Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:04:38 GMTSat, 23 Sep 2017 02:04:38 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityPropane Dehydrogenation over Carbide Catalysts with High Selectivityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26231Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a propane dehydrogenation method to transform shale gas efficiently to propylene, which allows a new route to the second most abundant polymer, polypropylene. This is the first example of using carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Shale gas contains large amounts of propane gas. As dehydrogenation of propane into propylene represents an enormous market opportunity, propane dehydrogenation catalysts have been highly valued and extensively researched. Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated that carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

Advantage:
• Significantly higher selectivity
• Low by-product formation
• Much reduced cost compared with current commercial catalysts

• Consistent conversion rate with the best commercial catalysts

Application:
Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.

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Wed, 13 Sep 2017 13:12:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/262314665Thu, 14 Sep 2017 12:49:41 GMTSummary:carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

]]>Advantage:]]>

]]>Application:Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseMethod for Synthesizing Magnet Alloys via Thermal Spray Using Recycled Materialhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26120Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to recycle rare earth elements (REE) waste from magnet processing as well as REE from end-of-life magnets using a very simple and economical process.  The process involves creating new magnetic material through a thermal spray technique, resulting in magnets with slightly lower magnetic performance (compared to sintered or bonded magnets produced from virgin material) but with much greater flexibility in magnet geometry and thickness than conventionally produced magnets.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Rare earth magnets play an essential role in many alternative energy technologies, electric cars, and in consumer electronic devices, but manufacturing of the magnets results in a substantial amount of waste REE material that is often not economical to recycle.  Similarly, recycling of REE from end of life products, in particular magnets from hard disk drives, is rarely pursued because of the economics of the processes.

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

Advantage:
• Low cost recycling method
• Gap magnet production with potential for unique and thin geometries
• Simple and economical processing

Application:
Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet material

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]]>Fri, 01 Sep 2017 10:42:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/261204605Fri, 01 Sep 2017 10:42:10 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet materialDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseLogarithmic Photo-Converter with Huge Dynamic Rangehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26090Summary:
This device is capable of measuring optical light levels that may vary from the single photon level up to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations. In fact, the upper range can be almost, apart from practical spatial details, as large as one desires. This device is possible due to the fact that the SiPMs can be exposed to daylight at full voltage without damage.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Light sources that fluctuate by huge factors, from single photons up to 106 to 109 photons, are not common but do occur in the forward regions of particle colliders. They may also occur in bioluminescent materials over slower times scales, and possibly in optical measurements in non-destructive evaluation where the light level is varied over orders of magnitude to assess damage to a material.

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.

Advantage:
• Simultaneously sensitive to single photos and to arbitrarily large light levels
• Dynamic range can be calibrated after manufacture
• Input light does not have to be filtered or modified
• Accepts all incident light

Application:
Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.

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]]>Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:10:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/260904612Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:13:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

For a very luminous light source, the choice is between a photo-detector that is sensitive to single photos but saturates above 100-to-1000 photos, or a photo-detector that attenuates the incident light in order to measure high light levels but which is therefore insensitive to single photons and low light levels.

This device, a "logarithmic photo-converter with huge dynamic range" is simultaneously sensitive to single photons and to arbitrarily large light levels. The dynamic range can be chosen at manufacture.]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Applications where measuring optical light levels may vary from the single photon to many orders of magnitude larger illuminations.Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSynthesis of pure or doped porous oxide materials through self-assembly of coordination polymerizationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25765Summary:
A simple, effective and controllable synthetic method for porous materials for markets of photo-catalysis, carbon capture, gas storage & separation and beyond

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Development Stage:

Description:
Porous materials are of technological significance in a broad range of market applications in catalysis, CO2 capture, gas storage, separations, or in situ reaction control. For instance, the carbon capture market was an estimated USD 4.25 billion in 2016 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 13.6% to USD 8.05 billion in 2021.

However, making the porous structure is often complicated and lacks precise control. Current technologies for porous materials uses oxy-hydroxides as starting materials and fabricate porous structures. The pore size and the distribution of these materials are designed using additives and optimization of kinetics of sintering process.

ISURF #04608 demonstrated a novel technique to generate porous metal oxides by using polymer chemistry and with easy design and control for pore structure and end product properties. This technology is more robust and simple than currently available technologies. This technique has already been demonstrated as useful for the conversion of CO2 into methane.

Advantage:
• Synthesis is more robust and simple than existing technology
• Easy design and control of pore structure
• Enables mixed composition materials to be easily created
• Photocatalysis of these porous material structures has been demonstrated to be superior to other metal oxides, such as TiO2 or VOx

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/257654608Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:16 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

However, making the porous structure is often complicated and lacks precise control. Current technologies for porous materials uses oxy-hydroxides as starting materials and fabricate porous structures. The pore size and the distribution of these materials are designed using additives and optimization of kinetics of sintering process.

ISURF #04608 demonstrated a novel technique to generate porous metal oxides by using polymer chemistry and with easy design and control for pore structure and end product properties. This technology is more robust and simple than currently available technologies. This technique has already been demonstrated as useful for the conversion of CO2 into methane.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseAutonomously self-healing and self-strengthening polymer-metal compositeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25764Summary:
Autonomously self-healing and self-strengthening polymer-metal composites developed at Iowa State University have the potential to impact many material markets.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Despite self-healing technology being available since 2001, there are limited commercial examples of self-healing materials. ISURF 04588 demonstrates the the application of undercooled particles in producing mechanically responsive and reconfigurable composites. The composite exploits the metastable nature of the particles, whereby the undercooled liquid metal trapped within the particles undergoes solidification when the oxide shell is broken or significantly deformed. Thus, the composite is capable of self-healing due to passivation of cracks by the metastable liquid and simultaneously self-strengthening, since the solidified metal will typically be stronger than its matrix.

This is an untapped market with potential in any applications where a more durable or longer lasting material may be desirable.

Advantage:
• No catalyst required
• Material is stronger than the “unrepaired” analogue
• Repaired area can be easily detected
• Applicable to a number of matrices

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]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/257644588Tue, 25 Jul 2017 12:57:15 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

This is an untapped market with potential in any applications where a more durable or longer lasting material may be desirable.

]]>Advantage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseFabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Depositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19293Summary:
Photonic crystals are optical materials that can be used to control and manipulate the flow of light. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for the producing photonic crystals that can be used as highly efficient light sources.

Description:
Ordinary incandescent lamps waste most of the supplied electric power to emit invisible light such as infrared. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals can be used as high-efficiency light emitting sources by reducing the radiation of undesired wavelengths. However, fabrication of three dimensional metallic photonic crystals using conventional semiconductor processing methods requires costly equipment and processes that are a barrier to commercialization of these highly efficient light sources. To overcome these obstacles, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microtransfer molding method for the fabrication of emissible metallic photonic crystals.

Advantage:
• Very low production costs
• Ease of fabrication
• Amenable to mass production

Application:
Highly efficient visible/infrared light source; Thermo-voltaic applications

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3583: Linearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Devices

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the 3D metallic photonic crystals are available for testing.

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 12:50:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192933282Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:33:15 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Group:ISURF #3583: Linearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Devices

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fabrication of Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Two Polymer Microtransfer MoldingUtilityUnited States7,625,51511/455,4866/19/200612/1/20094/1/20285/8/20158/4/2017FalseLinearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19246Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed fabrication methods for a polarized thermal emitter than can be used to create more efficient thermophotovoltaic devices for power generation.

Description:
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices can be used to generate power from photons, and consist of a thermal emitter and photodiode.  These devices can be used to help overcome limitations of photovoltatic (PV) devices solar cells—since sunlight is composed of many different wavelengths, not all incident photons have an energy larger than the energy band gap (Eg) of the semiconducting material of the photodiode and thus, not all photons can contribute to the photo-current.  If the thermal emitter of a TPV can absorb all incoming photons without discrimination and re-emit photons within a narrow range of energy that is optimized for the Eg of the photodiode, in principle, all energy carried by the incident photons can contribute for electricity generation, which leads results in enhanced energy conversion efficiency.  While thermal radiation from a thermal source is usually unpolarized, a class of micro-structures termed polarized thermal emitters can emit polarized thermal radiation; polarized thermal emitters avoid the energy loss usually incurred by filtering because they preferentially emit photons via their structural anisotropy, and thus can improve the efficiency of TPVs.  ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have now fabricated layer-by-layer photonic crystals that can be used for linearly polarized thermal emission.  This thermal emitter in conjunction with a sub-wavelength grating shows properties that are desirable for polarized thermal emitters for TPVs, including a high extinction ratio and high emissivity.  In addition, the emission range can be tuned by controlling the periodicity of the sub-wavelength grating.  The linearly polarized thermal emitter may thus have utility for improving the efficiency of TPVs used for power generation.

Advantage:
• Highly polarized thermal emission available at normal emergence
• High thermal radiation power
• Tunable emission range

References:
“Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The photonic crystals used to create the polarized thermal emitter have been demonstrated to enable control of both spectral emissivity and polarization in thermal radiation, and samples are available for testing. ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192463583Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:33:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

]]>Group:ISURF #3282: Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using Microtransfer Molding with Electro-Deposition

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals for Linearly-Polarized Thermal Emission and Thermophotovoltaic Device Including SameUtilityUnited States9,400,21912/754,6574/6/20107/26/20164/8/20339/13/20162/27/2017FalseMetamaterials-Based Device for Generation of Broadband Terahertz Radiationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21453Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a metamaterials-based terahertz emitter that could drastically improve communication speeds and imaging resolution.

Description:
The terahertz gap, which lies between the infrared and millimeter spectral regions (from approximately 100 GHz to 15THz) poses one of the most demanding challenges for technology and fundamental science today. The lack of efficient light sources and detectors makes THz physics one of the least explored parts of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. This is despite the underlying demand in the fields of communication and sensing, to push the gigahertz switching speed limit of today’s logic/memory/wireless communication devices into the terahertz range and to extend the conventional visible/infrared spectrum of today’s security and medical imaging devices into the THz spectrum, which provides more transparency and has more distinct spatial signatures suitable for non-invasive and label-free imaging.

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

Advantage:
• Faster communication/computing speeds
• Further miniaturization of devices
• Improved resolution imaging
• Label-free evaluation
• Metamaterial-based emitter outperforms thin film and crystal-based emitters

Application:
Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and Scientific

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 22 Feb 2016 12:25:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/214534109Mon, 17 Jul 2017 14:25:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and ScientificStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Broadband Terahertz Generation of MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,684,22114/989,5651/6/20166/20/20171/6/20367/17/20179/1/2017FalseBio-Based Lubricants Containing Hydroxy-Branched Fatty Acidshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25633Summary:
Hydroxy-branched fatty acids and their ester derivatives, when combined with appropriate base oils, have demonstrated  superior performance to commercially available petrochemically-derived lubricants.  The hydroxy-branched fatty acids, functionalized at the omega-terminus of the fatty acid, are produced using microbial fermentation, minimizing competion with food-crops.

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Development Stage:

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the use of omega-functionalized hydroxy-branched fatty acids as lubricant additives to provide superior lubricative properties.  These novel fatty acids, fatty-acid methyl esters, and low molecular weight fatty-acid polyesters are blended with base oils to produce high performing and sustainably-derived lubricants.

The hydroxy-branched fatty acids are functionalized at the omega-1 position, providing novel branching opportunites compared to fatty acids sourced from vegetable oils.  The omega-1 functionalized fatty acids provide superior properties to naturally-occuring hydroxy-branched fatty acids, and additionally benefit from being produced at high titer using microbial fermentation.

