Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:03:48 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:03:48 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityRoom Temperature Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 MRI Contrast Agenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21035Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to create gadolinium silicide nanoparticles which retain ferromagnetic properties at room temperature.

Description:
This innovative method creates Gd5Si4 nanoparticles that retain the ferromagnetic properties of the bulk material at room temperature. These nanoparticles may be useful as a MRI contrast agent or for other applications that would benefit from materials that highly respond to a magnetic field, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, MRI thermometry, and hyperthermic cancer treatment.

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

Advantage:
• Increased magnetic properties compared to existing MRI contrast agents

Application:
MRI contrast agent; transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperthermic cancer treatment

References:
1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210354379Fri, 15 Sep 2017 15:12:12 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Imaging| Life Sciences| MaterialsFalseImmunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Researchhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19191Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified pigs that have a severely impaired immune system that could serve as important biomedical model for the study of immune system and other diseases in humans.

Description:
Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a genetic defect that causes newborn animals to lack T or B cells in circulation and to have few or no lymphocytes in their primary or secondary lymphoid tissues.  SCID has been shown to have an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in certain mouse strains as well as in horses, some dog breeds, and humans, but is perhaps best known as the ‘bubble boy’ disease, which is an X-linked version of SCID in humans.  Affected neonates do not show clinical manifestations of the defect while suckling.  However, as maternal antibody wanes, the animals become susceptible to opportunistic infections to which they inexorably succumb. ISU researchers and their colleagues at Kansas State University have recently identified a SCID-like syndrome in a line of pigs originally bred for traits related to feed efficiency.  Because of the closer physiological resemblance between humans and pigs, these animals may have utility as a biomedical model for SCID and immunodeficiency diseases in humans that is more suitable than the current mouse models.  In addition, the anatomical and physiological similarities between humans and pigs would make these SCID pigs a superior biomedical model for research into cell and tissue transplantation, cancer research and efficacy of chemotherapeutics, as well as for testing new vaccines.

Advantage:
• More clinically relevant model for investigation of human immunodeficiency, cancer, and other diseases

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

Development Stage:
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Matings that produced the affected pigs have been repeated and all litters have been confirmed to have at least one affected pig; genotyping analysis is in process.  ISU is seeking commercialization partners for these valuable research animals.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191913992Fri, 08 Sep 2017 09:24:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

]]>Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLogarithmic Photo-Converter with Huge Dynamic Rangehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26090Summary:
This device is capable of measuring optical light levels that may vary from the single photon level up to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations. In fact, the upper range can be almost, apart from practical spatial details, as large as one desires. This device is possible due to the fact that the SiPMs can be exposed to daylight at full voltage without damage.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Light sources that fluctuate by huge factors, from single photons up to 106 to 109 photons, are not common but do occur in the forward regions of particle colliders. They may also occur in bioluminescent materials over slower times scales, and possibly in optical measurements in non-destructive evaluation where the light level is varied over orders of magnitude to assess damage to a material.

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.

Advantage:
• Simultaneously sensitive to single photos and to arbitrarily large light levels
• Dynamic range can be calibrated after manufacture
• Input light does not have to be filtered or modified
• Accepts all incident light

Application:
Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.

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]]>Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:10:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/260904612Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:13:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProbiotic treatment of gut inflammationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25990Summary:
A screening methodology to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains and strains identified using such methodology.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Probiotics are live organisms that confer beneficial health effects to human and animals. The use of probiotics to treat gut inflammation is widespread and has been ongoing for decades. Critically, none of the probiotics used for this purpose have been approved by any governmental regulatory body principally because there is no defined mechanism by which they work. This prevents any approval by the FDA.
 
ISU researchers have discovered new biochemical properties in some probiotics that would explain how some of them work to reduce gut inflammation. In addition, they have developed a screening method to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains with the desired biochemical properties. Use of the screening methodology yielded specific strains that are available for licensing.

Advantage:
• New discovery of a microbial endocrinology-based mechanism
• Screening methodology to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains.
• Probiotic strains available for licensing.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4568: Neurotransmitter transport in probiotics

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]]>Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:53:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/259904644Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:58:16 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description: 
ISU researchers have discovered new biochemical properties in some probiotics that would explain how some of them work to reduce gut inflammation. In addition, they have developed a screening method to identify potentially beneficial probiotic strains with the desired biochemical properties. Use of the screening methodology yielded specific strains that are available for licensing.

]]>Advantage:]]>Group:ISURF 4568: Neurotransmitter transport in probiotics

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseNeurotransmitter transport in probioticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24015Summary:
The discovery of the existence of a neurotransmitter transport mechanism in some probiotics is disclosed as well as a method to identify suitable probiotic strains with high potential to modulate neurotransmitter levels in an animal or human host.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Probiotics are designated as living microorganisms that may be used for both maintenance of health as well as treatment of specific clinical conditions ranging from gastrointestinal infections to the treatment of neuropsychiatric-related behavioral issues. Probiotics are also extensively used in the farm production industry (chickens, pigs and cattle) as well as in the treatment of companion animals (dogs, cats, horses).

The inventor (Dr. Lyte) first proposed the creation of the field of microbial endocrinology in 1992 and recent research reports dramatic effects of microbes from the gut on mental function. Dr. Lyte reports in this disclosure that certain probiotic strains possess a neurotransmitter transporter system that would provide a mechanism by which to select probiotics for defined conditions, i.e., tailor the probiotic strain to the treatment. The identification of a neurotransmitter transporter system is reported to be novel. In addition, this disclosure identified an assay that can be used as the first step of a screening process to select potentially beneficial probiotic strains.

Advantage:
• Ability to identify probiotic strains influencing neurotransmitter levels.
• Simple screening method.

Application:
Discovery of beneficial probiotics capable to transport neurotransmitters

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4644: Probiotic treatment of gut inflammation

Patents:

Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 14:10:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240154568Wed, 09 Aug 2017 11:55:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

The inventor (Dr. Lyte) first proposed the creation of the field of microbial endocrinology in 1992 and recent research reports dramatic effects of microbes from the gut on mental function. Dr. Lyte reports in this disclosure that certain probiotic strains possess a neurotransmitter transporter system that would provide a mechanism by which to select probiotics for defined conditions, i.e., tailor the probiotic strain to the treatment. The identification of a neurotransmitter transporter system is reported to be novel. In addition, this disclosure identified an assay that can be used as the first step of a screening process to select potentially beneficial probiotic strains.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 4644: Probiotic treatment of gut inflammation

]]>Patents:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseHaemophilus Influenzae Immunogenhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25665Summary:
A powerful antigenic protein for the development of a vaccine against Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae

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Development Stage:

Description:
Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae (NTHI) is a significant respiratory pathogen associated with millions of yearly middle ear infections in young children and with many cases of pneumonia in the elderly. Currently, there is no efficacious vaccine against Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae. By comparing children prone to ear infections with non-prone children, the ISU contributors discovered that non-prone children differed from prone children by having a strong antibody response against a specific Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae protein. This discovery with its subsequent validation could be the basis for the development of an effective commercial vaccine against the pathogen.

