.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDiisocyanates from succinic anhydride and isosorbide or isomannide have been prepared, and representative polyurethanes that are produced from these diisocyanates have excellent thermal stability and stereochemistry-dependent morphology.  Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to test and commercialize the technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Polyisocyanates from Fused Bicyclic Polyols and Polyurethanes TherefromUtilityUnited States9,556,29314/434,7104/9/20151/31/20174/30/20351/31/201711/13/2017FalseSorbent Assisted Catalyst for the One-Pot Sequestration and Conversion of Renewable Feedstocks into Fuelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19129Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a technology that provides a simplified and economical production of hydrocarbon fuel from renewable resources with higher energy potential compared to ethanol or biodiesel. The ability to achieve higher yields from lipid feedstock, and in particular algae oils, by not utilizing current methods of fatty acid conversion to methyl esters, makes this technology economically attractive. Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to commercialize this technology.

Description:
Conversion of fatty acids to biodiesel has enabled energy properties comparable to conventional fuel sources derived from petroleum products.  However, the use of strong alkali catalysts and elimination of the glycerol waste component from the lipid conversion process reduces the yields obtained from the renewable feedstock. Separation of lipids from various sources such as algae has also presented a significant obstacle to the commercial viability of biorenewable fuels.  In order to achieve the conversion yield of complex, lipid feedstock mixtures comparable to conventional hydrocarbon fuels, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a catalyst system that enables selective adsorption and catalytic conversion of the targeted lipids into hydrocarbons.  The catalyst design enables the production of gasoline or diesel fuels that is chemically equivalent to that derived from petrochemicals without generating a glycerol byproduct.

Advantage:
• Complete conversion of lipids into hydrocarbon fuel
• Economical process
• Catalyst can be recycled

Application:
Fuel Production from Biorenewable Lipid Feedstocks

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Treatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191294075Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngTreatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Adsorbent Catalytic Nanoparticles and Methods of Using the SameUtilityUnited States9,556,08813/691,18111/30/20121/31/20178/3/20351/31/201711/13/2017Catalysts and Methods of Using the SameCIPUnited States9,567,26514/015,2068/30/20132/14/20172/4/20342/16/201711/13/2017FalseFacile and Cost Effective Preparation of Diverse Nanomaterialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19118Summary:
A simple, convenient and general method to synthesize a large variety of nanostructured materials, with different properties and controllable sizes and shapes, was developed by Iowa State University researchers.

Description:
Nanotechnology is a rapidly advancing area of science. Nanomaterials can serve as building blocks or additives for other materials and find new applications in diverse fields. Novel strategies for nanostructure preparation are of fundamental importance in the advancement of science and technology.  However,  much  research  needs  to  be  done  to  find  a  simple, convenient and general method to synthesize a large variety of nanostructured materials with different properties and controllable sizes and shapes. To address this need, Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple, cost effective, generalizable and robust means to create a wide spectrum of different monodispersed nanostructures with controllable sizes and shapes.  These materials can serve as functional nanoscopic building blocks for use in a variety of applications and are ideal for fundamental research in macromolecule science, nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Advantage:
• Controllable (preparation of specific nanomaterial architectures)
• Versatile (synthesis method is applicable to a variety of building blocks)
• Economical (use of low cost materials and process)

Application:
Optics, electronics, optoelectronics, magnetic technologies, sensory materials and devices, drug delivery, biotechnology

References:
1. "Novel Amphiphillic Multi-Arm, Star-Like Block Copolymers as Unimolecular Micelles," Xinchang Pang, Lei Zhao, Mufit Akinc, Jin Kon Kom, and Zhiqun Lin, 2011 Macromolecules 44: 3746-3752.