Advantage:
• Superior lubricative properties compared to natural oils and their derivatives.
• Blending of hydroxy-branched fatty acids, fatty acids methyl esters, and polyol-esters allow for tuning of lubricative properties.
• Production by microbial fermentation eliminates food-chemical competition.

Application:
Bio-derived lubricants for high-performance applications.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:30:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/256334553Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:30:02 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:

The hydroxy-branched fatty acids are functionalized at the omega-1 position, providing novel branching opportunites compared to fatty acids sourced from vegetable oils.  The omega-1 functionalized fatty acids provide superior properties to naturally-occuring hydroxy-branched fatty acids, and additionally benefit from being produced at high titer using microbial fermentation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDispersion Management with Metamaterialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19668Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

Description:
Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings
• Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable
• Offers customizability and a small footprint

Application:
Telecommunications

References:
1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

A proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196684091Wed, 21 Jun 2017 15:19:04 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

]]>Description:Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

]]>Advantage:Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings ]]>Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable ]]>Offers customizability and a small footprint]]>Application:Telecommunications

]]>References:1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngA proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersion Management with MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,588,25514/494,1749/23/20143/7/201711/21/20346/21/20176/21/2017FalseImproved Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ Passivationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19666Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

Description:
Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

Advantage:
• Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.
• Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.

Application:
Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

References:
“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196663993Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:54:54 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

]]>Description:Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

]]>Advantage:Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.]]>Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.]]>Application:Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

]]>References:“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ PassivationUtilityUnited States9,650,30913/986,1934/10/20135/16/20177/13/20346/21/20177/12/2017FalseCloaking with Footprints: A Novel Technique for Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based Serviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19261Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a novel method for location privacy protection so that location information cannot be directly linked to a particular individual through location-based services.

Description:
Location-based services (LBS) require location information from clients.  However, a person’s whereabouts may reveal sensitive private information, such as health condition or political affiliation.  Moreover, location information may make a person physically vulnerable, for example, to a personal threat.  Potential solutions for location privacy protection, such as using a pseudonym in requesting LBSs, does not protect a user’s anonymity because the location information itself may reveal that person’s real-world identity.  To overcome this challenge, ISU researchers have developed a novel cloaking technique for location privacy protection.  This technique uses a footprint—a user's location sample collected at some time point—to depersonalize a user’s location based on their historical location information and cloaking algorithms.  In addition, while the sizes of cloaking boxes produced by the existing approaches are highly dependent on the network density, footprint cloaking enables computation of a minimized cloaking area.  The existing techniques require all mobile users to report current location information; in contrast, this approach only requires the user who requests LBSs to provide location updates.  This eliminates server processing requirements and network loading.  This approach also enables depersonalization of a user’s trajectory as opposed to currently used methods since a time-series sequence of cloaking boxes forms a trajectory that may reveal the real identity of the user if, for example, it links to the user's home and office.  As a result, footprint cloaking is more practical, scalable and can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with both sporadic and continuous LBSs)
• Robust (enables fine cloaking resolution)
• Economical (performance studies have shown lower computation and communications costs

Application:
Location privacy protection

References:
Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype is available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192613620Wed, 08 Mar 2017 14:42:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “Exploring Historical Location Data for Anonymity Preservation in Location-based Services”, Toby Xu and Ying Cai, 2008, IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ. pp. 1220-1228.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesUtilityUnited States8,856,93912/555,4569/8/200910/7/201412/19/20325/8/20152/27/2017Cloaking with Footprints to Provide Location Privacy Protection in Location-Based ServicesDivisionalUnited States9,239,93514/472,4628/29/20141/19/20169/8/20293/8/20173/8/2017FalseImproved Synthesis Methods for N-acylethanolamineshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19136Summary:
Simple and efficient method to obtain n-stearoyl and n-palmitoylethanolamines

Description:
N-acylethanolamines of different chain length and structure exhibit a variety of biological activities and have been shown to reduce allergic reactions, inhibit mast cell degranulation, and exert neuroprotective effects in mammals. N-oleoythethanolamine exerts anorexigenic effects by binding to the nuclear receptors that cause appetite suppression, leading to body fat loss.  The University of California, Irvine, holds two patnets on the methods, compounds, and compositions for reducing body fat, appetite, body weight, food intake, and modulating fatty acid metabolism (US Patent Nos. 6,611,474 and 7,423,066) using n-oleoylethanolamine.  Traditional methods for the synthesis of these compounds use fatty acid chlorides, fatty acid methyl esters, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols as acyl donors to react with ethanolamine.  However, these methods result in low yields, and as a consequence, the n-acylethanoloamine compounds were high cost, limiting their commercial application.   Iowa State University researchers have discovered new approaches to obtain n-stearoyl and n-palmitoylethanolamines through simple and efficient methods using economical starting materials, as well as an effective process for the enzymatic synthesis of oleoylethanolamide.  Using these novel schemes, high yields with purities of >95% have been achieved with low energy input and reduced reaction time.  The scalability of these synthesis methods now provide for economical production of these nutraceutical products.  This technology is available for licensing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Advantage:
• Fast synthesis reaction
• Mild reaction conditions
• High purities (>95%)

Application:
Nutraceuticals

References:
1. "An Improved Method for Synthesis of N-stearoyl and N-palmitoylethanolamine", T. Wang, X. Wang 2012, J Am Oil Chem Soc.

2.  "Synthesis of Oleoylethanolamide Using Lipase", X. Wang, X. Wang, and T. Wang, 2012, J. Agric. Food Chem. 60, 451-457.

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
Samples have been successfully prepared

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191364021Wed, 08 Mar 2017 14:41:12 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1. "An Improved Method for Synthesis of N-stearoyl and N-palmitoylethanolamine", T. Wang, X. Wang 2012, J Am Oil Chem Soc.

2.  "Synthesis of Oleoylethanolamide Using Lipase", X. Wang, X. Wang, and T. Wang, 2012, J. Agric. Food Chem. 60, 451-457.

]]>Development Stage:Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method of Making Fatty Acid N-AcylalkanolaminesUtilityUnited States9,221,74713/869,0994/24/201312/29/201512/8/20333/8/20173/8/2017FalseModular Unit for Thermal Conductivity Measurements in Multiple Cryogenic/Magnetic Field Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24096Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a modular sample stage and thermal conductivity measurement device that is compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field apparatus.  This modular device allows for easy switching between apparatus to perform a variety of measurements without sample or thermometer remounting.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Description:
The thermal conductivity of a material is of great importance for determining suitability for a given application.  While many techniques have been developed to measure thermal conductivity at moderate temperatures, measurement at low (sub-kelvin) temperatures are difficult to achieve.  These low temperature measurements are important to characterize novel materials, particularly in determining the superconducting state while isolating electronic degrees of freedom.

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

Advantage:
• Modular sample stage and measurement device compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field devices.
• Minimizes sample handling and mounting and eliminates experimental error from different thermometers and calibration.

Application:
Low temperature (< 1K) thermal conductivity characterization of novel materials.

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]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:11:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240964582Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:11:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLubricated Mechanical Nanopolishing and Motor Oil for Self-Healing Metals and Ceramicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20754Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to produce extremely flat and smooth surfaces on hard materials without involving a chemical etchant.

Description:
Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a process used to create defect-free, smooth and flat surfaces, primarily for the semiconductor industry, and involves both mechanical polishing and chemical etching. CMP slurries (which provide the physical interface between the sample and the polishing equipment) typically consist of an abrasive (most often a metal oxide such as silica, ceria, alumina or zirconia), a liquid medium (normally water, but can be others depending on the application), and chemical agents (oxidizers, bases, acids) which treat the surface.
By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

Advantage:
• A 2 to 3 fold increase in surface smoothness
• Applicable to many hard surfaces
• May be extended to internal combustion engine lubricants
• May increase energy efficiency in treated engines

Application:
Semiconductor manufacture and internal combustion engine lubricants

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207544333Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:06:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseActive Noise Control System for Use in Noise Cancelling Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19258Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a system for noise control for use in noise cancelling devices such as headphones.

Description:
Reduction of noise in certain work and other environments is important for communication, safety, preservation of hearing, and for personal comfort.  Noise control using passive headsets generally provides substantial broadband noise reduction, but without the ability to selectively control one frequency of noise over another.  In addition, existing active noise control headsets have been limited to control of only low frequencies (less than 1 KHz) but are not able to reduce high frequency noise due to design limitations.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

Advantage:
• Selective (enables the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining desirable frequencies, such as those used for speech)
• Effective (enables mitigation of high frequency noises)
• Versatile (has utility in a wide variety of noisy environments, such dental offices, airplanes, machine shops and manufacturing facilities)

Application:
Noise control

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
An active noise control system consisting of a headset, speaker, microphone and controller has been developed, and large reductions of high frequency tonal noise have been demonstrated experimentally. 

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192583501Tue, 31 Jan 2017 12:47:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system that enables selective control of one region of the audio spectrum while leaving another uncontrolled, thus allowing the user to minimize unwanted noise while retaining the ability to hear wanted or useful noise.  The system is also able to significantly reduce undesirable high frequency noise by identifying frequencies associated with the loudest noise and creating multiple narrow-band reductions in these problematic regions.  This active noise control system has utility for situations or environments—such as machine shops, airplanes or dental offices—where reduction of distracting or potentially harmful noise is desirable, but where the ability to hear other noise for communication or other purposes is required.

]]>Advantage:Application:Noise controlStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Active Noise Control SystemUtilityUnited States9,558,73212/189,9678/12/20081/31/201712/2/20351/31/20173/6/2017FalseFunctionalization of Ceria with Phosphate for Catalytic Applicationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23788Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a catalyst functionalized with phosphate that allows for several catalytic processes to occur simultaneously.

Stage1.png

Description:
Ceria (CeO2) catalysts have been a useful solid phase catalyst that has seen an increase in industrial use recently due to its convenient and tunable redox activity. The Ce+3/Ce+4 catalytic cycle readily available on the surface of the substrate allows for facile oxygenation of several important organic substrates. Further alterations of ceria allows for more complex catalytic systems and specific tailorability. ISURF researchers achieve this tailorability by incorporating surface phosphates onto Ceria. Incorporation of the phosphate substrates increases the Brønsted acidity and upon deposition of Pd, the material showed activity for eugenol hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, propylene oxide hydrolysis, and indigo carmine photo degradation.

Advantage:
• Allows for a multi-functional catalysis
• Tailorable for higher selectivity
• Demonstrably higher yields of hydrogenation reactions

Application:
Hydrogenation catalysis

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:28:41 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237884539Tue, 24 Jan 2017 08:56:05 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage1.pngDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Hydrogenation catalysisDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseHigh-Throughput selective capture of biological cells by dielectrophoresis at a bipolar electrode arrayhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23519Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a device that employs an array of > 1,400 wireless electrodes for the continuous high-throughput isolation of cells that often are expressed in small concentrations.

Description:
ISURF #04548 describes an array of > 1,400 wireless bipolar electrodes (BPEs) in dielectrophoresis (DEP) devices. This allows for a large volume of cells to quickly be sorted based on dielectrophoric response. Without ohmic contact to the individual array elements, capacitive charging of the electrical double layer at opposing ends of each BPE allows an AC electric field applied by only two driving electrodes to be transmitted across the entire device. The electric field distribution is readily tuned by altering the dimensionality of BPEs. A suggested use of this technology is for detecting the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC), which can be expressed as low as 1 in a billion cells, and that current technologies fall short of being able effectively diagnose, resulting in false negatives of patients in remission. ISU researches have thus far shown promising results of separating out breast cancer cells from white blood cell fractions.