Advantage:
• May enable the first commercial Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae vaccine
• Strong in vivo protection in mice againts many strains
• Highly conserved protein immunogen

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:25:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/256654475Tue, 25 Jul 2017 09:36:35 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseSpinal Muscular Atrophy: A streamlined reporter system to screen for therapeutic compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22400Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a reporter system based on an abbreviated version of the SMN2 gene to screen potential therapeutic compounds involved in the transcription, splicing and translation of SMN2.

Description:
Pre-mRNA splicing is a complex molecular process involving RNA transcription, 5' and 3'-end RNA processing, and multiple RNA processing proteins. Humans have two nearly identical copies of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Skipping of SMN2 exon 7 during pre-mRNA splicing results in a truncated SMN2 transcript which is quickly destroyed inside the cells. In individuals missing a functional SMN1 gene, exon 7 skipping in the SMN2 gene leads to Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Strategies aimed at preventing SMN2 exon 7 skipping have shown promise for the therapy of SMA.
Currently, there is a need for a streamlined reporter system for the facile screening of therapeutic compounds that regulate transcription, splicing, and translation of SMN2. To address this need, ISU researchers constructed a reporter system which is essentially a small version of SMN2 (“Super SMN2 Minigene”). Specifically, the Super SMN2 Minigene system incorporates the SMN2 promoter, a FLAG tag for easy detection, all exons, flanking intronic sequences, and a 3’-untranslated terminal region. The Super SMN2 Minigene system is ideally suited for screening a broad range of compounds that are involved in regulating the transcription, splicing, 3'-end processing, transport and translation of SMN2, and it appears to be the most advanced system available.

Advantage:
• Easy laboratory implementation and less costly
• Ideal for identifying potential drugs for SMA therapy
• Likely to be the most advanced reporter available in the market today.

Application:
SMA Drug Discovery

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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Development Stage:

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]]>Wed, 06 Jul 2016 10:18:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/224004461Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:46:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Currently, there is a need for a streamlined reporter system for the facile screening of therapeutic compounds that regulate transcription, splicing, and translation of SMN2. To address this need, ISU researchers constructed a reporter system which is essentially a small version of SMN2 (“Super SMN2 Minigene”). Specifically, the Super SMN2 Minigene system incorporates the SMN2 promoter, a FLAG tag for easy detection, all exons, flanking intronic sequences, and a 3’-untranslated terminal region. The Super SMN2 Minigene system is ideally suited for screening a broad range of compounds that are involved in regulating the transcription, splicing, 3'-end processing, transport and translation of SMN2, and it appears to be the most advanced system available.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseSplicing Correction in Spinal Muscular Atrophy by Targeting Intronic Sequenceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25525Summary:
This technology has the potential to increase the Spinal Muscular Atrophy protein levels in patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy. The innovation is a blocking antisense oligonucleotide and its target site located in a deep intronic sequence of the SMN2 gene. The blocking of the SMN2 target sequence corrects the defective splicing of the gene.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Humans possess two nearly identical copies of survival motor neuron (SMN) gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 coupled with the inability of SMN2 to compensate for loss of SMN1 causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), one of the leading genetic causes of infant mortality. SMN2 produces a truncated non-functional SMN protein (SMNΔ7) due to skipping of exon 7. It is generally believed that strategies aimed at correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing hold great promise to cure SMA. By constructing and testing a series of overlapping deletions, Iowa State University researchers identified intronic positions 290 to 295 (LDI Site-1 or LS-1) as being involved in a long-distance inhibitory interaction. By carrying out an anti-sense micro walk the researchers observed that anti-sense oligonucleotides targeting LS-1 stimulate SMN2 exon 7 splicing in SMA patient cells. This is the first finding in which anti-sense oligonucleotide blocking of a deep intronic sequence has been found to correct the defective splicing of SMA gene.

Advantage:
• Low cost of synthesis due to small size
• High target specificity and low off-target effect
• Effective at very low dose
• Amenable to modifications for transport across blood brain barrier
• Unique mechanism of splicing regulation through modulation of catalytic core of spliceosome

Application:
Development of drugs for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

References:
1. Singh, N. N., Lawler, M. N., Ottesen, E. W., Upreti, D., Kaczynski, J. R., & Singh, R. N. (2013). An intronic structure enabled by a long-distance interaction serves as a novel target for splicing correction in spinal muscular atrophy. Nucleic Acids Research, 41(17), 8144–8165.

2. Deep Intronic Target For Splicing Correction On Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene, US patent application number 20150315582

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:56:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/255254087Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:59:16 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:

]]>References:Singh, N. N., Lawler, M. N., Ottesen, E. W., Upreti, D., Kaczynski, J. R., & Singh, R. N. (2013). An intronic structure enabled by a long-distance interaction serves as a novel target for splicing correction in spinal muscular atrophy. Nucleic Acids Research, 41(17), 8144–8165.

2. Deep Intronic Target For Splicing Correction On Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene, US patent application number 20150315582]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseNovel exosome-based oligomeric alpha-synuclein protien biomarker discovery using the RT-QuIC assay platformhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25425Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an assay for following the progression of parkinsonain disorders.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative disorder affecting around 2% of the elder population in U.S, and its incidence is expected to rise dramatically with the advancing median age of the population. There are no current diagnostic tests or biomarker(s) to follow its progression. Current diagnosis and followup are mainly based on a thorough clinical history and neurological evaluation. ISURF #04583 is a method of use for RT-QuIC assay with remarkable accuracy targeting specifically Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorders. Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated this technique to be rapid, sensitive, specific, and quantitative. The method is flexible, able to adopt to a variety of easily accessible samples including, but not limited to, body fluids like blood and urine. Thus far the researchers have demonstrated capability of detecting Mn poising (strongly linked to PD) in welders, a common occupational hazard.

Advantage:
• Fast
• Effective
• Selective

Application:
Identification and quantified tracking of Parkinson's disease and the family of Parkinsonian disorders.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/254254583Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:15 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:Identification and quantified tracking of Parkinson's disease and the family of Parkinsonian disorders.Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduHealthcare| Life Sciences| Medical DevicesFalseNovel anthelmintic drugshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25369Summary:
This invention includes two new anthelmintic compounds. The compounds are (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine and (S)-5-bromoanabasine. These compounds are both derivatives of the nicotine molecule and are agonists of a nicotinic ACh receptor. This invention may take advantage of the large market for animal parasiticides and the lack of existing patented drugs for deworming.

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Development Stage:
The current status of the invention is at the proof of concept stage.

