Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:00:31 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:00:31 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityRoom Temperature Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 MRI Contrast Agenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21035Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to create gadolinium silicide nanoparticles which retain ferromagnetic properties at room temperature.

Description:
This innovative method creates Gd5Si4 nanoparticles that retain the ferromagnetic properties of the bulk material at room temperature. These nanoparticles may be useful as a MRI contrast agent or for other applications that would benefit from materials that highly respond to a magnetic field, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, MRI thermometry, and hyperthermic cancer treatment.

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

Advantage:
• Increased magnetic properties compared to existing MRI contrast agents

Application:
MRI contrast agent; transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperthermic cancer treatment

References:
1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210354379Fri, 15 Sep 2017 15:12:12 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Imaging| Life Sciences| MaterialsFalseLogarithmic Photo-Converter with Huge Dynamic Rangehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26090Summary:
This device is capable of measuring optical light levels that may vary from the single photon level up to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations. In fact, the upper range can be almost, apart from practical spatial details, as large as one desires. This device is possible due to the fact that the SiPMs can be exposed to daylight at full voltage without damage.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Light sources that fluctuate by huge factors, from single photons up to 106 to 109 photons, are not common but do occur in the forward regions of particle colliders. They may also occur in bioluminescent materials over slower times scales, and possibly in optical measurements in non-destructive evaluation where the light level is varied over orders of magnitude to assess damage to a material.

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.

Advantage:
• Simultaneously sensitive to single photos and to arbitrarily large light levels
• Dynamic range can be calibrated after manufacture
• Input light does not have to be filtered or modified
• Accepts all incident light

Application:
Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.

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]]>Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:10:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/260904612Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:13:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMetamaterials-Based Device for Generation of Broadband Terahertz Radiationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21453Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a metamaterials-based terahertz emitter that could drastically improve communication speeds and imaging resolution.

Description:
The terahertz gap, which lies between the infrared and millimeter spectral regions (from approximately 100 GHz to 15THz) poses one of the most demanding challenges for technology and fundamental science today. The lack of efficient light sources and detectors makes THz physics one of the least explored parts of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. This is despite the underlying demand in the fields of communication and sensing, to push the gigahertz switching speed limit of today’s logic/memory/wireless communication devices into the terahertz range and to extend the conventional visible/infrared spectrum of today’s security and medical imaging devices into the THz spectrum, which provides more transparency and has more distinct spatial signatures suitable for non-invasive and label-free imaging.

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

Advantage:
• Faster communication/computing speeds
• Further miniaturization of devices
• Improved resolution imaging
• Label-free evaluation
• Metamaterial-based emitter outperforms thin film and crystal-based emitters

Application:
Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and Scientific

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]]>Mon, 22 Feb 2016 12:25:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/214534109Mon, 17 Jul 2017 14:25:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and ScientificStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Broadband Terahertz Generation of MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,684,22114/989,5651/6/20166/20/20171/6/20367/17/20179/1/2017FalseImproved Spinach Aptamer Ligandshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25064Summary:
Improved spinach (and broccoli) aptamer ligands for in vitro applications delivering increased signal intensity when associated with the target aptamer.

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Description:
Light-up aptamers,which create a fluorescent signal on binding to their ligands, are promising sensors for in vitro homogeneous assays and for in vivo applications. When linked to other aptamers of defined specificity that drive their ability to bind ligand, these light-up aptamers can report on the presence of analytes in vitro that range from metabolites to proteins.
The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

Advantage:
• Increased signal strength
• Suitability for in vitro application
• Facile chemical synthesis protocols

References:
Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:07:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/250644502Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:08:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:The Spinach aptamer creates a fluorescent signal on binding its 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone ligand (DFHBI). DFHBI is widely used, despite having limitations such as low affinity and short fluorescent lifetime. This innovation introduces a new higher affinity ligands for Spinach aptamers including PFP-DFHBI, GSK132, and 11 additional derivatives. For example, PFP-DFHBI binds with a 40-fold higher affinity under intracellular conditions and a 3-fold increase in fluorescence yield as compared with DFHBI. Additional research favors the GK132 derivative as the optimal ligand.

]]>Advantage:

]]>References:Ilgu, M., et al., Light-up and fret aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells. Methods, 2015. 98: p. 26-33

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHigh-Throughput Large Scale Plant Phenotyping Instrumentationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21041Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a microfluidic device to screen genotype-to-phenotype interactions.

Description:
Through an array of miniature greenhouses (MGHs), vertical microfluidic seed chips (MSCs), and microfluidic control logic. The plant growth system can provide maximal environmental flexibility in large- and multi-scale study of plant-environment interactions. Each MGH can flexibly regulate relative humidity (RH), C02 level, and light intensity via controlled microfluidic capillary filling, controlled chemical reaction, and liquid crystal technologies, respectively. The ve1tical MSCs are designed to be sliding chip-like disposable components for use inside the MGHs.  Useful for monitoring plant pathogen interactions, phenotyping of Arapidopsis plants at the whole organism and cellular level.