Advantage:
• DEP separation allows for good sensitive and high specificity
• Wireless technology allows for new architectures and large arrays
• High throughput of cell

Application:
Cell capture and seperation

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:08:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235194548Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:09:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseDevelopment of a Printable Graphene using Pulsed Laser Annealing for Electrochemical Sensing and Biosensinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22188Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process that can be used to produce flexible circuits such as biosensors.

Description:
Printable graphene ink can be printed onto flexible materials via an ink jet printer.  This process can be used to produce flexible circuits such as biosensors.  The ISU researchers have combined the properties of a new ink formulation with a laser post-annealing process that results in the printed graphene sheet having a resistance of < 1 kOhm which has not been reported in previous literature.  Such low resistance means the printed graphene should perform better in all electrical applications including sensing and biosensing.

Advantage:
• Unprecedented low-resistance properties
• Increased flexibility of circuitry
• Process requires only off-the-shelf equipment
• No high temperature heating
• Compatible with various base materials

Application:
Flexible circuit production

References:
1. http://www.news.iastate.edu/news/2016/09/01/paperelectronics

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:19:29 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/221884393Thu, 27 Oct 2016 12:47:36 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:http://www.news.iastate.edu/news/2016/09/01/paperelectronics ]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSolution Phase Synthesis of Highly Processible Nanocrystalline LiZnP and Similar Ternary Semiconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20756Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel synthesis method to produce Nowotny-Juza semiconductors LiZnP and LiCdP.

Description:
Nowotny-Juza phase materials are intermetallic crystal materials with potential for a variety of applications, and are of particular interest because their electronic structure makes them amenable to applications in solar cells (light to energy conversion), thermoelectrics (heat to energy conversion), optoelectronics (LEDs, laser diodes) and anode materials.  This technology is a novel method of preparing LiZnP and LiCdP materials using solution phase chemistry that results in rapid synthesis of the desired materials at moderate temperatures.  The resultant materials are phase pure, crystalline and have a size on the order of 20nm. In addition to the potential applications listed above, LiZnP is expected to be able to replace cadmium sulfide as the buffer material for Copper Indium Galium Selenide (CIGS) solar cells, reducing the environmental footprint of these thin-film photovoltaics.

Advantage:
• Novel solution phase chemistry
• Rapid reaction with high conversion rate at moderate temperatures
• Tunable particle sizes

Application:
LED Lighting, CIGS Solar Cells, Quantum Dots

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:54 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207564401Tue, 20 Sep 2016 09:18:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePropane Dehydrogenation Catalyst with Greatly Enhanced Lifespanhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22835Summary:
Iowa State University and researchers have developed a process to platinum-tin catalysts for propane dehydrogenation to enhance catalyst lifetime before regeneration up to six-fold.

Description:
Propane dehydrogenation is a common method to produce propylene, one of the most important chemical building blocks. Platinum-tin catalysts have been shown to have high selectivity towards propylene with good yield, but suffer from quick deactivation from coking. Iowa State researchers have discovered a treatment method that provides a six-fold increase in catalyst life before coking and deactivation without sacrificing selectivity and yield.

Advantage:
• A six-fold increase in catalyst life before deactivation
• No decrease in yield or selectivity relative to conventionally-treated catalysts
• Cost effective process performed at moderate temperatures and pressures

Application:
Propane dehydrogenation to propylene

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 13 Sep 2016 11:39:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/228354408Tue, 13 Sep 2016 11:39:28 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicrowave Plasma Throttled Combustion of Energetic Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20339Summary:
Future mission requirements of energetic material systems demand the ability to a tune the output (burning rate, thrust, specific impulse, radiant emission) of a broad range of energetic materials. More specifically for solid propellants, considerable work has been conducted on the development of electrical and valved throttling techniques. However, these techniques are either formulation-specific or are propellant temperature limited. Conversely, the proposed plasma throttling technique has been demonstrated with a number of solid propellant and pyrotechnic compositions and is not formulation specific. This enables throttling of higher performance energetic systems. In this method, a pulsed microwave source is used to deposit energy to the gas-phase flame of a burning energetic material. Steady combustion of the energetic material is perturbed to an unsteady state through microwave absorption within the gas-phase flame of an energetic material that is doped with materials which themselves or in decomposition produce species which readily couple with microwave irradiation within the gas phase combustion flame in order to produce ionization and/or formation of a plasma. The resulting enhanced energy feedback to the burning surface enables drastic enhancement of energetic material burning rate.

Advantage:
• Enhanced control: Throttling of the combustion rate of an energetic material
• Enhanced performance: Resulting plasma and flame temperature increase enhances radiometric emission of pyrotechnics (e.g. decoy flares) and may also enhance specific impulse of propellants.
• Formulation-independent throttling of the combustion of energetic materials, enabling throttling the performance of a broad range of energetics (composite, double-base, CMDB propellants, and pyrotechnics)
• Unobtrusive, light weight technique: No heavy or flame-exposed hardware is required; throttling hardware exists outside the region of combustion
• High tunability: Pulsed microwave deposition can allow high tunability of propellant combustion through control of repetition rate and duty cycle

Application:
Solid/hybrid/liquid propulsion, pyrotechnics

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

References:
J. Lynch, M. Ballestero, R. Cazin, J. B. Michael, T. R. Sippel, “Microwave-Supported Plasma Combustion Enhancement of Composite Solid Propellants Using Alkali Metal Dopants,” to be presented at the 54th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Jan. 4-8, 2016, San Diego CA.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 22 Sep 2015 08:10:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/203394381Tue, 13 Sep 2016 09:58:16 GMTSummary:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forReferences:Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSelective Chemical Separation of Rare-Earth Oxalateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20984Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a cost effective step that easily separates rare earth oxalates into a light rare earth stream and a heavy rare earth stream.

Description:
For many rare earth ores, the percentage of the valuable heavy rare earths (in particular, terbium, europium, dysprosium, yttrium and gadolinium) in the ore is very low, making separation and recovery of these elements from the other rare earths not cost-effective.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that can be added on to conventional ore processing that readily separates rare earth oxalates into two streams, one containing the light rare earths (La – Sm) and the other containing heavy rare earths (Gd – Y).  This one step process requires no special equipment and minimal capital investment.  The process is water-based, and uses a “green” extractant to remove the heavy REEs from the light REEs.

Advantage:
• Chemical separation of rare earth elements into high-value and low-value streams
• Simple and fast – one-step process does not require special process equipment
• Environmentally friendly – uses green extract in place of hazardous organophosphorous compounds
• Cost effective

Application:
Rare earth ore processing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209844327Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:10:38 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth ore processingPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTransient electronics with improved electrical conductivity by incorporating insoluble metalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21030Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed transient electronics with superior electrical performance compared to systems which use metal oxide conductors.  While the conductive material in these new electronic devices do not dissolve, they do adequately disperse to obscure the design and purpose of the device.

Description:
While transient electronics for use in medical applications require complete dissolution in benign fluids, many applications don’t require this level of degradability.  Many applications only require that the circuit not be usable or capable of being reverse engineered once it has exceeded its lifespan.  For these highly-sensitive applications, Iowa State University researchers have developed a solution that has superior electrical performance compared to soluble metal oxide conductors.  By utilizing this technology, insoluble metal conductors are dispersed in response to appropriate environmental conditions, thus obscuring the design and purpose of the circuit.

Advantage:
• Better electrical performance compared to soluble metal oxides
• Dispersion of metal in response to environmental conditions and solubilization of the circuit board support

Application:
Transient electronics for highly sensitive applications

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210304395Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:44:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Transient electronics for highly sensitive applicationsPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProcess for Fabrication of Efficient Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19420Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for fabrication of solar cells with increased efficiency.

Description:
Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight.  However, the efficiency of organic solar cells is about 4-6%, and increasing this efficiency is critical for developing practical applications and commercially viable devices.  One approach to increasing efficiency is to increase the light absorption on the organic film without increasing the thickness of the photoactive layer, and various light management techniques have been tried for enhancing optical absorption, such as collection mirrors, patterned substrates and microprism substrates.  However, these approaches require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for conformal coating of polymer photovoltaic layers on microtextured substrates for increased light trapping.  The light management architecture of these solar cells enables a high degree of light absorption in even very thin photoactive films and leads to improved power conversion efficiency.

Advantage:
• Efficient (improves light absorption and power conversion)
• Economical (can be fabricated using low-cost and scalable soft lithography techniques)

Application:
Photovoltaics

References:
1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A 20% increase in efficiency has been observed experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194203677Mon, 15 Aug 2016 15:52:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Textured Micrometer Scale Templates as Light Managing Fabrication Platform for Organic Solar CellsUtilityUnited States9,401,44213/223,3519/1/20117/26/201610/17/20338/15/20162/27/2017FalseHigh Sensitivity MEMS Pressure Sensorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22233Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a high-sensitivity microelectromechanical system (MEMS), graphene-based pressure sensor that outperforms any existing MEMS-based small footprint pressure sensor.

Description:
ISU researchers have developed a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) graphene-based pressure sensor realized by transferring a large area, few-layered graphene on a suspended silicon nitride thin membrane perforated by a periodic array of micro-through-holes. Each through-hole is covered by a circular drum-like graphene layer, namely a graphene “microdrum”. The uniqueness of the sensor design is the fact that introducing the through-hole arrays into the supporting nitride membrane allows generating an increased strain in the graphene membrane over the through-hole array by local deformations of the holes under an applied differential pressure. Further reasons contributing to the increased strain in the devised sensitive membrane include larger deflection of the membrane than that of its imperforated counterpart membrane, and direct bulging of the graphene microdrum under an applied pressure.

Advantage:
• 10X sensitivity compared to other MEMS sensors
• Good linearity over a wide pressure range
• Numerous applications
• Rapidly expanding market

Application:
Microsensors

References:
1. Graphene "microdrums" on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors. Qiugu Wang, Wei Hong, Liang Dong, Nanoscale 2016 Mar;8(14):7663-71

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 14 Jun 2016 11:05:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/222334491Wed, 15 Jun 2016 12:50:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Graphene "microdrums" on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors. Qiugu Wang, Wei Hong, Liang Dong, Nanoscale 2016 Mar;8(14):7663-71 ]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicroscale Tentacle Actuatorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21029Description:
ISU researchers have invented a soft material-based manipulator for delicate, fragile microscale objects. It is based on a thin-walled elastomeric microtube with an asymmetric wall thickness distribution and one end closed. Upon applying air pressure from the open end, the microtube becomes elongated non-uniformly, bending towards the thick-walled side. This type of bending, however, is often insufficient to induce a spiraling which mimics the coiling motion of biological tentacles, such as those of the octopus. To amplify the bending into multi-turn spiraling, we installed a small extra thickness (i.e., hump) to the exterior of the microtube. When the size and position of the hump were adequate, the microtube could accomplish multi-tum spiraling which is ideal for winding around small objects and scoop them up. This type of conformal spiraling motion is non-destructive since it does not involve squeezing and will be useful for safe handling of cell aggregates, eggs, or biological tissues that are highly fragile.