Description:
Nematode parasites infect ~2 billion people world-wide and infections are treated and prevented by anthelmintic drugs, some of which act on nicotinic Acetyl Choline receptors (nAChRs). There is an unmet need for novel therapeutic agents because of concerns about the development of resistance. ISU researchers selected the Asu-ACR-16 receptor from a significant nematode parasite, Ascaris, as a pharmaceutical target and nicotine as the basic moiety to facilitate the development of a novel class of anthelmintics. Asu-ACR-16 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology and determined agonist concentration-current-response plots to estimate the potencies (EC50s) of the agonists. The researchers synthesized a novel agonist, (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine, and show that it is more potent than other nicotine alkaloids on Asu-ACR-16. Other related (S)-5-ethynyl-anabasine derivatives have also been developed. Such agonists have the potential to circumvent drug resistance that has arisen following repeated treatment of nematode parasites with other classes of anthelmintic drugs and are a useful lead for anthelmintic drug development.

Advantage:
• Target nicotinic ACh receptor
• Based on easily derived chemical
• Can replace drugs to which resistance has been developed
• Potentially useful in both human and animal populations

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253694541Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:04:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:The current status of the invention is at the proof of concept stage.Description:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseMethod of Controlled Drug Release from Nano-Patterned Polymer Stents Applicable to Cardiac Therapieshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22742Summary:
ISU researchers developed a novel method to create nano-patterned stents that allow for a dramatic increase in drug release duration.

Description:
Two major problems of stents are i) thrombosis or clotting of platelets and ii) restenosis - a narrowing of the artery after stent use. A common strategy to relieve thrombosis and restenosis is to utilize drug eluting stents, which are coated with anti-clotting medication. The drug is slowly released into the bloodstream. The medication relieves rejection of the implanted stents. ISU researchers have developed a novel method to control the release of medication from such drug eluting stents utilizing bio-degradable stent materials such as polymer poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which is a candidate for polymer stents. A method to create nanoscale patterning (with sub micrometer pitch) on bio-compatible polymers using a robust transfer molding approach was developed. The release of the immunosuppressant drug (sirolimus or rapamycin) from patterned and unpatterned (flat) polymer surfaces was measured. Significantly slower release rates (10-30%) were observed from nano-patterned surfaces than from flat surfaces.

Advantage:
• Up to 30% slower release
• Robust / Highly reproducible
• Can deliver numerous medications
• May have broader uses beyond stents

Application:
Cardiac Therapies

References:
Nanoscale patterning of biopolymers for functional biosurfaces and controlled drug release, Akshit Peer, Rabin Dhakal, Rana Biswas, and Jaeyoun Kim, Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 18654-18664, DOI: 10.1039/C6NR05197A

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:18:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/227424494Thu, 16 Mar 2017 14:04:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Nanoscale patterning of biopolymers for functional biosurfaces and controlled drug release, Akshit Peer, Rabin Dhakal, Rana Biswas, and Jaeyoun Kim, Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 18654-18664, DOI: 10.1039/C6NR05197A

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Medical DevicesFalseSaracatinib (AZD0503) is a epilepsy treatment drug candidatehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24014Summary:
Previous studies of the AZD0503/Saracatinib drug, a well-known fyn kinase inhibitor, have demonstrated excellent tolerability and bioavailability in humans. ISU researchers have discovered that the drug reduces seizure onset in the mouse kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Thus, the drug has potential for the treatment of epilepsy in humans.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Chemoconvulsant-induced status epilepticus in rodents can lead to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE).  ISU researchers unexpectedly found that the fyn kinase, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, is up-regulated in microglial cells in a mouse kainate (KA) model of TLE. The researchers hypothesized that reducing the levels of fyn kinase would prevent seizure onset, decrease the severity of SE, and the brain pathology associated with epileptogenesis.

The fyn kinase hypothesis was tested in the fyn knockout mice (fyn -/-) with appropriate fyn+ /+ controls with saracatinib (25 mg/kg, oral, single dose) 4h prior to the induction of SE with KA (5mg/kg, i.p. at 30 min intervals or as a single high dose of 25 mg/kg). Two hours after SE establishment,  the behavioral SE was terminated, the animals euthanized, and the brain, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid were collected for various analyses. Brain tissues were processed for Immunohistochemistry and western blot  analysis. The time-dependent activation of fyn in microglial cells and initiation of neuro-inflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms in the hippocampus at 4h, 24h and 7day time points post-SE were also examined, and a electroencephalographic (EEG) analysis to determine the spike rate and SRS frequency was performed. 

The behavioral studies revealed a significant reduction in the severity of the seizures and the time spent in convulsive motor seizures (CMS) stages in the fyn-/- mice and saracatinib treated mice during the 2h established SE. The mortality rate in the fyn-/- mice was lower than the fyn+/+ mice. The number of spontaneous electrographic non-convulsive seizures, the duration of CMS, and the spike frequency were also reduced in the fyn-/- mice. The epileptiform spike rate was higher in fyn+/+ mice during the first 7 days, but they decreased thereafter. IHC analysis of brain sections revealed a significant increase in fyn, PKC-δ, oxidative and nitrative stress markers (GP-91phox, 4-HNE, 3NT)  in the microglia in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 at 4h and 24h post-SE in fyn+/+ mice. These levels were significantly reduced in the fyn-/- mice. Also, a significant increase in the fyn and PKC-δ nuclear translocation in reactive microglia at 24h post SE was detected in the fyn+/+ mice  vs. the fyn-/- mice, suggesting their role in the pro-inflammatory responses. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS mRNA levels in controls when compared with the fyn-/-mice. In the 24h group, hippocampal western blots revealed down-regulation of fyn, PKC-δ, phospho Src-416, phospho PKCδ-507, GP-91phox, 4-HNE and caspase-3 levels in fyn-/-mice vs. fyn+/+mice. Moreover, an increase in the numbers of FJB-positive neurons was observed in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus at 24h post-SE in fyn+/+ mice vs. fyn-/- mice.

Advantage:
• Repurposed experimental cancer drug
• Drug has excellent tolerability and bioavailability in humans
• Potential to treat epilepsy with fyn kinase inhibitors
• Ongoing clinical trials for non-epilepsy indications

Application:
Treatment of epilepsy using Saracatinib or another fyn kinase inhibitor.

References:
Fyn kinase increases seizure susceptibility by regulating neuro-inflammatory response in reactive microglia in the hippocampus in a mouse kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:51:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240144550Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:59:16 GMTSummary:

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The fyn kinase hypothesis was tested in the fyn knockout mice (fyn -/-) with appropriate fyn+ /+ controls with saracatinib (25 mg/kg, oral, single dose) 4h prior to the induction of SE with KA (5mg/kg, i.p. at 30 min intervals or as a single high dose of 25 mg/kg). Two hours after SE establishment,  the behavioral SE was terminated, the animals euthanized, and the brain, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid were collected for various analyses. Brain tissues were processed for Immunohistochemistry and western blot  analysis. The time-dependent activation of fyn in microglial cells and initiation of neuro-inflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms in the hippocampus at 4h, 24h and 7day time points post-SE were also examined, and a electroencephalographic (EEG) analysis to determine the spike rate and SRS frequency was performed. 