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191183912Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Novel Amphiphillic Multi-Arm, Star-Like Block Copolymers as Unimolecular Micelles," Xinchang Pang, Lei Zhao, Mufit Akinc, Jin Kon Kom, and Zhiqun Lin, 2011 Macromolecules 44: 3746-3752.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsAmphiphilic Multi-Arm Copolymers and Nanomaterials Derived TherefromUtilityUnited States8,445,57713/189,8007/25/20115/21/20137/25/20315/4/201511/13/2017Amphiphilic Multi-Arm Copolymers and Nanomaterials Derived TherefromDivisionalUnited States8,993,66513/748,7631/24/20133/31/20157/25/20315/4/201511/13/2017FalseDispersion Management with Metamaterialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19668Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

Description:
Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings
• Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable
• Offers customizability and a small footprint

Application:
Telecommunications

References:
1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

A proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196684091Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:45 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

]]>Description:Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

]]>Advantage:Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings ]]>Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable ]]>Offers customizability and a small footprint]]>Application:Telecommunications

]]>References:1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngA proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersion Management with MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,588,25514/494,1749/23/20143/7/201711/21/20346/21/201711/13/2017FalseImproved Benzobisoxazole Polymers for Organic Semiconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19102Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed new benzobisoxazole polymers with improved properties for applications in the emerging field of organic semiconductors.

Description:
Benzobisoxazoles (BBOs) have potential for use as building blocks in the creation of semiconducting polymers because they increase the electron affinity, electron transport, and oxidative and thermal stability of materials incorporating them.  In addition, the starting materials for synthesis of BBOs are low cost, allowing for economical large scale production.  However, the use of polybenzobisoxazoles has been limited by their poor solubility and prossessivity; since they tend to pi-stack, the morphology of films cast from them can be affected.  In addition, research on n-type (electron accepting, electron transporting) organic materials has lagged behind that of p-type (electron accepting, hole transporting) because their synthesis is difficult, limiting structural modifications directed at optimization of properties such as solubility, electron affinity, and electron mobility. To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed new BBO copolymers that incorporate the beneficial properties of the BBO moiety while improving solubility and processivity by disrupting pi-stacking between polymer chains.  As a consequence, efficient synthesis of solution processable, tunable, n-type co-polymers is enabled, and the utility of these new BBOs has been demonstrated by fabricating organic light emitting devices with increased luminous efficiencies.

Advantage:
• Tunable
• Solution processable
• N-type conjugation facilitates electron transfer

Application:
Organic electronic devices

References:
1: Intemann, J. et al. 2012. Altering the conjugation pathway for improved performance of benzobisoxazole-based polymer guest emitters in polymer light-emitting diodes.  Macromolecules 45: 6888–6897.

2: Hellerich, E. S. et al. 2013. Fluorescent polymer guest: small molecule host solution-processed OLEDs. J. Mater. Chem. C 1:5191-5199.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

The new BBOs have been used to make BBO-based polymer light emitting diodes with luminous efficiencies that are three-fold higher than previously reported, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191024094Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:44 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers have developed new benzobisoxazole polymers with improved properties for applications in the emerging field of organic semiconductors.

]]>Description:Benzobisoxazoles (BBOs) have potential for use as building blocks in the creation of semiconducting polymers because they increase the electron affinity, electron transport, and oxidative and thermal stability of materials incorporating them.  In addition, the starting materials for synthesis of BBOs are low cost, allowing for economical large scale production.  However, the use of polybenzobisoxazoles has been limited by their poor solubility and prossessivity; since they tend to pi-stack, the morphology of films cast from them can be affected.  In addition, research on n-type (electron accepting, electron transporting) organic materials has lagged behind that of p-type (electron accepting, hole transporting) because their synthesis is difficult, limiting structural modifications directed at optimization of properties such as solubility, electron affinity, and electron mobility. To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed new BBO copolymers that incorporate the beneficial properties of the BBO moiety while improving solubility and processivity by disrupting pi-stacking between polymer chains.  As a consequence, efficient synthesis of solution processable, tunable, n-type co-polymers is enabled, and the utility of these new BBOs has been demonstrated by fabricating organic light emitting devices with increased luminous efficiencies.

]]>Advantage:Tunable ]]>Solution processable ]]>N-type conjugation facilitates electron transfer]]>Application:Organic electronic devices

]]>References:1: Intemann, J. et al. 2012. Altering the conjugation pathway for improved performance of benzobisoxazole-based polymer guest emitters in polymer light-emitting diodes.  Macromolecules 45: 6888–6897.