Advantage:
• Can handle soft, fragile micro-objects that is not offered today
• Capable of grabbing objects as small as ~ 185 µM with a grabbing force of ~ 0.78 mN
• Unique fabrication techniques of the thin, highly deformable microtubes

Application:
Biological microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS)

References:
Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes


Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210294387Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:15:31 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Microrobotic tentacles with spiral bending capability based on shape-engineered elastomeric microtubes

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBiorenewable Biopolymers for Use as Carbon Fiber Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19667Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

Description:
As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

Advantage:
• Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)
• Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)

Application:
Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

References:
Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
The feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196674056Tue, 24 May 2016 09:14:13 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

]]>Description:As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

]]>Advantage:Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)]]>Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)]]>Application:Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

]]>References:Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngThe feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Process of Making Carbon Fibers From Compositions Including Esterified Lignin and Poly (Lactic Acid)UtilityUnited States9,340,42514/048,53210/8/20135/17/20167/26/20345/24/20162/27/2017FalseCustom Microstructure Patterning for Metal Matrix Composites (MMC)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20857Description:
One of the challenges in making layered metal composites reinforced at interfaces has been controlling the dispersion and microstructure of the reinforcement particles.  The reinforcement elements are typically applied at the interface by manual spreading using brush or by immersing the substrate in a suspension.  The technology described herein provides a method of fabricating a metal matrix composite wherein the method involves ultrasonic spraying reinforcement particles through a patterned mask to deposit on individual metallic sheets a pattern of discrete islands of reinforcement particles. 
The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

Advantage:
• A wide range of MMC’s such as copper, aluminum, magnesium nickel and their alloys can benefit from this process.  Sheets or foils of such metallic matrix can be used.
• A wide variety of nano-scale reinforcement particulate materials such as silicon carbide, aluminum oxide and titanium carbide may be deposited using this method
• Simple and low-cost process using an ultrasonic spraying which can be practiced using commercially available equipment
• Accurate control of the deposition rate resulting in a smoother and more uniform deposition utilizing a very low spraying velocity
• Flexibility in producing thin multilayered deposited structures

Application:
Metal laminate composites

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Wed, 11 Nov 2015 14:35:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/208574311Tue, 24 May 2016 09:11:55 GMTDescription:The yield and ultimate flexural strengths of the laminate composite AL6061 reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles increased by 32% and 15% respectively, with little or no decrease in ductility, compared with those of the unreinforced sample prepared at the same condition.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA Method to Create Ultra-flat Metal Surfaceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21858Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method to produce ultra-flat metal surfaces without the compromises inherent to chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP).

Description:
Ultra-flat surfaces are important commercially for the semiconductor fabrication industry, and also are of interest for scientific studies of self-assembled monolayers, bilayers, electrodes and single-molecules. There are several methods to create ultra-flat surfaces including CMP which is the most common method currently used but is often a method of compromises, attempting to balance material removal rate against the susceptibility to produce scratches and other faults into the material. ISU researchers have developed new method of creating ultra-flat surfaces through a “mechanical annealing” process. The technique involves the bombardment of a surface with atoms (principally from transition metals) that fill in surface faults and results in an atomically flat surface.

Advantage:
• Significant cost reduction compared to CMP
• Consistent, reproducible flat surface
• Very large semiconductor market
• Minimal cleanup after surface fabrication

Application:
Semiconductor fabrication and scientific research

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 05 May 2016 13:14:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218584336Thu, 05 May 2016 13:32:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDouble lens device for tunable harmonic generation of laser beams in KKBBF/RBBF crystalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21825Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an improvement to KBBF crystal systems for the generation of ultraviolet laser light by creating an alternative prism geometry that eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling devices.

Description:
Lasers consisting of light from the ultra-violet portion of the spectrum have both scientific and commercial applications. Scientifically, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lasers can be used in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic parameters of solids. Commercially VUV lasers are of interest in semiconductor manufacturing, as the wavelength of the higher frequency spectra could produce much finer structures using photolithography. One source for generation of VUV lasers is passing a lower frequency laser beam through potassium beryllium fluoroborate (KBBF) crystals, resulting in a harmonic frequency laser. For economic reasons, KBBF crystals are grown very thin; as incident light upon the crystals is at a very acute angle, the resultant VUV laser has a low efficiency as most of the light is subsequently reflected off the surface of the crystal.

Advantage:
• Generates desired ultraviolet laser light
• Alternative prism geometry
• Eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling
• Allows for easy tuning of the laser beam

Application:
Laser optics, Semiconductor manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218254246Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:41:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMembrane Engineering via Trans-Unsaturated Fatty Acids Production Improves Escherichia coli Robustness and Production of Membrane-Damaging Compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21826Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a process to increase the tolerance of E. coli towards membrane-damaging compounds, allowing for increased production of a growth-inhibiting product.

Description:
Escherichia coli is a commonly used host for production of proteins, fatty acids, and other molecules via fermentation. One potential limitation to increased titer of these fermentation products is growing instability of the cell membrane due to higher product concentrations. Various routes have been taken to enhance the robustness of the membrane towards these products, including changing the amount of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell and lengthening the lipid length to increase the membrane thickness. However, these routes have not demonstrated increases in production of the target molecule.

Iowa State University researchers have developed a system to impact production by modifying the ratio of trans- to cis- unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. By introducing a cis-trans isomerase gene into E. coli and varying the promoters for that gene to regulate the ratio of cis- and trans- unsaturated fatty acids in the membrane, optimal conditions for the production of octanoic acid were determined. Use of this technique was also demonstrated to enhance tolerance to alcohols, organic acids, and aromatic compounds.

Advantage:
• Ability to optimize gene expression to maximize target molecule production
• No cell growth penalty versus control strain in non-inhibitory conditions
• Demonstrated increase in tolerance to a variety of exogenous and produced molecules

Application:
Increased target molecule production via fermentation

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218264427Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:24:25 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Escherichia coli is a commonly used host for production of proteins, fatty acids, and other molecules via fermentation. One potential limitation to increased titer of these fermentation products is growing instability of the cell membrane due to higher product concentrations. Various routes have been taken to enhance the robustness of the membrane towards these products, including changing the amount of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell and lengthening the lipid length to increase the membrane thickness. However, these routes have not demonstrated increases in production of the target molecule.

Iowa State University researchers have developed a system to impact production by modifying the ratio of trans- to cis- unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. By introducing a cis-trans isomerase gene into E. coli and varying the promoters for that gene to regulate the ratio of cis- and trans- unsaturated fatty acids in the membrane, optimal conditions for the production of octanoic acid were determined. Use of this technique was also demonstrated to enhance tolerance to alcohols, organic acids, and aromatic compounds.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUse of linseed oil-derived materials as rejuvenators of vacuum tower bottom and reclaimed asphalt pavementhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21827Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed formulations to use bio-derived materials as flux and/or rejuvenators for using vacuum tower bottoms (VTB) and reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in warm mix asphalt.

Description:
Heated bodied linseed oil and partially hydrogenated heated bodied linseed oil were used as flux and/or rejuvenators for asphalt binders made from vacuum tower bottoms (VTB). These bio-derived materials were able to improve the binder performance grade from 76-10 to PG 70-22 and PG 64-22 grades. As VTB is at a distinct price advantage over other binder materials, use of this material as a flux results in a significant decrease in costs.

Advantage:
• Large improvement in usability of VTB as an asphalt binder
• Applicable to warm mix asphalt that includes RAP at a lower price than other rejuvenators
• Bio-derived materials

Application:
Warm mix asphalt paving

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218274419Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSensor for In-Situ, Wireless Soil Sensinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19678Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel, self-calibrating sensor for moisture and nutrients in soil that has wireless transmission and reception capability, making it especially useful as a sensing node for applications that are distributed over a wide area.

Description:
The advent of technologies such as GPS has driven the development of precision agriculture, which enables farmers to avail inter- and intra-field variations to manage resources and inputs so that costs and environmental impacts are minimized and productivity is maximized.  To help facilitate the management of important agricultural resources, ISU researchers have developed a self-calibrating, reliable and energy efficient soil moisture and nutrient sensor which can be buried at approximately root depth and is capable of wireless transmission and reception.  This sensor, which is based on the principle of impedance spectroscopy, can take real-time measurements of soil moisture and nutrient concentrations and transmit at frequencies much less than cellular, resulting in a much larger range.  The sensor is particularly well-suited for deployment as a node in a network of sensors that are spread over a large area, such as an agriculture field or drainage basin.

Advantage:
• Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements
• Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability
• Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions

Application:
Precision Agriculture; Environmental Monitoring; Underground to Above Ground Communication

References:
1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Prototype on-board sensors have been tested for soil monitoring applications using soil containing saline water and shown to have utility for measuring both soil moisture and ionic concentrations.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196784183Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:23:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements]]>Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability]]>Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModeling Approach for Simulink/Stateflow Diagrams to Ease Analysis of Embedded Softwarehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19250Summary: Iowa State University researchers have developed a modeling approach for Simulink diagrams that can be used for further analysis such as test generation and formal verification.

Description:
Simulink is a commercial tool for graphical representation and simulation of dynamic systems, and Simulink/Stateflow (S/S) diagrams can be used to capture time or event-driven dynamics.  Simulation of S/S diagrams can be use to generate sample runs for validation. Further validation can be performed through testing, verification and monitoring, with automated testing, verification and monitoring desirable.  However, current approaches for modeling S/S diagrams in a format amenable to automatic test generation, verification and monitoring are inadequate.  To overcome this limitation, ISU researchers have developed a modeling approach for an industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow diagrams using input/output extended finite automata (I/O-EFA), which is a formal model amenable for analysis.  The input-output behavior of an I/O-EFA model, as defined in terms of a step-trajectory, preserves the input-output behavior of the corresponding Simulink/Stateflow diagram at each sample time.  This approach is recursive and modular that models atomic blocks and recursively and modularly combines such blocks for forming models of more complex Simulink/Stateflow diagrams from the simpler ones.  The modeling approach has utility for automated test generation, verification or monitoring for fault-detection of embedded software developed using Simulink/Stateflow diagrams, or other similar simulation tools such as LabView.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution


Advantage:
• Efficient (modeling is recursive and modular)
• Effective  (amenable to automated test generation for comprehensive coverage such as MCDC or comprehensive verification, monitoring, and fault-detection)
• Versatile (can be applied to industry-level useful fragment of Simulink/Stateflow)
• Precise (precisely preserves the discrete-time semantics)

References:

Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
This modeling approach is available for testing

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:04 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192503739Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:14:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #4266:  Reduction of Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow to Reachability and its Novel Resolution

]]>Advantage:References:Conference Proceedings: "Modeling Simulink Diagrams using Input/Output Extended Finite Automata", Changyan Zho and Ratnesh Kumar, 2009, 6th International Workshop on Software Cybernetics, Seattle, WA.

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Semantic Translation of Time-Driven Simulink Diagrams Using Input/Output Extended Finite AutomataUtilityUnited States8,655,63613/165,9076/22/20112/18/20143/8/20325/8/20156/21/2017Semantic Translation of Stateflow Diagrams into Input/Output Extended Finite Automata and Automated Test Generation for Simulink/Stateflow DiagramsCIPUnited States8,849,62613/538,4726/29/20129/30/201411/2/20315/8/20152/27/2017FalsePt-Modified (Gamma)-Ni+(Gamma Prime)-Ni3Al-Based Compositions for High-Temperature, Degradation-Resistant Structural Alloyshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21700

Summary:
ISU researchers have developed novel compositions that are specifically intended for high-strength, high-temperature resistant structural metallic alloys in novel architectures including honeycomb, truss-core or barrier foils. The compositions are particularly relevant to high-temperature coatings for aerospace applications such as space reentry vehicles and hypersonic missiles.