The behavioral studies revealed a significant reduction in the severity of the seizures and the time spent in convulsive motor seizures (CMS) stages in the fyn-/- mice and saracatinib treated mice during the 2h established SE. The mortality rate in the fyn-/- mice was lower than the fyn+/+ mice. The number of spontaneous electrographic non-convulsive seizures, the duration of CMS, and the spike frequency were also reduced in the fyn-/- mice. The epileptiform spike rate was higher in fyn+/+ mice during the first 7 days, but they decreased thereafter. IHC analysis of brain sections revealed a significant increase in fyn, PKC-δ, oxidative and nitrative stress markers (GP-91phox, 4-HNE, 3NT)  in the microglia in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 at 4h and 24h post-SE in fyn+/+ mice. These levels were significantly reduced in the fyn-/- mice. Also, a significant increase in the fyn and PKC-δ nuclear translocation in reactive microglia at 24h post SE was detected in the fyn+/+ mice  vs. the fyn-/- mice, suggesting their role in the pro-inflammatory responses. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS mRNA levels in controls when compared with the fyn-/-mice. In the 24h group, hippocampal western blots revealed down-regulation of fyn, PKC-δ, phospho Src-416, phospho PKCδ-507, GP-91phox, 4-HNE and caspase-3 levels in fyn-/-mice vs. fyn+/+mice. Moreover, an increase in the numbers of FJB-positive neurons was observed in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus at 24h post-SE in fyn+/+ mice vs. fyn-/- mice.

]]>Advantage:

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]]>References:Fyn kinase increases seizure susceptibility by regulating neuro-inflammatory response in reactive microglia in the hippocampus in a mouse kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseMitoapocynin: A potential antiepileptogenic agenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22824Summary:
ISU researchers have synthesized an orally available derivative of apocynin, Mitoapocynin (Mito-Apo) for the treatment of seizures.

Description:
A seizure is a sudden alteration in normal brain activity that results in distinct changes in behavior or body function, which can be caused by stroke, brain tumors, metabolic disturbances, and others. It has been reported that mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation could contribute to the occurrence of seizures. However, currently there is a lack of a pharmacological agent that can intervene in all key pathological mechanisms. To overcome this problem, Researchers at ISU have synthesized an orally available derivative of apocynin, Mitoapocynin (Mito-Apo), which was previously tested to target mitochondria and protect against oxidative damage, glial-mediated inflammation and nigrostrital neurodegeneration in the animal model of PD. In the current animal model, Mito-apo showed excellent central nervous system (CNS) bioavailability even at a very low dose (3mg/kg, oral). At I0 mg/kg (oral, as a single dose), it attenuated the severity and duration of convulsive seizures, and increased the latency to the onset of convulsive seizures as well as protected against seizure induced mortality.

Advantage:
• Easy to be synthesized in the laboratory
• Available in oral dosage form
• Enhanced cellular and mitochondrial uptake, and effective at a low dosage

Application:
seizures drug discovery

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 09 Sep 2016 12:13:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/228244467Thu, 10 Nov 2016 14:29:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:A seizure is a sudden alteration in normal brain activity that results in distinct changes in behavior or body function, which can be caused by stroke, brain tumors, metabolic disturbances, and others. It has been reported that mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation could contribute to the occurrence of seizures. However, currently there is a lack of a pharmacological agent that can intervene in all key pathological mechanisms. To overcome this problem, Researchers at ISU have synthesized an orally available derivative of apocynin, Mitoapocynin (Mito-Apo), which was previously tested to target mitochondria and protect against oxidative damage, glial-mediated inflammation and nigrostrital neurodegeneration in the animal model of PD. In the current animal model, Mito-apo showed excellent central nervous system (CNS) bioavailability even at a very low dose (3mg/kg, oral). At I0 mg/kg (oral, as a single dose), it attenuated the severity and duration of convulsive seizures, and increased the latency to the onset of convulsive seizures as well as protected against seizure induced mortality.Advantage:Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseSaracatinib, an anti-inflammatory effect of orally active Fyn kinase inhibitor against Parkinson's diseasehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22740Summary:
ISU researchers have discovered a pharmacological inhibitor of Fyn kinase, Saracatinib, to block the microglial activation and neuroinflammation in Parkinson’s disease.

Description:
Parkinson’s disease (PD), a chronic and progressive movement disorder, remains the second most common neurodegenerative disease with a substantial socioeconomic burden in ageing populations. Primary motor signs of PD include tremors, slowness of movement, rigidity and postural instability. Current treatments primarily tend to control symptoms of PD with no effective ways to slow or halt disease progression. To address this problem, researchers at ISU recently identified that Fyn-PKCδ signaling pathway drives microglial activation and neuroinflammation to promote disease progression in cell culture and animal models of PD. It is the first report ever to demonstrate that Fyn tyrosine kinase is a key drug target for PD and other related neurodegenerative diseases. Based on this discovery, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Saracatinib (AZD-0530) was found to effectively block Fyn-PKCδ signaling pathway to suppress microglial activation and neuroinflammatory cascade in PD models.

Advantage:
• First discovery found to block PD disease progression by targeting Fyn kinase
• Anti-inflammatory effect in PD cell culture and animal models

Application:
Pharmaceutical development for Parkinson’s disease

References:
Fyn Kinase Regulates Microglial Neuroinflammatory Responses in Cell Culture and Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease. Panicker, N., et al., 2015. J. Neurosci. 35, 10058-10077

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:48:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/227404431Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:51:52 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Fyn Kinase Regulates Microglial Neuroinflammatory Responses in Cell Culture and Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease. Panicker, N., et al., 2015. J. Neurosci. 35, 10058-10077]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseMicroscale Tentacle Actuatorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21029Description:
ISU researchers have invented a soft material-based manipulator for delicate, fragile microscale objects. It is based on a thin-walled elastomeric microtube with an asymmetric wall thickness distribution and one end closed. Upon applying air pressure from the open end, the microtube becomes elongated non-uniformly, bending towards the thick-walled side. This type of bending, however, is often insufficient to induce a spiraling which mimics the coiling motion of biological tentacles, such as those of the octopus. To amplify the bending into multi-turn spiraling, we installed a small extra thickness (i.e., hump) to the exterior of the microtube. When the size and position of the hump were adequate, the microtube could accomplish multi-tum spiraling which is ideal for winding around small objects and scoop them up. This type of conformal spiraling motion is non-destructive since it does not involve squeezing and will be useful for safe handling of cell aggregates, eggs, or biological tissues that are highly fragile.

Advantage:
• Can handle soft, fragile micro-objects that is not offered today
• Capable of grabbing objects as small as ~ 185 µM with a grabbing force of ~ 0.78 mN
• Unique fabrication techniques of the thin, highly deformable microtubes

Application:
Biological microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS)

References:
Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210294387Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:15:31 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTriple Halo Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Coilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21028Description:
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, safe method for the treatment of neurologic disorders such as depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Parkinson's disease. Currently, TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of depression.  The existing commercial TMS coils can only stimulate the cortical regions of the brain. For the success of the treatment of other neurological disorders, there is a need for the development of TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain. Development of deep brain stimulation coils is challenging as the magnetic field decays rapidly with the distance from the source (coil surface). Magnetic fields with sufficient magnitude to stimulate the deeper regions of the brain should not stimulate the scalp of the patients. ISU researchers have developed a novel coil design based on our earlier "Halo Coil" configuration. This design of the new coil called the "Triple Halo Coil" will be able to stimulate deeper regions of the brain.