Advantage:
• High spatial and temporal resolution
• Easy to use, cost effective
• Allows seamless monitoring of both root and shoot phenotypes
• Easily fabricated using conventional soft lithography

Application:
High throughput plant phenotype assays at the whole organism and cellular level

References:
1. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis. Jiang H1, Xu Z, Aluru MR, Dong L. Lab Chip. 2014 Apr 7;14(7):1281-93.

2. A microfluidic whole-plant phenotyping device, Jiang, H.,  Xu, Z., Aluru, M.R.; Dong, L.
Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXVII), 2013 Transducers & Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference.

3. Iowa State engineer builds instrument to study effects of genes, environment on plant traits

4. YouTube video

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:16:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210414223Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:20:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis. Jiang H1, Xu Z, Aluru MR, Dong L. Lab Chip. 2014 Apr 7;14(7):1281-93.

2. A microfluidic whole-plant phenotyping device, Jiang, H.,  Xu, Z., Aluru, M.R.; Dong, L.
Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXVII), 2013 Transducers & Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference.

3. Iowa State engineer builds instrument to study effects of genes, environment on plant traits

4. YouTube video

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMultimodal applications for mesoporous silica nanoparticles in contrast imaginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21064Description:
A novel multimodal nanomaterial contrast agent with unique capability for in vivo and in biomedical imaging has been developed. The particle is designed to elicit a significant signal compared to organs, tissues and cells examined with CT, MRI Echo as well Fluorescence Microscopy. This invention is the “Swiss Army knife” approach to contrast imaging techniques. The particle is based on a backbone of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN), a 200 nm diameter particle with 3-5 nm pores that can be loaded with a drug or reagent of interest. The surface of MSN and/or the silica framework is covalently functionalized with one or more of the following materials: gadolinium oxide, gold, -CF3 functional groups, and/or a fluorophore such as FITC or Texas Red. These materials can then be detected with one or more of the following imaging modalities: magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging, or fluorescence microscopy. The particles have the propensity to bind and gain entry into a variety of cells through nonspecific (engulfed) or specific (extracellular binding molecules) labeling methods. The particle can also selectively bind cells using receptor ligands, which make this useful to biomedical research as well as drug delivery. The particle’s versatility makes it a potentially powerful tool for both clinical and research purposes.

Advantage:
• Effective in vivo
• Inert material that is biocompatible

Application:
Biomedical imaging, biomedical research, drug delivery

References:
U.S. Patent Application 2015/0125398

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210644023Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:16 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:U.S. Patent Application 2015/0125398]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Imaging| Life SciencesFalse3D Shape Measurement with Binary Dithered Patternshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21038Summary:
Construction technique for construction of high quality 3-D images

Description:
Iowa State University Researchers have developed a binary defocusing technique for three-dimensional (3D) shape measurement.   The technique produces H:igh quality sinusoidal patterns by using a technique currently used in digital signal processing.  This image processing method uses dithering (half-toning) to produce high-quality 3D images.  A projector creates the image and the fringe patterns are captured using an imaging device.   Fringe analysis and optimization is then used to reconstruct the 3D shape of the object.  The phase error is less than 0.6% even when the fringe stripes are wide and the projector is nearly focused.

Advantage:
• Simple to implement
• Enables pixel-level resolution
• Relatively high speed

Application:
3-D Imaging

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3674: Hybrid Model for 3D Shape Measurement, and ISURF 3821: 3-D Shape Compression Using Holoimage, and ISURF 4000: 3D Range Data Compression with Computer Graphics Tools, and ISURF 4168: Absolute Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Using Coded Fringe Patterns Without Phase Unwrapping or Projector Calibration

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 12:42:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210384024Mon, 07 Dec 2015 12:50:55 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 3674: Hybrid Model for 3D Shape Measurement, and ISURF 3821: 3-D Shape Compression Using Holoimage, and ISURF 4000: 3D Range Data Compression with Computer Graphics Tools, and ISURF 4168: Absolute Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Using Coded Fringe Patterns Without Phase Unwrapping or Projector Calibration

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-47403D Shape Measurement Using DitheringUtilityUnited States8,929,64413/732,5481/2/20131/6/20157/28/203312/7/20155/24/2017FalseDual-Color Auto-Calibration Scanning-Angle Evanescent Field Microscopehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19664Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new microscope that can be used for live cell imaging as well as for examining single molecule dynamics.