Description:
High value-added aerospace systems such as space re-entry and hypersonic missiles routinely require localized heat protection during service.  Materials that provide refractory protection must be oxidation resistant themselves. Degradation by oxidation is the key limitation of advanced materials such as carbon-carbon composites or refractory metal silicides. Most commercial alloys do not exhibit adequate oxidation resistance, largely due to the structure and kinetics of the oxides they form.

To further enhance properties of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloys such as strength and ductility, this technology is based on the finding that addition of up to 20% strengthening elements can be added without substantially altering the γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni phase stability. Suitable strengthening elements include, Cr, Si, Co, Mo, Re, Ta, W. The resulting strengthened alloy compositions form highly adherent, slow-growing TGO scales during both isothermal and cyclic oxidation at high temperatures (1150-1200° C). The technology is also based on the finding that controlling the Al content of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloy compositions to below about 16% renders them heat treatable.

Advantage:
• Enhanced strength and ductility
• Oxidation resistant

Application:
Aerospace Coatings

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:42:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217003201Thu, 07 Apr 2016 14:05:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

To further enhance properties of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloys such as strength and ductility, this technology is based on the finding that addition of up to 20% strengthening elements can be added without substantially altering the γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni phase stability. Suitable strengthening elements include, Cr, Si, Co, Mo, Re, Ta, W. The resulting strengthened alloy compositions form highly adherent, slow-growing TGO scales during both isothermal and cyclic oxidation at high temperatures (1150-1200° C). The technology is also based on the finding that controlling the Al content of certain γ′-Ni3Al+γ-Ni alloy compositions to below about 16% renders them heat treatable.

]]>Advantage:Application:Aerospace CoatingsStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Pt-Metal Modified (Gamma)-Ni+(Gamma Prime)-Ni3Al-Alloy Compositions for High-Temperature Degradation Resistant Structural AlloysUtilityUnited States8,821,65412/173,6837/15/20089/2/20144/1/20304/7/20169/13/2017FalseSoil Nitrate System for Precision Management of Nitrogen Fertilizer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20755Description:
The soil nitrate sensing system allows nitrate to be analyzed rapidly in-real-time in the field. By measuring nitrate at multiple locations along with GPS coordinates for each location, the system can be used to rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations, which can be used as the basis for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications. Alternatively the sensor can be attached to (integrated with) a fertilizer applicator, allowing real time modulation of nitrogen fertilizer application rates based on measured soil nitrate levels. The soil nitrate sensing technology will make the Late Spring Nitrate Test (LSNT) practical and cost effective for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications.

Advantage:
• Real-time, on-the-go soil nitrate concentration sensing technology that can be attached to farm implements
• Measures soil nitrate concentrations in the parts per million range within ~1 second, so GPS registered data stream can be acquired
• Depth averaging (0 to 12 inches) to meet LSNT protocol
• System can rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations
• Makes precision sidedress nitrogen fertilizer applications possible – improving nitrogen use efficiency in crop production, saving farmers money, and reducing impact on the environment

Application:
Precision agriculture

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207554383Mon, 14 Mar 2016 12:13:34 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModification of Wettability Properties of Copper for Heat Transfer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19687

Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated enhanced heat transfer efficiency for phase change operations.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have produced biphilic copper surfaces by chemical modification of the surface. Using this method, spatially controlled hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas exist proximately on a single surface; the hydrophilic areas promote contact between the liquid phase and the heat transfer surface, leading to an enhancement in the critical heat flux, while the hydrophobic areas increase nucleation sites, resulting in an enhanced heat transfer coefficient. Discrete patterns can be created to further enhance the efficiency of boiling and promote energy efficiency.

Advantage:
• Micropatterning of copper produces biphillic surface to both promote nucleation and enhance the contact of liquid water to the surface
• Coating-free method provides long-term surface treatment

Application:
Heat exchangers, boilers

References:
“Boiling heat transfer on superhyrdophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces”, A.R. Betz et al., 2012, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 57: 733-741

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Development Stage:
Stage1.png

Desc0000.png

 

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196874235Thu, 03 Mar 2016 12:44:17 GMTSummary:
]]>Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated enhanced heat transfer efficiency for phase change operations.

]]>Description: ]]>Iowa State University researchers have produced biphilic copper surfaces by chemical modification of the surface. Using this method, spatially controlled hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas exist proximately on a single surface; the hydrophilic areas promote contact between the liquid phase and the heat transfer surface, leading to an enhancement in the critical heat flux, while the hydrophobic areas increase nucleation sites, resulting in an enhanced heat transfer coefficient. Discrete patterns can be created to further enhance the efficiency of boiling and promote energy efficiency.

]]>Advantage: ]]>Micropatterning of copper produces biphillic surface to both promote nucleation and enhance the contact of liquid water to the surface ]]>Coating-free method provides long-term surface treatment]]>Application: ]]>Heat exchangers, boilers

]]>References: ]]>“Boiling heat transfer on superhyrdophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces”, A.R. Betz et al., 2012, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 57: 733-741

]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDevelopment Stage:Stage1.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rare earth elementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21023Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:50:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210234150Thu, 25 Feb 2016 14:44:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHigh-Throughput Large Scale Plant Phenotyping Instrumentationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21041Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a microfluidic device to screen genotype-to-phenotype interactions.

Description:
Through an array of miniature greenhouses (MGHs), vertical microfluidic seed chips (MSCs), and microfluidic control logic. The plant growth system can provide maximal environmental flexibility in large- and multi-scale study of plant-environment interactions. Each MGH can flexibly regulate relative humidity (RH), C02 level, and light intensity via controlled microfluidic capillary filling, controlled chemical reaction, and liquid crystal technologies, respectively. The ve1tical MSCs are designed to be sliding chip-like disposable components for use inside the MGHs.  Useful for monitoring plant pathogen interactions, phenotyping of Arapidopsis plants at the whole organism and cellular level.

Advantage:
• High spatial and temporal resolution
• Easy to use, cost effective
• Allows seamless monitoring of both root and shoot phenotypes
• Easily fabricated using conventional soft lithography

Application:
High throughput plant phenotype assays at the whole organism and cellular level

References:
1. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis. Jiang H1, Xu Z, Aluru MR, Dong L. Lab Chip. 2014 Apr 7;14(7):1281-93.

2. A microfluidic whole-plant phenotyping device, Jiang, H.,  Xu, Z., Aluru, M.R.; Dong, L.
Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXVII), 2013 Transducers & Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference.

3. Iowa State engineer builds instrument to study effects of genes, environment on plant traits

4. YouTube video

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:16:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210414223Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:20:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis. Jiang H1, Xu Z, Aluru MR, Dong L. Lab Chip. 2014 Apr 7;14(7):1281-93.

2. A microfluidic whole-plant phenotyping device, Jiang, H.,  Xu, Z., Aluru, M.R.; Dong, L.
Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXVII), 2013 Transducers & Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference.

3. Iowa State engineer builds instrument to study effects of genes, environment on plant traits

4. YouTube video

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTriple Halo Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Coilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21028Description:
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, safe method for the treatment of neurologic disorders such as depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Parkinson's disease. Currently, TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of depression.  The existing commercial TMS coils can only stimulate the cortical regions of the brain. For the success of the treatment of other neurological disorders, there is a need for the development of TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain. Development of deep brain stimulation coils is challenging as the magnetic field decays rapidly with the distance from the source (coil surface). Magnetic fields with sufficient magnitude to stimulate the deeper regions of the brain should not stimulate the scalp of the patients. ISU researchers have developed a novel coil design based on our earlier "Halo Coil" configuration. This design of the new coil called the "Triple Halo Coil" will be able to stimulate deeper regions of the brain.

Advantage:
• The first of its kind that could potentially be used for the treatment of deep brain disorders non-invasively, safely and in an out-patient setting
• Capable of stimulating deeper regions of the brain with more than 10 times the magnetic field for the same amount of surface field at a depth of 10 cm
• Coils have been configured such that they do not overstimulate any part of the brain surface
• Electric and magnetic fields were calculated in heterogeneous head models

Application:
Health care. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210284376Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:20:32 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMethods of room temperature cold-plastic forming or patterning of amorphous alloyshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21130Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to form amorphous metal alloys at room temperature without introducing shear bands or micro-crystalline structure into the alloy.

Description:
Amorphous alloys are desirable for use in high precision parts because the mechanical properties of these alloys, combined with the lack of grain boundaries, make them particularly suitable for fine-scale imprinting and patterning.  Thermo-plastic forming has often been utilized to form glassy metals, though this technique is inappropriate at room temperature because of the development of narrow shear bands in the metal.  These shear bands induce brittleness into the metal, often resulting in catastrophic failure of the part.  Various techniques may be used to achieve sufficient deformability of the alloy, including adding crystalline particles to create a second phase, controlling the deformation geometry, and raising the processing temperature of the alloy.  All of these techniques result in shortcomings in the resultant product.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

Advantage:
• Room temperature processing avoids embrittlement formed by sub-Tg annealing
• Process does not induce generation of shear bands in the alloy
• Provides control over deformation behavior of bulk amorphous alloys

Application:
Forming and patterning of bulk amorphous metal alloys

References:
Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 17 Dec 2015 10:26:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/211304181Thu, 17 Dec 2015 10:28:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDynamic Advance Reservation with Delayed Allocation Over Wavelength-Routed Networkshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21058Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel routing, slot, and wavelength assignment (RSWA) technique called single-slot advance reservation (SSAR).  This method allows for large datat transfer over Grid networks

Description:
This new continuous advance reservation process that checks all available time slots to prevent delays in transmission. This approach avoids fragmentation as a result of delayed resource allocation. The method allocates wavelength path or light path or channel (all three are used synonymously), reducing unnecessary blocking and improving efficiency.   This two-step process allocates a channel when the request is being served. This single slot advance reservation (SSAR). SSAR also simplifies control as detailed later on.   The patent is available for non-exclusive license.

Advantage:
• Efficient scheduling
• Allows for transmission of large data sets

Application:
Computer networking, data transmission, broadband communications

References:
Dynamic Advance Reservation with Delayed Allocation over Wavelength-Routed Networks; Somani, A., et al. ICTON 2011.

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:11:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210583945Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:11:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Dynamic Advance Reservation with Delayed Allocation over Wavelength-Routed Networks; Somani, A., et al. ICTON 2011.]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Dynamic Advance Reservation with Delayed AllocationUtilityUnited States8,902,92013/533,3556/26/201212/2/20146/26/203212/7/20158/25/2017FalseManufacturing Method of Photonic Crystalhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21057Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method of manufacturing 3D photonic band gap crystals with superior properties.  Such a crystal manipulates light within a particular range of wavelengths which could be applied to a number of optical devices including but not limited to waveguides, solar cells, thermophotovoltaics, and telecommunication applications.

Description:
Polymeric molds of the layer-by-layer photonic crystal can be economically synthesized with a microtransfer molding technique. The refractive indices of these molds are imorived when conformally coated with higher-index materials to allow formation of a photonic bandgap.  The conformal coating of the molds has been demonstrated with a titania-coated polyurethane molds.  These conformational coatings improve the optical contrast in low-refractive-index photonic crystals such as submirometer-scale structures generated by micro transfer molds.