Advantage:
• The first of its kind that could potentially be used for the treatment of deep brain disorders non-invasively, safely and in an out-patient setting
• Capable of stimulating deeper regions of the brain with more than 10 times the magnetic field for the same amount of surface field at a depth of 10 cm
• Coils have been configured such that they do not overstimulate any part of the brain surface
• Electric and magnetic fields were calculated in heterogeneous head models

Application:
Health care. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210284376Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:20:32 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSMN2 Catalytic Core: A Novel Approach for Spinal Muscular Atrophy Treatmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19204Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified a new approach for the development of treatments for spinal muscular atrophy using an antisense oligonucleotide.

Description:
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the control of muscle movement and is a leading genetic cause of infant mortality.  SMA is divided into four subtypes based on disease severity and the age at which it manifests. In humans, there are two nearly identical copies of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) gene, SMN1 and SMN2.  Loss of SMN1 in conjunction with skipping of SMN2 exon 7 in pre-mRNA splicing—which results in a truncated, unstable SMN—leads to SMA.  Strategies to correct the splicing aberration in SMN2 are believed to hold promise for a cure for SMA, and have included screening many small compounds as well as the use of short antisense oligonucleotides (ASO).  To date, however, no small compounds or ASO have been identified that can correct the SMN2 splicing defect.  As part of an ongoing research program in SMA, ISU researchers have now identified a novel short antisense oligonucleotide that corrects the aberrant splicing in SMN2.  This ASO may have utility as a potential treatment for SMA since it offers low cost synthesis, high target specificity, ease of manipulation and potential to cross the blood brain barrier.

Advantage:
• Low cost of synthesis due to small size
• High target specificity and low off-target effect
• Effective at very low dose
• Amenable to modifications for transport across blood brain barrier
• Unique mechanism of splicing regulation through modulation of catalytic core of spliceosome

Application:
Development of drugs for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

References:
1: A short antisense oligonucleotide masking a unique intronic motif prevents skipping of a critical exon in spinal muscular atrophy. Singh N.N., Shishimorova M., Cao L.C., Gangwani L., Singh R.N. 2009.  RNA Biol. 6:341-50.

2: Antisense microwalk reveals critical role of an intronic position linked to a unique long-distance interaction in pre-mRNA splicing”, Singh, N.N., Hollinger K., Bhattacharya, D. and Singh, R.N. 2010. RNA 16:1167-1181.

3: Alternative splicing in spinal muscular atrophy underscores the role of an intron definition model. Singh N.N., Singh R.N. 2011. RNA Biol. 8(4). Epub ahead of print June 9, 2011.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192043810Wed, 23 Dec 2015 14:02:20 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) gene, SMN1 and SMN2.  Loss of SMN1 in conjunction with skipping of SMN2 exon 7 in pre-mRNA splicing—which results in a truncated, unstable SMN—leads to SMA.  Strategies to correct the splicing aberration in SMN2 are believed to hold promise for a cure for SMA, and have included screening many small compounds as well as the use of short antisense oligonucleotides (ASO).  To date, however, no small compounds or ASO have been identified that can correct the SMN2 splicing defect.  As part of an ongoing research program in SMA, ISU researchers have now identified a novel short antisense oligonucleotide that corrects the aberrant splicing in SMN2.  This ASO may have utility as a potential treatment for SMA since it offers low cost synthesis, high target specificity, ease of manipulation and potential to cross the blood brain barrier.

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: A short antisense oligonucleotide masking a unique intronic motif prevents skipping of a critical exon in spinal muscular atrophy. Singh N.N., Shishimorova M., Cao L.C., Gangwani L., Singh R.N. 2009.  RNA Biol. 6:341-50.

2: Antisense microwalk reveals critical role of an intronic position linked to a unique long-distance interaction in pre-mRNA splicing”, Singh, N.N., Hollinger K., Bhattacharya, D. and Singh, R.N. 2010. RNA 16:1167-1181.

3: Alternative splicing in spinal muscular atrophy underscores the role of an intron definition model. Singh N.N., Singh R.N. 2011. RNA Biol. 8(4). Epub ahead of print June 9, 2011.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesSpinal Muscular Atrophy Treatment via Targeting SMN2 Catalytic CoreUtilityUnited States8,802,64213/093,9584/26/20118/12/20147/17/20315/5/20158/25/2017Spinal Muscular Atrophy Treatment via Targeting SMN2 Catalytic CoreContinuationUnited States9,217,14714/134,05712/19/201312/22/20154/30/203112/23/20159/8/2017FalseMultimodal applications for mesoporous silica nanoparticles in contrast imaginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21064Description:
A novel multimodal nanomaterial contrast agent with unique capability for in vivo and in biomedical imaging has been developed. The particle is designed to elicit a significant signal compared to organs, tissues and cells examined with CT, MRI Echo as well Fluorescence Microscopy. This invention is the “Swiss Army knife” approach to contrast imaging techniques. The particle is based on a backbone of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN), a 200 nm diameter particle with 3-5 nm pores that can be loaded with a drug or reagent of interest. The surface of MSN and/or the silica framework is covalently functionalized with one or more of the following materials: gadolinium oxide, gold, -CF3 functional groups, and/or a fluorophore such as FITC or Texas Red. These materials can then be detected with one or more of the following imaging modalities: magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging, or fluorescence microscopy. The particles have the propensity to bind and gain entry into a variety of cells through nonspecific (engulfed) or specific (extracellular binding molecules) labeling methods. The particle can also selectively bind cells using receptor ligands, which make this useful to biomedical research as well as drug delivery. The particle’s versatility makes it a potentially powerful tool for both clinical and research purposes.

Advantage:
• Effective in vivo
• Inert material that is biocompatible

Application:
Biomedical imaging, biomedical research, drug delivery

References:
U.S. Patent Application 2015/0125398

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210644023Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:16 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:U.S. Patent Application 2015/0125398]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Imaging| Life SciencesFalseNeuroprotection by Mitochondria-targeted Metforminhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21048Description:
Metformin, a naturally-occurring biguanide, is an FDA-approved high-safety profile diabetes drug that has been used extensively for decades. Researchers at Iowa State University and Medical College of Wisconsin synthesized Mito-Met, a mitochondria-targeted analog of metformin and then evaluated the preclinical efficacy of Mito-Met in cell culture and MitoPark animal models of Parkinson’s disease. It was demonstrated that Mito-Met improved motor deficits in MitoPark mice and that it was a neuroprotective agent that exceedingly qualifies for in-depth preclinical efficacy and toxicology evaluations for treating mitochondrial diseases including Parkinson’s disease.