2: Hellerich, E. S. et al. 2013. Fluorescent polymer guest: small molecule host solution-processed OLEDs. J. Mater. Chem. C 1:5191-5199. ]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngThe new BBOs have been used to make BBO-based polymer light emitting diodes with luminous efficiencies that are three-fold higher than previously reported, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsConjugated Polymer and Semiconductor Devices Including the SameUtilityUnited States9,023,96414/207,0333/12/20145/5/20153/12/20345/8/201511/13/2017FalseBiorenewable Biopolymers for Use as Carbon Fiber Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19667Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

Description:
As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

Advantage:
• Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)
• Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)

Application:
Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

References:
Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
The feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png

 

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196674056Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:43 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

]]>Description:As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

]]>Advantage:Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)]]>Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)]]>Application:Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

]]>References:Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngThe feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Process of Making Carbon Fibers From Compositions Including Esterified Lignin and Poly (Lactic Acid)UtilityUnited States9,340,42514/048,53210/8/20135/17/20167/26/20345/24/201611/13/2017FalseImproved Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ Passivationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19666Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

Description:
Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

Advantage:
• Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.
• Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.

Application:
Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

References:
“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196663993Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:42 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

]]>Description:Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

]]>Advantage:Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.]]>Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.]]>Application:Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

]]>References:“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ PassivationUtilityUnited States9,650,30913/986,1934/10/20135/16/20177/13/20346/21/201711/13/2017FalseModification of Wettability Properties of Copper for Heat Transfer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19687

Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated enhanced heat transfer efficiency for phase change operations.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have produced biphilic copper surfaces by chemical modification of the surface. Using this method, spatially controlled hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas exist proximately on a single surface; the hydrophilic areas promote contact between the liquid phase and the heat transfer surface, leading to an enhancement in the critical heat flux, while the hydrophobic areas increase nucleation sites, resulting in an enhanced heat transfer coefficient. Discrete patterns can be created to further enhance the efficiency of boiling and promote energy efficiency.

Advantage:
• Micropatterning of copper produces biphillic surface to both promote nucleation and enhance the contact of liquid water to the surface
• Coating-free method provides long-term surface treatment

Application:
Heat exchangers, boilers

References:
“Boiling heat transfer on superhyrdophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces”, A.R. Betz et al., 2012, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 57: 733-741

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Development Stage:
Stage1.png

Desc0000.png

 

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196874235Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:41 GMTSummary:
]]>Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated enhanced heat transfer efficiency for phase change operations.

]]>Description: ]]>Iowa State University researchers have produced biphilic copper surfaces by chemical modification of the surface. Using this method, spatially controlled hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas exist proximately on a single surface; the hydrophilic areas promote contact between the liquid phase and the heat transfer surface, leading to an enhancement in the critical heat flux, while the hydrophobic areas increase nucleation sites, resulting in an enhanced heat transfer coefficient. Discrete patterns can be created to further enhance the efficiency of boiling and promote energy efficiency.

]]>Advantage: ]]>Micropatterning of copper produces biphillic surface to both promote nucleation and enhance the contact of liquid water to the surface ]]>Coating-free method provides long-term surface treatment]]>Application: ]]>Heat exchangers, boilers

]]>References: ]]>“Boiling heat transfer on superhyrdophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces”, A.R. Betz et al., 2012, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 57: 733-741

]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDevelopment Stage:Stage1.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAnisotropic Buckypaper Fabrication through Shear Alignmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19686Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the ability to create anisotropic buckypaper by filtration of a water-borne carbon nanotube solution in a shear field;  the shear forces cause the carbon nanotubes to align along the direction of fluid flow.

Description:
Alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) has long been known to provide exceptional stain, electrical and other properties.  Unfortunately, traditional methods utilizing electric fields, magnetic fields and mechanical stretching are costly and difficult to scale to production volumes.

Advantage:
• Moderate shear rate provides high degree of anisotropy
• Low cost, scalable procedure

Application:
Carbon composite materials

References:

1: “Anistropic buckypaper through shear-induced mechanical alignment of carbon nanotubes in water”, D. Vennerberg and M. Kessler, 2014,Carbon, 80:433-439, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2014.08.082.


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png


Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196864169Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:40 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the ability to create anisotropic buckypaper by filtration of a water-borne carbon nanotube solution in a shear field;  the shear forces cause the carbon nanotubes to align along the direction of fluid flow.