Advantage:
• Improves performance of photonic crystals
• Allows for use of thinner molds and higher index coatings

Application:
Photonics, microtransfer molding, polymeric materials

References:
Photonic bandgaps of conformally coated structures J. Opt. Soc. Am. B/Vol. 22, No. 12/December 2005

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:07:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210573738Mon, 07 Dec 2015 15:08:18 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Photonic bandgaps of conformally coated structures J. Opt. Soc. Am. B/Vol. 22, No. 12/December 2005]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMethod for Testing Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits Using Dynamic Element Matching for Source Linearizationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21055Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a procedure for testing analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits in either production or built-in self-test mode that is more cost effective or practical than existing approaches.  Method of designing integrated circuits incorporating BIST circuits that embed the testing procedures on chip to use performance feedback to adapt the performance of the circuit to meet desired specifications.

Description:
The method includes generating an excitation signal for testing by using dynamic element matching for performance enhancement of the test signal generator that applies an excitation, and/or by measuring an output of the device under test using dynamic element matching for performance enhancement of an output measurement device.

Advantage:
• Improved yield
• Enhanced performance
• Reduced die area
• Reduced or eliminated production testing requirement

Application:
Quality control in an electronics manufacturing environment

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:58:26 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210553055Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:58:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Quality control in an electronics manufacturing environmentStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for Testing Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits Using Dynamic Element Matching for Source LinearizationUtilityUnited States7,587,64710/909,1057/30/20049/8/200912/19/202712/7/20155/24/2017FalseLow Temperature Upgrading and Stabilization of Lignin-derived Phenolic Oligomers in Bio-Oilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21054Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for upgrading of reactive bio-oil without excess char production or fouling of catalysts.

Description:
Bio-oils from pyrolysis operations are complex mixtures of reactive chemicals, and resist techniques conventionally used in the petrochemical refining industry to upgrade crude oil products. The high reactivity of the bio-oil is due to an abundance of unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds as well as a prevalence of carbonyl groups. These tend to react with one another when exposed to high temperatures and active catalysts, resulting in polymerization of the bio-oil compounds into moderate molecular weight polymers that are of little use to the transportation fuel industry.  In this respect, the bio-oils tend to behave in a fashion similar to vegetable oils, which also tend to have some level of unsaturated carbon bonds and carbonyl groups. Hydrogenation of vegetable oils tends to be performed at much lower temperatures and pressures than do the alkene molecules in crude oil.
Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for the successful hydrogenation of the phenolic-based molecules of bio-oil to prepare them for further processing using more standard petrochemical reactions. The reaction conditions used for this upgrading are at low temperatures and pressures.  Mass yields using this process were as high as 99%.

Advantage:
• Enables bio-oil to be used as a drop-in substitute for petrochemical processing
• Milder conditions – lower temperature and pressure reduce operating expenses

Application:
Renewable Transportation fuels; renewable chemical processing

References:
1. M.R. Rover et al., “Stabilization of bio-oils using low temperature, low pressure hydrogenation”, Fuel, 153, pp. 224-230, 2015. 

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0291892

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:53:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210544214Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:58:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for the successful hydrogenation of the phenolic-based molecules of bio-oil to prepare them for further processing using more standard petrochemical reactions. The reaction conditions used for this upgrading are at low temperatures and pressures.  Mass yields using this process were as high as 99%.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. M.R. Rover et al., “Stabilization of bio-oils using low temperature, low pressure hydrogenation”, Fuel, 153, pp. 224-230, 2015. 

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0291892

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseStructurally Integrated Chemical and Biological Sensorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21040Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a structural integration of components including a photodetector, a long-pass filter, an excitation source and a sensing element to detect and quantify analytes.  These analytes are of prime interest in medical, biochemical, analytical chemical, occupational safety, microelectronics, environmental, military and forensics applications.

Description:
This invention is an innovative structural integration of photoluminescence (PL)-based chemical and biological sensors, which results in very compact, field-deployable devices. The structurally integrated components include the photodetector (PD) and a long-pass filter, the excitation source, and the sensing element. The PD and filter are based on thin films of hydrogenated amorphous Si and its alloys, the light source is an organic light emitting device (OLED), and the sensing element is based on thin films or solutions in microfluidic channels or wells.

Advantage:
• Very compact, field deployable sensor
• Complete integration yields robust and inexpensive sensors for a variety of chemical and biological analytes
• Enhances other sensor attributes, such as detection sensitivity and response time
• Using OLEDs reduces heat consumption and dissipation

Application:
Detection and quantification of analytes

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:08:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210403140Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:10:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Detection and quantification of analytesStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Integrated Thin-film Sensors and MethodsUtilityUnited States7,718,13011/401,2744/11/20065/18/20103/18/202912/7/20158/25/2017False3D Shape Measurement with Binary Dithered Patternshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21038Summary:
Construction technique for construction of high quality 3-D images

Description:
Iowa State University Researchers have developed a binary defocusing technique for three-dimensional (3D) shape measurement.   The technique produces H:igh quality sinusoidal patterns by using a technique currently used in digital signal processing.  This image processing method uses dithering (half-toning) to produce high-quality 3D images.  A projector creates the image and the fringe patterns are captured using an imaging device.   Fringe analysis and optimization is then used to reconstruct the 3D shape of the object.  The phase error is less than 0.6% even when the fringe stripes are wide and the projector is nearly focused.

Advantage:
• Simple to implement
• Enables pixel-level resolution
• Relatively high speed

Application:
3-D Imaging

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3674: Hybrid Model for 3D Shape Measurement, and ISURF 3821: 3-D Shape Compression Using Holoimage, and ISURF 4000: 3D Range Data Compression with Computer Graphics Tools, and ISURF 4168: Absolute Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Using Coded Fringe Patterns Without Phase Unwrapping or Projector Calibration

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 12:42:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210384024Mon, 07 Dec 2015 12:50:55 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 3674: Hybrid Model for 3D Shape Measurement, and ISURF 3821: 3-D Shape Compression Using Holoimage, and ISURF 4000: 3D Range Data Compression with Computer Graphics Tools, and ISURF 4168: Absolute Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Using Coded Fringe Patterns Without Phase Unwrapping or Projector Calibration

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-47403D Shape Measurement Using DitheringUtilityUnited States8,929,64413/732,5481/2/20131/6/20157/28/203312/7/20155/24/2017FalseDroplet Actuator and Methods of Droplet Manipulationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21034Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a portable system to perform droplet operations such as transport, mixing, merging, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets. The system uses two electrical motors to tilt a planar platform at pre-specified angles, thereby allowing multiple droplets to move in pre-decided patterns.

Description:
The invention is a portable system to perform droplet manipulations such as transport, mixing, dispensing, and particle separation from liquid droplets.  The novelty is in the methods of moving droplets using gravitational force and mechanical jerks.  The design of hydrophilic patterns, along with the gravitational and mechanical tilting of the platform, help move the droplets.  The utility of this invention is the ease of use and low-cost compared to the existing technology being used today.  This system can help automate a diverse range of applications in molecular diagnostics of physiological samples.

Advantage:
• Portable, cost efficient design compared to currently available automated liquid handling systems
• Uses mechanical jerks and gravity to move droplets vs. current systems which use high electrical voltages, laser beams or vibrations from sound generating devices
• Utilizes unique techniques of printing patterns of specific shapes and sizes on a low-cost transparency film that has been treated to provide hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas

Application:
Immunology, protein chemistry, biomarker identification and molecular diagnosis of physiological samples

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210344313Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:08 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMiniaturized Continuous - Flow Wineryhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21027Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a miniature continuous-flow winery with immobilized yeast cells, mass transport via porous membranes, in-line alcohol sensing and temperature control.

Description:
Today, wine is typically produced in large batches, with volumes 10-100,000 liters. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 2 weeks, and the remaining winemaking operations occur within weeks to months. Yeast cells are dispersed in the juice. Monitoring of fermentation and production is done by sampling.

This invention uses a continuous flow rather than a batch approach. Volumes of wine produced are on the order of 1 mL per unit. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 3-4 days. The yeast is not dispersed in the juice but separated from the juice by a porous hydrophilic membrane, and from the ambient air by a hydrophobic membrane. Inline electrical impedance sensing monitors the alcohol content. A miniature alcohol sensor and temperature control are integrated in the microwinery.

Advantage:
• Better and more precise screening of optimum winemaking temperature, with enhanced control of temperature
• Simpler and higher throughput screening of yeast type since no sedimentation or clarification is required
• In-line sensing is faster and more convenient than sensing by sampling
• Scale-up of output does not require the redesign of operating conditions.  Microwineries are cheap and easily duplicated
• Unprecedented control of fermentation and temperature allows the making of wines that have never been made.

Application:
Wine making and testing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210274358Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

This invention uses a continuous flow rather than a batch approach. Volumes of wine produced are on the order of 1 mL per unit. Alcoholic fermentation occurs within 3-4 days. The yeast is not dispersed in the juice but separated from the juice by a porous hydrophilic membrane, and from the ambient air by a hydrophobic membrane. Inline electrical impedance sensing monitors the alcohol content. A miniature alcohol sensor and temperature control are integrated in the microwinery.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractanthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21024Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:57:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210244391Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:57:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProcedure for concentrating rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets for efficient recyclinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20983Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process combining simple and environmentally-friendly chemical reactions with mechanical steps to enrich rare earth elements from neodymium iron boride magnet scrap for improved recycling.

Description:
Neodymium iron boride magnets are used in a variety of applications which require high energy density, most notably in clean energy solutions (generators and traction motors).  A variety of methods are available for recycling spent magnets, including pyrometallurgy and liquid extraction using organophospates.  While effective, these methods can have high energy costs and utilize extremely hazardous chemicals, making NdFeB recycling less attractive.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

Advantage:
• Minimal capital investment required
• Environmentally friendly
• Effective for other rare-earth iron containing compounds

Application:
Rare earth magnet recycling

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209834293Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:12:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth magnet recyclingStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseChemical Separation of Terbium Oxidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20985Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive and environmentally-friendly method to separate terbium oxide from other trivalent rare earth oxides.

Description:
According to the recent U.S. Department of Energy report “Critical Materials Strategy”, terbium ranks amongst the five most critical rare earth elements (along with dysprosium, neodymium, europium and yttrium).  Unfortunately, these heavy rare earth elements can be difficult to separate from one another because of their chemical similarity.  Current separation methods contain multistage processes which often utilize hazardous reagents, resulting in high capital and operating costs to obtain these important elements.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

Advantage:
• Effective separation of Tb4O7 from other heavy rare earth element oxides (greater than 99.5% purity)
• Environmentally friendly – water based with no hazardous chemicals
• Cost effective – readily sourced and disposed of mild acids, minimal number of stages reduces capital costs
• Fast reaction rate

Application:
Recycling and purification of terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other sources

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:03 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209854351Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseClosed Loop 3D Printinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20757Description:
Currently, 3D printing, and in particular fused deposition modeling (FDM), employ constant extrusion temperature and head velocity.  It is important to note that the level of control currently available in FDM is similar to that in other 3D printing techniques, such as laser sintering, and thus the concept of closed loop control detailed here is applicable to other methods.  Because the processing parameters remain constant, there is limited control of the interfacial healing.  In order to control part quality of 3D printed parts, we suggest to vary the temperature of the extruder filament by using a secondary heat source. In more detail, while the temperature of the die is set to a relatively low point, an infrared heating source is used to heat the filament to the optimum temperature to enhance welding of the filament to substrate.