Advantage:
• Increases the survival of dopaminergic neurons in cell culture and in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease
• Based on FDA-approved low-toxicity drug
• Chemical modifications increased its affinity to the intended mitochondrial target
• Addresses a high value market
• Effective at very low doses

Application:
Human Therapeutics, Treatment of Parkinson’s disease

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:13:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210484417Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:13:58 GMTDescription:

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]]>Application:

]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesFalseDroplet Actuator and Methods of Droplet Manipulationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21034Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a portable system to perform droplet operations such as transport, mixing, merging, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets. The system uses two electrical motors to tilt a planar platform at pre-specified angles, thereby allowing multiple droplets to move in pre-decided patterns.

Description:
The invention is a portable system to perform droplet manipulations such as transport, mixing, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets.  The novelty is in the methods of moving droplets using gravitational force and mechanical jerks.  The design of hydrophilic patterns, along with the gravitational and mechanical tilting of the platform, help move the droplets.  The utility of this invention is the ease of use and low-cost compared to the existing technology being used today.  This system can help automate a diverse range of applications in molecular diagnostics of physiological samples.

Advantage:
• Portable, cost efficient design compared to currently available automated liquid handling systems
• Uses mechanical jerks and gravity to move droplets vs. current systems which use high electrical voltages, laser beams or vibrations from sound generating devices
• Utilizes unique techniques of printing patterns of specific shapes and sizes on a low-cost transparency film that has been treated to provide hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas

Application:
Immunology, protein chemistry, biomarker identification and molecular diagnosis of physiological samples

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210344313Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:08 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

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]]>Application:

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]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMouse Monoclonal Anti Clostridium Perfringens Type D epsilon Toxin Antibody (Clone# 4D6)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19981Summary:
The 4D6 monoclonal antibody can detect nanogram quantities by Western blotting of both the Clostridium perfringens epsilon proto-toxin as well as the activated toxin

Description:
The epsilon toxin is one of 12 protein toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens, a Gram positive, anaerobic spore-forming rod. There are five strains of C. perfringens, designated A through E. Each strain produces a unique spectrum of toxins. The epsilon toxin is made by types B and D. This toxin is a pore-forming protein; it causes potassium and fluid leakage from cells. In addition to the epsilon toxin, Clostridium perfringens type D strains produce alpha toxin and type B strains produce alpha and beta toxins. C. perfringens type B causes severe enteritis in young calves, foals, lambs and piglets. Type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and, on rare occasions, in cattle. All five strains can infect wounds in any species.
The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

Advantage:
• Probably the only D epsilon toxin monoclonal antibody available commercially
• Can detect as little as 625pgs of recombinant  epsilon mutant toxoid.
• Easy detection with anti-mouse-IgG-HRP

Application:
Detection of the Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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]]>Mon, 20 Jul 2015 14:29:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/199814281Mon, 20 Jul 2015 14:30:24 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseSingle Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microsphereshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19380Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed controlled release vaccine formulations that may have utility for inducing certain types of immune responses

Description:
Successful vaccination often requires multiple immunization shots or boosters to offer complete protection.  In addition, generation of the appropriate type of immune response is also critical for developing immunity, and may be dependent on the type of adjuvant used in the vaccine preparation.  ISU researchers have developed a single-dose, controlled release vaccine formulation based on polyanhydride microspheres.  The microspheres can be loaded with antigenic proteins for immunization, and the microsphere composition controls the release of the antigen.  The need for alum-based adjuvants that tend to induce Th2 immunity is obviated. Additionally, preferential Th1 versus Th2 immune responses can be induced based on how the microspheres are loaded with antigen.  This type of vaccination strategy may improve protection against intracellular pathogens, and be especially useful for the development of vaccines against certain cancers and viruses.  These single dose controlled release vaccine formulations have the potential to simplify vaccination schedules and facilitate mass immunization campaigns. 

Advantage:
• Single-dose vaccine formulation that can be modulated to induce Th1 versus Th2 cellular immunity.
• Reduces the need for adjuvants and may improve safety.
• May replace multiple injections required for some conventional vaccines, resulting in greater compliance with recommended immunization schedules

Application:
Production of single-dose vaccines for certain cancers, viruses and intracellular pathogens; especially useful for the induction of Th1 immune response.

References:
1: “Encapsulation, stabilization, and release of BSA-FITC from polyanhydride microspheres”, Amy S. Determan, Brian G. Trewyn, Victor S.-Y. Lin, Marit Nilsen-Hamilton, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, J. Controlled Release 100:97-109.

2: “Single dose vaccine based on biodegradable polyanhydride microspheres can modulate immune response mechanism”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer H. Wilson, Michael J. Wannemuehler , Balaji Narasimhan, 2006, J. Biomed. Materials. Res. 76:798-810.

3: “Single-dose vaccine carrier for modulation of immune response mechanisms”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer Wilson, Michael Wannemuehler, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, AIChE Annual Meeting, Austin, TX.

This technology is related to ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3729: A Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogens

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Induction of Th1 immunity has been demonstrated following intramuscular injection using the vaccine formulation loaded with tetanus toxoid.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193803176Mon, 20 Jul 2015 13:15:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed a single-dose, controlled release vaccine formulation based on polyanhydride microspheres.  The microspheres can be loaded with antigenic proteins for immunization, and the microsphere composition controls the release of the antigen.  The need for alum-based adjuvants that tend to induce Th2 immunity is obviated. Additionally, preferential Th1 versus Th2 immune responses can be induced based on how the microspheres are loaded with antigen.  This type of vaccination strategy may improve protection against intracellular pathogens, and be especially useful for the development of vaccines against certain cancers and viruses.  These single dose controlled release vaccine formulations have the potential to simplify vaccination schedules and facilitate mass immunization campaigns. 

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Encapsulation, stabilization, and release of BSA-FITC from polyanhydride microspheres”, Amy S. Determan, Brian G. Trewyn, Victor S.-Y. Lin, Marit Nilsen-Hamilton, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, J. Controlled Release 100:97-109.

2: “Single dose vaccine based on biodegradable polyanhydride microspheres can modulate immune response mechanism”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer H. Wilson, Michael J. Wannemuehler , Balaji Narasimhan, 2006, J. Biomed. Materials. Res. 76:798-810.

3: “Single-dose vaccine carrier for modulation of immune response mechanisms”, Matt J. Kipper, Jennifer Wilson, Michael Wannemuehler, and Balaji Narasimhan, 2004, AIChE Annual Meeting, Austin, TX.

]]>ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3729: A Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogens

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineControlled-Release Immunogenic Formulations to Modulate Immune ResponseUtilityUnited States7,858,09311/262,31010/28/200512/28/201010/28/20255/13/201511/10/2016Controlled-Release Immunogenic Formulations to Modulate Immune ResponseContinuationUnited States8,173,10412/554,2829/4/20095/8/20126/9/20255/13/201511/10/2016FalseA Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogenshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19374Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved method for delivering antibiotics inside infected cells for more effective treatment.