]]>Description:Alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) has long been known to provide exceptional stain, electrical and other properties.  Unfortunately, traditional methods utilizing electric fields, magnetic fields and mechanical stretching are costly and difficult to scale to production volumes.

]]>Advantage:Moderate shear rate provides high degree of anisotropy]]>Low cost, scalable procedure]]>Application:Carbon composite materials

]]>References:1: “Anistropic buckypaper through shear-induced mechanical alignment of carbon nanotubes in water”, D. Vennerberg and M. Kessler, 2014,Carbon, 80:433-439, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2014.08.082.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsFalseBiorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resinshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19095Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a single step method for generating tackifiers from isosobide and cyclic anhydrides that does not produce waste.

Description:
Tackifiers are added to materials to impart tack, or immediate stickiness, and are used in formulating adhesives.  Tackifiers can often be the most costly component of an adhesive, and existing tackifiers come from three major sources: petroleum-based hydrocarbon resins, plant-derived rosin resins and terpene resins. Rosin resins are not compatible with all surfaces, and are not sourced from rapidly growing renewable sources while resins based on hydrocarbons are subject to fluctuating costs. ISU researchers have now developed a method for producing biorenewable, molecularly well-defined and tunable tackifiers at competitive pricing.  The tackifiers are produced in one step from isosorbide and cyclic anhydrides.  Water solubility and performance temperature can be tuned by the selection of the anhydride.  In addition, the tackifiers can be cured to create highly cross-linked polymers. These tackifiers are economical to produce and may have utility for a wide variety of industrial applications that require adhesives.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources, and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

Advantage:
• Simple (tackifiers are produced in a single step from isosorbides and cyclic anhydrides)
• Tunable (choice of anhydride can result in tackifiers that are water soluble or insoluble)
• Versatile (a variety of adhesives, including highly cross-linked polymers, can be made using this approach)
• Biorenewable (inputs may be made from easily grown biorenewable sources)

Application:
Production of tackifiers for use in a variety of adhesives applications

Development Stage:
Stage3.png

A variety of tackifiers with various properties have been made, and facile scale up to a kilogram level has been achieved.

Desc0000.png

]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/190954118Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources, and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

]]>Advantage:• Simple (tackifiers are produced in a single step from isosorbides and cyclic anhydrides)]]>• Tunable (choice of anhydride can result in tackifiers that are water soluble or insoluble)]]>• Versatile (a variety of adhesives, including highly cross-linked polymers, can be made using this approach)]]>• Biorenewable (inputs may be made from easily grown biorenewable sources)]]>Application:

]]>]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740MaterialsTackifier Compounds and Methods of Using the SameUtilityUnited States9,688,79414/434,7194/9/20156/27/20177/29/20357/17/201711/13/2017FalseProduction of Low-Cost Carbon Catalyst Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19679Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple, one-step method for producing carbon materials containing multiple, stable catalytic sites that has utility for the production of low-cost heterogeneous catalysts.

Description:
Homogeneous acid catalysts are commonly used for the production of industrially important chemicals.  However, despite their low material costs, homogeneous catalysts add cost to the process because of the expense associated with separation, recycling and treatment of the waste sulfuric acid. To address these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a low-cost method for the creation of compounds consisting of a carbon backbone with covalently-bonded acid or base groups that have utility as hydrothermally stable carbon catalyst materials.  For example, these materials could be used as strong acid heterogeneous catalysts for reactors operating under hydrothermal conditions, which is important for reactions involving biological feedstocks.  In addition, the technology enables incorporation of a wide variety of functional groups into carbon materials by simply changing the bifunctional reactant.  This technology may also have application in areas such as electrochemistry and electronics since the functional groups can coordinate metal cations, useful for synthesis of nano-composite materials with a range of metals and metal combinations or used as colloidal materials.

Advantage:
• Low cost and simple chemistry
• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions
• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios

Application:
Heterogeneous catalysts

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
This method has been used for the synthesis of nano-composite materials with ferro magnetic particles with very high (40%) metal loadings that can subsequently be dispersed into thin films.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196794178Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Low cost and simple chemistry]]>• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions]]>• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNanotwinned Silver Alloy Films with Controlled Architectureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19677Summary:
Researchers working at the Ames Laboratory have developed a sputtering technique to readily synthesize silver alloy film architectures in which the nanostructure can be readily designed over a single substrate in order to tailor the mechanical properties of the film.