Advantage:
• Varies the temperature of an extruder filament of a 3D printing system to control part quality
• Automatically heats the filament to a temperature based upon the substrate temperature
• Substrate temperature is determined by model and/or thermal imaging device
• Provides an additional heating element to preheat the substrate to an ideal welding temperature
• Improves part quality and consistency in terms of strength and dimensions

Application:
3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling and laser sintering

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207574410Tue, 10 Nov 2015 08:18:52 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:]]>Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDual-Color Auto-Calibration Scanning-Angle Evanescent Field Microscopehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19664Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new microscope that can be used for live cell imaging as well as for examining single molecule dynamics.

Description:
Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is a mode of fluorescence microscopy that has been widely used for live-cell imaging at the interface between a biological sample and a cover slip or tissue culture well.  TIRFM is based on the induction of an evanescent wave in the liquid adjacent to the interface, which is created when reflected light penetrates the interface, propagates parallel to the surface of the plane of incidence, and decays exponentially with distance.  There are two basic TIRFM systems: prism-based and objective based.  Prism-based systems are preferable since they have lower costs, wider range of incident angles, less excitation light scattering, and higher accuracy in the incident angle determination.  However, the prism-based method has geographical constraints on sample manipulation–it is difficult to recalibrate the system manually for all incident angles–and because image reconstruction can be difficult.   To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an innovative dual-color auto-calibration scanning-angle evanescent field microscope that is easier to operate and more reproducible than existing approaches.  This microscope has utility for live-cell imaging to examine cellular organization and dynamic processes that occur in the  cell/ substrate contact regions.  A computer-controlled automatic high-precision calibration procedure is used to find the incident angles in the full range, and this microscope is able to achieve better axial resolution than currently available systems.

Advantage:
• Permits high axial resolution (5-10 nm)
• Provides quick and automatic creation of an evanescent field for any incident angle in the full range
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Allows rapid re-calibration of new samples
• Enables fine adjustment of the optical trapping forces created by the evanescent field

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The new microscope with an automatic high-precision calibration procedure has been tested under laboratory conditions and is available for demonstration. The entire auto calibration procedure was demonstrated to be complete within minutes and incident angles in the full range (from subcritical angles to nearly 90º) with intervals as small as 0.02º were identified.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196643750Tue, 03 Nov 2015 13:20:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Auto-calibrated Scanning-angle Prism-type Total Internal Reflection Microscopy for Nanometer-precision Axial Position Determination and Optional Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo Total Internal Reflection MicroscopyUtilityUnited States9,012,87213/006,7391/14/20114/21/201512/25/20316/1/20152/27/2017FalseComputer-Aided Tap Tester (CATT) for Inspection of Composite and Metal Honeycomb Structureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19491Description:
This technology is an instrumented tap test system that provides quantitative, image-based data regarding the mechanical properties of an inspection area. Driven by a laptop PC, the system produces two dimensional images (or "C-scans") that reveal flaws, damages, repairs and substructures in complex bonded structures such as metal honeycomb sandwiches and composite structures. It produces images of the local stiffness of the component, and the stiffness derived from the tap test was shown to agree with that obtained by static load tests. The instrument generates images that reveal the percent reduction in stiffness due to flaws or damage. It has utility in safety inspections for airlines and other industries, as well as application in quality assurance during fabrication.

Advantage:
• Image-based results - improves on earlier tap test methods and instruments that do not have imaging capability.
• Cost-effective.
• Quantitative stiffness data that are structurally meaningful.
• Simple operation with minimal training - no calibration standards required and test results independent of operator.
• High portability - driven by a laptop PC without need of external AC power.
• Manual and mechanized data collection.

Application:
1. Non-destructive testing and inspection of manufacturing-related or service-induced defects, flaws and damages in composite and metal honeycomb structures. 2. Aircraft manufacturers, composite components manufacturers and users, nondestructive instrumentation manufacturers 3. Safety inspections for airlines and other industries; quality control during fabrication of composite structures.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Advanced prototype is complete and available for demonstration. The prototype is expected to require very little development to be brought to market. The manual version had gone through field tests at three airlines and three military bases, and the system is undergoing beta-site tests at American Airlines in Tulsa, OK. The mechanized version is being completed and has also gone through some field tests.

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194912592Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:54:13 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Non-Destructive Inspections and the Display of Inspection ResultsUtilityUnited States6,327,92109/517,9573/3/200012/11/20013/3/20205/19/20155/19/2015FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Fri, 18 Sep 2015 09:16:37 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBandwidth Recycling for More Efficient Data Transmissionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19267Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed scheduling algorithms to employ unused bandwidth to improve broadband network efficiency.

Description:
The explosion in the use of the Internet and the need to transfer multimedia data has lead to increasing requirements being placed on communications networks.  Bandwidth, which can be a limited and valuable resource, must be managed efficiently to provide high quality services to users (QoS).  A variety of approaches have been used to meet the demands for QoS while simultaneously providing diversified traffic services, including reservation protocols, traffic shaping, scheduling algorithms, and congestion avoidance.  However, most of these approaches require predicting the amount of incoming traffic, which is difficult to do since video streaming, VoIP, etc. generate data at variable rates. To provide a high QoS, subscriber stations are required to request the needed bandwidth from base stations prior to any transmission of data; subscriber stations often keep reserved bandwidth—even when it is more than the data transmitted—and thus some bandwidth may be wasted.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a network protocol to employ unused bandwidth to improve network efficiency through bandwidth recycling.  This approach utilizes scheduling algorithms to increase the probability of successful recycling.  Since bandwidth recycling does not change the existing bandwidth reservation, it maintains the QoS guarantee and does not introduce any extra delay in data transmission.  In addition, simulation results have demonstrated the potential for bandwidth recycling to improve network throughput by 40%. This technology has utility for any 4G broadband wireless network.

Advantage:
• Accurate (obviates the need for traffic prediction)
• Efficient (wasted bandwidth can be utilized immediately to improve network throughput)
• Economical (bandwidth recycling introduces limited overhead)
• Versatile (enhances QoS for both WiMax and LTE networks)

Application:
Communications networks

References:
1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Simulation results demonstrate that bandwidth recycling can improve network throughput by 40% and decrease data latency, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 14:16:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192673804Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:48:42 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Bandwidth Recycling in NetworksUtilityUnited States8,737,42913/084,7044/12/20115/27/201411/1/20325/7/20158/25/2017FalseInterferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switchinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19138Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an optical switch capable of submicrosecond switching that may help meet the growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications.

Description:
Demand for optical data and communication networks continues to grow, and as a consequence, so does the need for high speed, high bandwidth switching technologies.  The development of all optical switching technologies has seen increased focus to help meet performance demands and the need for ultrafast signal processing. Magneto-optical switches have been investigated for optical switching applications because of their low insertion loss and ability to be integrated into optical systems.  However, magneto-optical switches have previously had slow switching times, on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an interferometric fiber switch which utilizes a magneto-optic Faraday rotator (MOFR). This system uses generation of a magnetic field via a magnetic pulse circuit to achieve high speed switching, on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. As a consequence, this optical switch may have utility for applications such as fiber-optic communications.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

Advantage:
• High speed (capable of switching speeds on the order of 100 ns)
• High stability (Sagnac configuration allows short path length and matched interferometric paths)
• Versatile (switch may either have a latching or nonlatching configuration)

Application:
Fiber optics communications; high capacity data networks

References:
“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

 

Stage0.png

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:22 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191383977Tue, 18 Aug 2015 13:43:45 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Current-controlled, high-speed magneto-optical switching”, Kemmet, S., M. Mina, and R. J. Weber. 2010. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics 6:1829-1831.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Advanced Drive Circuitry for Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States9,110,31713/440,3554/5/20128/18/20153/1/20348/18/20152/27/2017FalseStanding Wave Axial Nanometry (SWAN) for Superresolution Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19669Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have an approach for performing 3-D measurements of single molecules with nanometer accuracy and precision.

Description:
Despite its importance as a research tool for understanding cellular functions, the optical resolution of light microscopy has imposed limitations on observing and measuring cellular components and structures. The advent of superresolution microscopy techniques, which enable imaging of nanostructures and processes at X-Y resolutions of approximately 20 nm, opens new opportunities for exploring cell biology and has many other applications.  However, current superresolution microscopy approaches may have limitations with respect to whether live or fixed cells can be imaged because of image acquisition and processing speed, and may also have limitations in terms of resolution along the Z axis.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new technique call SWAN (standing wave axial nanometry) for determining the axial location of nanoscale fluorescent objects with sub-nanometer accuracy and several nanometer precision.  Unlike other approaches, SWAN does not require custom optics or specially engineered substrates, which makes it easy to use with biological samples and live cells. SWAN can be easily integrated with other super-resolution and super-accuracy techniques to image with nanometer resolution along the lateral and axial directions.  As a consequence, this approach has broad utility for a variety of applications, such as life science research (e.g., biomolecular interactions, structure-function studies, cell imaging), drug discovery (e.g., direct observation of targeted drug delivery and drug interactions in vitro and in living cells and tissues), nanotechnology (e.g., characterization of nanoscale materials), material science (characterization of materials with novel optical properties), and optical MEMs devices by improving their efficiency through more accurate and precise imaging.

Advantage:
• Can be used with biological materials and living cells
• Extends working range
• Enables imaging with nanometer resolution along lateral and axial directions
• Does not require custom optics
• Can be used for single molecule AFM force measurement

Application:
Imaging for life sciences research, drug discovery, nanotechnology, materials science and optical MEMS devices.

References:
“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Proof-of-concept and utility has been demonstrated by using SWAN to measure the orientation of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths that were tethered to surfaces with different functionalities.  Commercialization partners are being sought for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196694045Wed, 12 Aug 2015 07:52:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision”, Li, H., C. F. Yen, and S. Sivasankar. 2012. Nano Lett. 12:3731-3735.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and PrecisionUtilityUnited States9,103,78414/081,52211/15/20138/11/201511/15/20338/12/20152/27/2017FalsePiezoelectric-Based Vibration Energy Harvesterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19689Summary:
The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.


Description:
A potential means of extending battery life is the use of miniature renewable self-contained power supply units, which can convert ambient vibrations from existing sources in their environment into electrical form, and use this harvested energy to supplement batteries and/or other energy storage elements.  This invention employs a unique nonlinear, self-tuning, bistable vibration energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from broadband and varying-amplitude sources, combined with synchronized energy extraction circuits using electronic breaker switches for efficient harvesting.

Advantage:
• Extends battery life by effectively converting ambient vibrations into electrical energy
• Combines nonlinear bistable transduction with synchronized extraction
• Piezoelectric harvester with a simple micro-engineered design allowing a variety of material choices for ease of implementation
• ~100X increased harvested power, especially for broadband variations, compared to other harvesters using the same input, due to bistable transduction and synchronized extraction
• Presents a completely mechanical, zero-energy-cost method to increase range of excitation amplitudes over which the system remains bistable, further doubling the efficiency over varying amplitude excitations
• Presents for the first time an accurate mathematical model for a bistable transducer by augmenting the Butterworth van Dyke piezoelectric model to capture external magnetic forces

Application:
Remote sensors that can harvest ambient mechanical vibrations/energy to extend their battery life.