Description:
Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is a mode of fluorescence microscopy that has been widely used for live-cell imaging at the interface between a biological sample and a cover slip or tissue culture well.  TIRFM is based on the induction of an evanescent wave in the liquid adjacent to the interface, which is created when reflected light penetrates the interface, propagates parallel to the surface of the plane of incidence, and decays exponentially with distance.  There are two basic TIRFM systems: prism-based and objective based.  Prism-based systems are preferable since they have lower costs, wider range of incident angles, less excitation light scattering, and higher accuracy in the incident angle determination.  However, the prism-based method has geographical constraints on sample manipulation–it is difficult to recalibrate the system manually for all incident angles–and because image reconstruction can be difficult.   To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an innovative dual-color auto-calibration scanning-angle evanescent field microscope that is easier to operate and more reproducible than existing approaches.  This microscope has utility for live-cell imaging to examine cellular organization and dynamic processes that occur in the  cell/ substrate contact regions.  A computer-controlled automatic high-precision calibration procedure is used to find the incident angles in the full range, and this microscope is able to achieve better axial resolution than currently available systems.

Advantage:
• Permits high axial resolution (5-10 nm)
• Provides quick and automatic creation of an evanescent field for any incident angle in the full range
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Allows rapid re-calibration of new samples
• Enables fine adjustment of the optical trapping forces created by the evanescent field

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Development Stage:
The new microscope with an automatic high-precision calibration procedure has been tested under laboratory conditions and is available for demonstration. The entire auto calibration procedure was demonstrated to be complete within minutes and incident angles in the full range (from subcritical angles to nearly 90º) with intervals as small as 0.02º were identified.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196643750Tue, 03 Nov 2015 13:20:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Auto-calibrated Scanning-angle Prism-type Total Internal Reflection Microscopy for Nanometer-precision Axial Position Determination and Optional Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo Total Internal Reflection MicroscopyUtilityUnited States9,012,87213/006,7391/14/20114/21/201512/25/20316/1/20152/27/2017FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseStanding Wave Axial Nanometry (SWAN) for Superresolution Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19669Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have an approach for performing 3-D measurements of single molecules with nanometer accuracy and precision.

Description:
Despite its importance as a research tool for understanding cellular functions, the optical resolution of light microscopy has imposed limitations on observing and measuring cellular components and structures. The advent of superresolution microscopy techniques, which enable imaging of nanostructures and processes at X-Y resolutions of approximately 20 nm, opens new opportunities for exploring cell biology and has many other applications.  However, current superresolution microscopy approaches may have limitations with respect to whether live or fixed cells can be imaged because of image acquisition and processing speed, and may also have limitations in terms of resolution along the Z axis.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new technique call SWAN (standing wave axial nanometry) for determining the axial location of nanoscale fluorescent objects with sub-nanometer accuracy and several nanometer precision.  Unlike other approaches, SWAN does not require custom optics or specially engineered substrates, which makes it easy to use with biological samples and live cells. SWAN can be easily integrated with other super-resolution and super-accuracy techniques to image with nanometer resolution along the lateral and axial directions.  As a consequence, this approach has broad utility for a variety of applications, such as life science research (e.g., biomolecular interactions, structure-function studies, cell imaging), drug discovery (e.g., direct observation of targeted drug delivery and drug interactions in vitro and in living cells and tissues), nanotechnology (e.g., characterization of nanoscale materials), material science (characterization of materials with novel optical properties), and optical MEMs devices by improving their efficiency through more accurate and precise imaging.

Advantage:
• Can be used with biological materials and living cells
• Extends working range
• Enables imaging with nanometer resolution along lateral and axial directions
• Does not require custom optics
• Can be used for single molecule AFM force measurement

Application:
Imaging for life sciences research, drug discovery, nanotechnology, materials science and optical MEMS devices.

References:
“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Proof-of-concept and utility has been demonstrated by using SWAN to measure the orientation of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths that were tethered to surfaces with different functionalities.  Commercialization partners are being sought for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196694045Wed, 12 Aug 2015 07:52:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and PrecisionUtilityUnited States9,103,78414/081,52211/15/20138/11/201511/15/20338/12/20152/27/2017FalseNovel Method for Wide Field-View Imaginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19662Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has developed a compact device that enables very wide field of view imaging and may lay the foundation for artificial eyes that mimic those of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod.