Description:
Nanotwinned (nt) metals exhibit high strengths, but unlike their nanocrystalline counterparts, nt metals can also exhibit large uniform tensile ductility. Strength and ductility in nt metals are both strongly dependent on the structure.  Ames Laboratory researchers have recently developed a sputtering technique that enables the synthesis of films made of nt silver alloys in which the processing conditions can be used to control the nanostructure architecture; designing specific structures, the plasticity mechanisms that also control the bulk mechanical response can also be varied. As a consequence, films with thicknesses ranging from nanometer to greater than hundreds of microns that combine very high tensile strengths (> 500 MPa) with excellent electrical conductivities that are comparable to pure, coarse grained silver.  This technology may have utility for commercial applications in electronics—for example in the interconnects for flexible displays, where high strength is needed to prevent premature due to repeated mechanical loading along with high conductivity.

Advantage:
• Enables creation of silver alloy films of varying thickness that have very high strength and high conductivity
• Allows mechanical properties of the film to be tailored

Application:
 thin film coatings, electronic displays

References:
Ott, R. T. et al. 2013. Tailoring the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals through structural design. Proceedings of Materials Science & Technology Conference, Montreal, Canada

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
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A continuous silver film on a six inch substrate has been deposited, allowing for structures and properties to be tailored to the substrate in a single deposition run.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196774108Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Enables creation of silver alloy films of varying thickness that have very high strength and high conductivity]]>Allows mechanical properties of the film to be tailored]]>Application:

]]>References:Ott, R. T. et al. 2013. Tailoring the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals through structural design. Proceedings of Materials Science & Technology Conference, Montreal, Canada

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials| Ames LaboratoryFalsePassivation of reactive gas atomized titanium aluminide powderhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19675Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to control and retain halogen alloy additions to titanium aluminide powders in the form of a surface film.

Description:
Doping of titanium aluminide with small concentration of halogen atoms has been demonstrated to greatly enhance the resistance of the metal to oxidation.  Previous methods to create a thin, halogen containing exterior film such as ion-implantation have proven ineffective, and alternate powder metallurgy approaches provide little control over the amount of halogen incorporated into the powders.  The tailored in situ powder coating approach presented here provides for the incorporation of halogen in an alloy microstructure as an oxy-halogen by powder consolidation.  This chemical reservoir of oxy-halogen promotes renewable formation of a nanometer-scale exterior protective film with higher thermal stability and increased surface oxidation resistance.

Advantage:
• Reduces pyrophoriscity of atomized titanium aluminide powder
• Increases oxidation resistance for high temperature operation

Application:
Titanium powders for high temperature components

References:
1: "Performance of Composite Pour Tubes for Titanium Close Coupled Atomization”, A. Heidloff, TITANIUM 2012, Hilton Atlanta, Atlanta, October 2012.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196754110Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:28 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to control and retain halogen alloy additions to titanium aluminide powders in the form of a surface film.

]]>Description:Doping of titanium aluminide with small concentration of halogen atoms has been demonstrated to greatly enhance the resistance of the metal to oxidation.  Previous methods to create a thin, halogen containing exterior film such as ion-implantation have proven ineffective, and alternate powder metallurgy approaches provide little control over the amount of halogen incorporated into the powders.  The tailored in situ powder coating approach presented here provides for the incorporation of halogen in an alloy microstructure as an oxy-halogen by powder consolidation.  This chemical reservoir of oxy-halogen promotes renewable formation of a nanometer-scale exterior protective film with higher thermal stability and increased surface oxidation resistance.

]]>Advantage:• Reduces pyrophoriscity of atomized titanium aluminide powder ]]>• Increases oxidation resistance for high temperature operation]]>Application:Titanium powders for high temperature components

]]>References:1: "Performance of Composite Pour Tubes for Titanium Close Coupled Atomization”, A. Heidloff, TITANIUM 2012, Hilton Atlanta, Atlanta, October 2012.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials| Ames LaboratoryFalse