Description:
Bioerodible polymers have been researched for potential biomedical applications like drug or vaccine delivery for a number of years.  For example, polyesters such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been FDA approved for some applications; however, their suitability for others, such as vaccine delivery, is limited by factors that affect the stability of protein immunogens, such as producing a low pH milieu or inducing protein aggregation as well as acidic compartmentalization that is detrimental to the effectiveness of most antibiotics. In contrast, polyanhydrides have a number of potential advantages for biomedical applications, including chemistry-dependent surface erosion and payload release, a moderate pH microenvironment, and better protein stabilization; polyanhydrides have been used for delivery of plasmid DNA, small molecular weight compounds, and vaccine components.  In addition, polyanhdride microspheres and nanospheres (PAparticles) elicit unique cellular responses from immune cells that stimulate internalization, direct intracellular trafficking and degrade slowly within the cells.  Varying the chemistry of the particle affects particle degradation and alters the fate of the particle within cells. This characteristic can be exploited to target intracellular pathogens which evade host defenses by adapting themselves to the environment within cells and escape killing by antibiotics.  ISU researchers have now developed PAparticles with modified surface chemistries that are capable of entering host cells and delivering antibiotics in the same microenvironment as that of an intracellular pathogen.  Loading of the antibiotics onto the PAparticles does not chemically modify the antibiotics or negate their antimicrobial function. This highly effective targeting of the intracellular environment has to potential to reduce the amount of antibiotic needed to treat such an infection and also provide delayed release, thus improving the bioavailablity of the drug.

Advantage:
• Enhanced uptake compared to PLGA particles
• Targets more favorable intracellular compartments
• Potential for longer bioavailability of encapsulated antibiotics
• Provides greater encapsulation of hydrophobic antibiotics compared to PLGA particles

Application:
Drug delivery

References:
1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

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Development Stage:
Co-localization of the polyanhydride particles with the intracellular pathogen M. paratuberculosis in tissue culture cells has been demonstrated, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193743729Mon, 20 Jul 2015 13:15:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

]]>Group:ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAntimicrobial Compositions and MethodsUtilityUnited States8,449,91612/940,87211/5/20105/28/20134/10/20315/13/20152/27/2017Antimicrobial Polyanhydride NanoparticlesContinuationUnited States8,927,02413/866,5204/19/20131/6/201511/5/20305/13/20152/27/2017FalseParkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19199Description:
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects over six million people worldwide.  Its most prominent symptoms, which result from the death of dopamine-producing cells, are related to movement, and include tremors, difficulty with walking, rigidity, and slow movement.  Current treatments tend to merely control symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, while future therapeutic goals include the development of neuroprotective agents that slow disease progression or may even result in curing it.
ISU researchers have developed a portfolio of technologies with potential as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of PD and as targets for the development of novel therapies.  This technology suite includes ISURF #s 3172, 3411, and 3728.   ISURF #3172 is an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  ISURF #3411 describes effects of a PKCδ inhibitor which increases dopamine synthesis and confers neuroprotective effects in PD animal models.  ISURF #3728 includes the design and synthesis of analogs of the inhibitor with simpler structures and increased activity that have been demonstrated to confer neuroprotection in cell culture models of PD.

Advantage:
• Neuroprotective in PD cell culture and animal models

Application:
Pharmaceutical development

References:
1: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

2: “Protein Kinase Cδ Negatively Regulates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity and Dopamine Synthesis by Enhancing Protein Phosphatase-2A Activity in Dopaminergic Neurons”, D. Zhang, A. Kanthasamy, Y. Yang, V. Anantharam, and A. Kanthasamy, 2007, J. Neurosci. 27:5349-5362.

3: “Novel cell death signaling pathways in neurotoxicity models of dopaminergic degeneration: Relevance to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease”, A. Kanthasamy, H. Jin, S. Mehrotra, R. Mishra, A. Kanthasamy, and A. Rana. 2010. NeuroToxicology 31:555-561.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3172: PKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosis and

ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:03 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191993728Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:12 GMTDescription:
ISU researchers have developed a portfolio of technologies with potential as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of PD and as targets for the development of novel therapies.  This technology suite includes ISURF #s 3172, 3411, and 3728.   ISURF #3172 is an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  ISURF #3411 describes effects of a PKCδ inhibitor which increases dopamine synthesis and confers neuroprotective effects in PD animal models.  ISURF #3728 includes the design and synthesis of analogs of the inhibitor with simpler structures and increased activity that have been demonstrated to confer neuroprotection in cell culture models of PD.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

2: “Protein Kinase Cδ Negatively Regulates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity and Dopamine Synthesis by Enhancing Protein Phosphatase-2A Activity in Dopaminergic Neurons”, D. Zhang, A. Kanthasamy, Y. Yang, V. Anantharam, and A. Kanthasamy, 2007, J. Neurosci. 27:5349-5362.

3: “Novel cell death signaling pathways in neurotoxicity models of dopaminergic degeneration: Relevance to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease”, A. Kanthasamy, H. Jin, S. Mehrotra, R. Mishra, A. Kanthasamy, and A. Rana. 2010. NeuroToxicology 31:555-561.

]]>Group:ISURF #3172: PKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosis and

ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesDesign, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin AnalogsUtilityUnited States8,586,76812/945,18011/12/201011/19/20132/9/20325/7/20157/19/2017FalsePKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosishttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19201Summary:
A researcher has developed a peptide inhibitor for the protein kinase C delta cleavage site that has utility as a research reagent and for the measurement of caspase-3 activity.

Description:
Oxidative stress and apoptosis are considered important common mediators of many diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.  Caspase-3 has been shown to activate protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) through proteolytic cleavage, leading to PKCδ-mediated apoptosis of cultured neuronal cells. Researchers at ISU have developed an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the PKCδ cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  Because of its efficacy, this inhibitor may have utility as a reagent for investigating apoptosis as well as for measuring caspase-3 activity through competitive inhibition assays.  This technology is available for licensing in the areas of research reagents and apoptosis diagnostics.

Advantage:
• The peptide inhibitor is much more potent than other known caspase-3 inhibitors
• Relatively selective
• Demonstrated to be effective as an experimental neuroprotective agent.

Application:
Research (experimental reagent for apoptosis and oxidative cell stress research) and Diagnostic (measurement of caspase-3 activity)

References:
1: “A novel PKC delta (PKCδ) inhibitor protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in neurodegenerative disease models”, Anumantha G. Kanthasamy, Claivarathan Latchoumycandane, Siddharth Kaul, Vellareddy Anantharam and Arti Kanthasamy.  Presented at the Experimental Biology (April 2-6, 2005) and the XXXV International Congress on Physiological Sciences, (March 31-April 5, 2005), San Diego, CA.

2: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
With an IC50 of 6 µM, the peptide inhibitor has been demonstrated to be three-fold more potent than the classical used caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192013172Mon, 01 Jun 2015 07:48:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “A novel PKC delta (PKCδ) inhibitor protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in neurodegenerative disease models”, Anumantha G. Kanthasamy, Claivarathan Latchoumycandane, Siddharth Kaul, Vellareddy Anantharam and Arti Kanthasamy.  Presented at the Experimental Biology (April 2-6, 2005) and the XXXV International Congress on Physiological Sciences, (March 31-April 5, 2005), San Diego, CA.