Description:
Imaging devices with very wide field-of-view (FOV) have many potential applications, including endoscopes for biomedical applications, robotics and automation, and in security and assistive technologies.  For many of these applications, having a light weight, compact device is highly desirable.  However, many wide FOV devices that have been developed are based on conventional optics and tend to be bulky and heavy.  Other development efforts have focused on mimicking solutions found in nature such as artificial compound eyes found in insects and crustaceans.  However, the realization of biomimetic artificial eyes has not been entirely successful due to the difficulty in assembling the compound eye’s vision units hemispherically as well as the difficulty in optically connecting the curved optical front-end (i.e., the microlenses, spacers and incidence angle-discriminating elements) to a flat detector array.  To overcome these obstacles, an ISU researcher has developed a MEMS (micro-electrical-mechanical systems) imaging system that mimics the compound eye of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod which uses polymer fibers to provide flexible optical connections between the microlenses and photodetectors.  In addition to providing a hemispherical imaging of panoramic objects, this system has the potential to enable dynamically tunable FOV and is fabricated using soft lithographic replica-molding techniques amenable to mass production.  As a consequence, this imaging system may be useful for a wide variety of applications, including biomedical instrumentation, surveillance, and assistive devices.

Advantage:
• Simpler fabrication
• Multi-functionality
• Dynamic control of the field-of-view

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A membrane with a “fibers in a chamber” structure has been fabricated and shown to respond well to both inflation and deflation actuations; in addition, HeNe beams passed through the fibers have shown that they function as waveguides, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196623788Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:43:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Elastomeric Device for Tunable ImagingUtilityUnited States8,351,10613/180,6687/12/20111/8/20137/12/20316/1/20152/27/2017FalseObserver Based Q Control for Scanning Probe Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19304Summary:
Method for decreasing the cantilever damping coefficient resulting in increased resolution in atomic force miscroscopy

Description:
Examination of the surface properties of inorganic and biological materials at the molecular level can be performed using atomic force microscopy. In atomic force microscopy, the desired bandwidth or resolution can be achieved by active quality factor, or Q, control. Currently used Q control methods result in a trade-off between resolution and bandwidth. To simultaneously improve both bandwidth and resolution, ISU researchers have developed an observer-based Q control method that enables the cantilever to behave like a mass-spring-damper system. This method overcomes difficulties encountered in currently used active Q-control systems that are incurred when the damping coefficient of the cantilever increases, resulting in decreased resolution when damping occurs in air, or reduced scan speed when the cantilever is controlled under fluids.

Advantage:
• Detects high bandwidth content of sample features
• High probability for detecting small sample features
• Increases flexibility: improves resolution when the cantilever is operated in air 
• increases scan speed when the cantilever is operated under fluids

Application:
Atomic force microscopy; scanning probe microscopy

References:
“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

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Development Stage:
Observer-based Q control has been shown experimentally to increase bandwidth content features of samples while preserving resolution

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193043299Wed, 13 May 2015 11:57:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Observer Based Q-Control Imaging Methods for Atomic Force MicroscopyUtilityUnited States7,627,43811/796,2054/27/200712/1/20097/19/20275/8/20158/15/2017FalseMicroscope for Simultaneous Single Molecule AFM and Fluorescence Measurementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19117Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an integrated single molecule atomic force fluorescence microscope (smAFM-FM) that can perform multiple single molecule measurements.

Description:
Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy Transfer (FRET) and single molecule force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) are two widely used and powerful techniques that have advanced research in the biological sciences. However each of these techniques suffers from limitations in terms of the types of single molecule measurements they can perform.  For instance, it is difficult to examine structural changes in molecules as they interact using a stand-alone AFM, while when using FRET alone, it is difficult to monitor optical changes in materials when forces are applied.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microscope that combines a single molecule AFM-FRET approach to study molecules and nanoscale objects.  This new instrument enables multiple single molecule measurements, including AFM-FRET intensity and lifetime measurements, AFM-fluorescence intensity and spectral measurements, AFM-photon antibunching experiments, and AFM-Raman measurements.  The smAFM-FM has potential applications for life science research (such as determining the structure and dynamics of molecular interactions of biomolecules), drug discovery (such as direct observation of drug delivery and drug-target interactions in vitro and in cells or tissues), characterization of the optical properties of nanomaterials such as nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, nanotubes, etc., material science, and the optical MEMs industry (design of optical switches, pressure sensors, disk-drive, heads and biosensors). The utility of the smAFM-FM has been demonstrated by measuring the force dependence of the optical properties of CdS/CdSe tetrapod, an important semiconductor nanocrystal.

Advantage:
• Combines the features and benefits of AFM and FRET microscopy to apply forces on single molecules or nanoscale objects and simultaneously monitor their structure, dynamics and optical properties.

Application:
Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.

Development Stage:
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Proof of concept has been demonstrated using the smAFM-FM instrument to measure force-dependent optical properties of nano-scale objects, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191173855Thu, 07 May 2015 07:55:49 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:Application:Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System, Apparatus, and Method for Simultaneous Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence MeasurementsUtilityUnited States8,656,51013/569,9278/8/20122/18/20148/8/20325/4/20156/21/2017False