2: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

]]>Group:ISURF #3411: Parkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineMethods and Compositions for Inhibiting PKC Delta Cleavage for Treatment and Prevention of Neurodegeneration and ApoptosisUtilityUnited States7,632,81911/262,67710/31/200512/15/200910/25/20275/7/20158/15/2017FalseParkinson’s Disease - Dual Beneficial Effect of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19200Description:
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects over six million people worldwide.  Its most prominent symptoms, which result from the death of dopamine-producing cells, are related to movement, and include tremors, difficulty with walking, rigidity, and slow movement.  Current treatments tend to merely control symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, while future therapeutic goals include the development of neuroprotective agents that slow disease progression or may even result in curing it.
ISU researchers have developed a portfolio of technologies with potential as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of PD and as targets for the development of novel therapies.  This technology suite includes ISURF #s 3172, 3411, and 3728.   ISURF #3172 is an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  ISURF #3411 describes effects of a PKCδ inhibitor which increases dopamine synthesis and confers neuroprotective effects in PD animal models.  ISURF #3728 includes the design and synthesis of analogs of the inhibitor with simpler structures and increased activity that have been demonstrated to confer neuroprotection in cell culture models of PD.

Advantage:
• Neuroprotective in PD cell culture and animal models

Application:
Pharmaceutical development

References:
1: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

2: “Protein Kinase Cδ Negatively Regulates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity and Dopamine Synthesis by Enhancing Protein Phosphatase-2A Activity in Dopaminergic Neurons”, D. Zhang, A. Kanthasamy, Y. Yang, V. Anantharam, and A. Kanthasamy, 2007, J. Neurosci. 27:5349-5362.

3: “Novel cell death signaling pathways in neurotoxicity models of dopaminergic degeneration: Relevance to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease”, A. Kanthasamy, H. Jin, S. Mehrotra, R. Mishra, A. Kanthasamy, and A. Rana. 2010. NeuroToxicology 31:555-561.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3172: PKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosis and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192003411Mon, 01 Jun 2015 07:48:31 GMTDescription:
ISU researchers have developed a portfolio of technologies with potential as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of PD and as targets for the development of novel therapies.  This technology suite includes ISURF #s 3172, 3411, and 3728.   ISURF #3172 is an irreversible and competitive peptide inhibitor of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) cleavage site that demonstrates potent anti-apoptotic effects.  This cell permeable inhibitor is more potent than the commonly used inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk and has been shown to block caspase-3-dependent activation of PKCδ and DNA fragmentation in neuronal cell culture; neuronal protection has been demonstrated using Parkinson’s disease models.  ISURF #3411 describes effects of a PKCδ inhibitor which increases dopamine synthesis and confers neuroprotective effects in PD animal models.  ISURF #3728 includes the design and synthesis of analogs of the inhibitor with simpler structures and increased activity that have been demonstrated to confer neuroprotection in cell culture models of PD.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “A novel peptide inhibitor targeted to caspase-3 cleavage site of a proapoptotic kinase protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) protects against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease models”, V. Anantharam , D. Zhang , C. Latchoumycandane, H. Jin, S. Kaul, and A. Kanthasamy, 2006, Free Radical Biol. Med. 41:1578-1589.

2: “Protein Kinase Cδ Negatively Regulates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity and Dopamine Synthesis by Enhancing Protein Phosphatase-2A Activity in Dopaminergic Neurons”, D. Zhang, A. Kanthasamy, Y. Yang, V. Anantharam, and A. Kanthasamy, 2007, J. Neurosci. 27:5349-5362.

3: “Novel cell death signaling pathways in neurotoxicity models of dopaminergic degeneration: Relevance to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in Parkinson's disease”, A. Kanthasamy, H. Jin, S. Mehrotra, R. Mishra, A. Kanthasamy, and A. Rana. 2010. NeuroToxicology 31:555-561.

]]>Group:ISURF #3172: PKC Delta Cleavage Site Peptide Inhibitor for Use in Research and Diagnosis and

ISURF #3728: Parkinson’s Disease - Design, Synthesis and Functional Characterization of Rottlerin Analogs

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Healthcare| Life SciencesDual Beneficial Effect of Dopamine Enhancing and Neuroprotective Actions of PKC Delta Inhibitors for Treatment of Parkinson's DiseaseUtilityUnited States8,653,02311/479,1736/30/20062/18/20148/25/20315/7/20156/21/2017FalsepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19578Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an invention which provides novel gel forming methacrylic blocking copolymers that exhibit cationic pH-sensitive behavior as well as good water solubility. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic( polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) polymer. The polymers may be use for drug and gene delivery, protein separation, as structural supplements, and more.

Advantage:
• These copolymers are water-soluble, pH sensitive and capable of thermoreversible gelation near physiological temperatures.

Application:
* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplements

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195782954Tue, 26 May 2015 15:13:51 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplementsStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Materials| Veterinary MedicinepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gels and the Production ThereofUtilityUnited States7,217,77610/366,8642/14/20035/15/20072/14/20235/22/20155/22/2015FalseNon-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Plant Compounds for Nutraceutical or Pharmaceutical Useshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19384Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified compounds in orangegrass that have anti-inflammatory activity.

Description:
Medicinal plants, such as St. John’s Wort, have received attention as supplements to treat various conditions or to promote general health and well-being.  These plants also represent a valuable resource for the identification of compounds that may have utility as new therapeutic agents.  Hypericum gentianoides, or orangegrass, is a plant native to the eastern half of the United States that was used by Native Americans to treat a variety of disorders, such as fever or wounds.  While investigating the properties of organgegrass, ISU researchers have identified a series of closely related compounds in its extracts that exhibit anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of prostaglandin E synthesis.  These compounds are abundant in orangegrass relative to other secondary metabolites, demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity at low doses, and exhibit low cytotoxicity.  Thus, these natural compounds may have utility as nutraceuticals or as the basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents.

Advantage:
• Effective (doses as low as 1 ug/ml show anti-inflammatory activity)
• Abundant (the bioactive compounds account for approximately 20% of the dry plant tissue or 2% of the fresh tissue)
• Nontoxic (cytotoxicity is not observed at doses with anti-inflammatory activity)
• Versatile (may be used without modification for nutraceutical applications or as the starting point for new drug development)

Application:
Novel Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Topical Use or Drug Development

References:
“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

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Development Stage:
Molecular structure has been identified, and anti-inflammatory activity with limited cytotoxicity has been demonstrated at concentrations as low as 2 micromolar using purified compounds in a bioassay with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mammalian cells.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193843460Mon, 18 May 2015 14:24:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAnti-Inflammatory and Anti-HIV Compositions and Methods of UseUtilityUnited States7,854,94612/129,3915/29/200812/21/20102/24/20295/13/20159/9/2016False