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196894354Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:25:52 GMTSummary:The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUse of Flexible Capacitive Strain Gauges in Tireshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19683Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have utilized soft, flexible capacitive strain gauges to report real-time changes in tire shape.  This information can provide information regarding tire slip, changes in driving surface and structural health of the tire.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the use of pliant capacitive strain sensors to monitor flexure in automotive tires.  The strain sensors, previously patented by MIT (U.S. Patent 8,384,398), are inexpensive to manufacture, responsive to small amounts of strain, and can easily be deployed around the entire interior circumference of the tire.  Information from the sensors could be used to monitor the structural health of the tire, terrain conditions, tire slip, over-inflation, loss of contact with the driving surface, and more.  Feedback can inform the driver of imminent failure and deteriorating road conditions, with application in personal, commercial and industrial vehicles.

Advantage:
• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall
• Sensitive to small amounts of stress

Application:
Tire monitoring to enhance the safety and controllability of vehicles

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196834124Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:25:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Flexible strain sensors minimize flexure mismatch with tire wall]]>• Sensitive to small amounts of stress]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePreventing Hot Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jets via Flow-Aligned Blockershttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19256Summary:
A more effective design for turbine cooling.

Description:
Film cooling is a widely used method to protect materials exposed to hot gases whose temperatures may exceed the melting temperature of the materials, for example in gas turbine engines used in aerospace and power generation.  Film cooling protects the material by injecting a layer of cooler air to insulate the material surface from the hot gas; however, it can be inefficient because film-cooling jets can lift off from the material surface that they are intended to protect and draw in or entrain hot gases underneath them.  As a result, the effectiveness of film-cooling jets can be greatly reduced just a short distance from where they are located.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have develop a new design for preventing hot gas ingestion by film-cooling jets using flow-aligned blockers.  This design—which incorporates ridges on either side of the film cooling jet—results in only the cooler air or gases being entrained beneath the film-cooling jet as it lifts off.  Consequently, film cooling can be accomplished with much less cooling flow, increasing the efficiency of turbine engines.

Advantage:
• Film cooling is increased to a distance of 15 diameters downstream of the film-cooling jet injection hole when the flow-aligned blockers are present compared to 2 diameters when they are not.
• Enables film-cooling jets to be highly effective over a range of blowing ratios, including those at which lift-off takes place, and can extend the service life of turbine engines.

Application:
Gas turbine cooling, Film cooling

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3458: Momentum Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped Holes

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192563361Tue, 02 Jun 2015 07:39:27 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Group:ISURF #3458: Momentum Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped Holes

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Preventing Hot-Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jet via Flow-Aligned BlockersUtilityUnited States8,066,47811/975,01210/17/200711/29/20117/22/20305/7/20158/25/2015FalseMomentum-Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped Holeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19259Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new shape-hole design concept to enable more effective film-cooling for gas turbine engines and other applications.

Description:
Film cooling is a widely used method to protect materials exposed to hot gases whose temperatures may exceed the melting temperature of the materials, for example in gas turbine engines used in aerospace and power generation.  Film cooling protects the material by injecting a layer of cooler air to insulate the material surface from the hot gas; however, it can be inefficient because film-cooling jets can lift off from the material surface that they are intended to protect and draw in or entrain hot gases underneath them.  In addition, film-cooling can increase drag.  Previous efforts to improve the effectiveness of film cooling include shaping the hole near its exit, using slots instead of circular holes, placing tabs at the exit of holes, indenting a region around the film cooling hole, and using compound angles.  However, these efforts may not enable sufficient cooling to satisfy the increasingly higher inlet temperatures desired for maximum efficiency of gas turbine engines or may result in an unacceptable increase in drag.  For example, while previous shaped hole designs have lead to an increase lateral spreading, downstream penetration of the coolant was reduced because the expanding cross-sectional area decreased the momentum of the cooling flow.  To overcome these deficiencies, ISU researchers have developed a new film-cooling shaped hole design that preserves momentum for greater lateral and streamwise coverage.  As a result, significant improvement in film-cooling effectiveness especially at low blowing ratios is observed.

Advantage:
• Keeps the film-cooling flow cross-sectional area nearly constant so that momentum can be preserved to increase both lateral and streamwise coverage of the film-cooling jet.

Application:
Turbine cooling; film cooling

References:
Conference proceedings: “Momentum-Preserving Shaped Holes for Film Cooling”, T. I-P. Shih and S. Na, 54th ASME Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Technical Congress, Exposition, and User Symposium, May14-17, 2006, Montreal, Canada

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3361: Preventing Hot Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jets via Flow-Aligned Blockers

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192593458Tue, 02 Jun 2015 07:38:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Momentum-Preserving Shaped Holes for Film Cooling”, T. I-P. Shih and S. Na, 54th ASME Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Technical Congress, Exposition, and User Symposium, May14-17, 2006, Montreal, Canada

]]>Group:ISURF #3361: Preventing Hot Gas Ingestion by Film-Cooling Jets via Flow-Aligned Blockers

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Momentum Preserving Film-Cooling Shaped HolesUtilityUnited States7,997,86711/975,06410/17/20078/16/20116/16/20305/7/20155/7/2015FalseAn All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19292Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an optical on-off switch that can meet the fast switching demands required by high speed communications systems.

Description:
Fiber-based networks have been used to meet demand for ever increasing bandwidth, and fast switching is required to fully utilize the available bandwidth of the fiber. A variety of switching technologies have been developed to try and achieve fast and reliable switching, including optical micromechanical systems (MEMS)-based switching using silicon technologies, thermal optical switching, electro-optic switching, and acousto-optic switching. However, MEMs and thermo-optic switches suffer from slow (millisecond) switching times, while electro-optic switches have fast (nanosecond) switching times, but suffer from high insertion losses (~ 9 dB). Acousto-optic switches have microsecond switching times, but have insertion losses on the order of 6 dB. To overcome these disadvantages, ISU researchers have developed an all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch based on Faraday rotation of polarized light as it passes through a magneto-optical material. This switch has been demonstrated to have a switching time of 2 microseconds and an insertion loss of 4.8 dB. Because the required external magnetic field is low, the switch also has a simple design and be constructed using a fast solenoid for the drive circuit and a single magneto-optic block as the Faraday rotator

Advantage:
• Eliminates optical-electronic-optical conversions 
• Decreases switching time compared to MEMs and thermo-optic switches
• Reduces material costs through simple design

Application:
Fiber optic communications; data networks

References:
Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
An all fiber magneto-optical switch has been designed and demonstrated to have a switching time of about 2 microseconds.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 12:24:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192923192Tue, 02 Jun 2015 07:30:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings: “A novel all fiber magneto-optic on-off switch”, Rashmi Bahuguna, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2005, Proc. SPIE 5907:590702]]>Group:ISURF #3654: Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotation and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,555,17711/733,8554/11/20076/30/20096/30/20175/8/20158/15/2017An All Fiber Magneto-Optic On-Off Switch for Networking ApplicationsCIPUnited States7,916,98212/112,2664/30/20083/29/201112/27/20275/8/20156/2/2017FalseNovel Catalysts for Isomerization of Glucose to Fructosehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19680Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed novel catalysts from commercial organic bases that can be used for economical, rapid, and efficient conversion of glucose to fructose for the food and chemicals industries.

Description:
High fructose corn syrup, an important component of a variety of food products, is predominately produced through the enzymatic isomerization of glucose.  While the commercially used enzyme has high yield and selectivity, its turnover rate is very low.  Recent advancements in utilizing tin-impregnated zeolites as catalysts have shown potential for high yield, selectivity and catalytic rate, but have not demonstrated long term stability in hydrothermal reaction environments.  In order to address these issues, ISU researchers have developed a hydrothermally stable carbon-based catalyst that incorporates Brønsted base moieties that have been shown to have comparable performance to the Sn/Beta catalysts in terms of rate, yield and selectivity.  Moreover, these carbon-based catalysts have been successfully tethered to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, resulting in a hydrothermally-stable, heterogeneous catalyst for glucose isomerization reactions.

Advantage:
• Hydrothermally stable
• High yield and fast reaction times
• Cost effective compared to Tin-Beta and solid Brønsted base catalysts

Application:
Brønsted base catalysts for the conversion of glucose to high fructose corn syrup

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
The catalysts have been demonstrated to convert glucose to fructose with a yield of 31% under mild reaction conditions

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196804175Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Hydrothermally stable]]>• High yield and fast reaction times]]>• Cost effective compared to Tin-Beta and solid Brønsted base catalysts]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProduction of Low-Cost Carbon Catalyst Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19679Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple, one-step method for producing carbon materials containing multiple, stable catalytic sites that has utility for the production of low-cost heterogeneous catalysts.

Description:
Homogeneous acid catalysts are commonly used for the production of industrially important chemicals.  However, despite their low material costs, homogeneous catalysts add cost to the process because of the expense associated with separation, recycling and treatment of the waste sulfuric acid. To address these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a low-cost method for the creation of compounds consisting of a carbon backbone with covalently-bonded acid or base groups that have utility as hydrothermally stable carbon catalyst materials.  For example, these materials could be used as strong acid heterogeneous catalysts for reactors operating under hydrothermal conditions, which is important for reactions involving biological feedstocks.  In addition, the technology enables incorporation of a wide variety of functional groups into carbon materials by simply changing the bifunctional reactant.  This technology may also have application in areas such as electrochemistry and electronics since the functional groups can coordinate metal cations, useful for synthesis of nano-composite materials with a range of metals and metal combinations or used as colloidal materials.

Advantage:
• Low cost and simple chemistry
• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions
• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios

Application:
Heterogeneous catalysts

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
This method has been used for the synthesis of nano-composite materials with ferro magnetic particles with very high (40%) metal loadings that can subsequently be dispersed into thin films.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196794178Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Low cost and simple chemistry]]>• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions]]>• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Method for Wide Field-View Imaginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19662Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has developed a compact device that enables very wide field of view imaging and may lay the foundation for artificial eyes that mimic those of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod.

Description:
Imaging devices with very wide field-of-view (FOV) have many potential applications, including endoscopes for biomedical applications, robotics and automation, and in security and assistive technologies.  For many of these applications, having a light weight, compact device is highly desirable.  However, many wide FOV devices that have been developed are based on conventional optics and tend to be bulky and heavy.  Other development efforts have focused on mimicking solutions found in nature such as artificial compound eyes found in insects and crustaceans.  However, the realization of biomimetic artificial eyes has not been entirely successful due to the difficulty in assembling the compound eye’s vision units hemispherically as well as the difficulty in optically connecting the curved optical front-end (i.e., the microlenses, spacers and incidence angle-discriminating elements) to a flat detector array.  To overcome these obstacles, an ISU researcher has developed a MEMS (micro-electrical-mechanical systems) imaging system that mimics the compound eye of a shrimp-like deep-sea amphipod which uses polymer fibers to provide flexible optical connections between the microlenses and photodetectors.  In addition to providing a hemispherical imaging of panoramic objects, this system has the potential to enable dynamically tunable FOV and is fabricated using soft lithographic replica-molding techniques amenable to mass production.  As a consequence, this imaging system may be useful for a wide variety of applications, including biomedical instrumentation, surveillance, and assistive devices.

Advantage:
• Simpler fabrication
• Multi-functionality
• Dynamic control of the field-of-view

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A membrane with a “fibers in a chamber” structure has been fabricated and shown to respond well to both inflation and deflation actuations; in addition, HeNe beams passed through the fibers have shown that they function as waveguides, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196623788Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:43:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Elastomeric Device for Tunable ImagingUtilityUnited States8,351,10613/180,6687/12/20111/8/20137/12/20316/1/20152/27/2017FalseConcentric Coplanar and Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Non-Destructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19660Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed concentric coplanar and arc-Electrode capacitive sensors with applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered dielectric structures.

Description:
With advanced composites being used in aircraft, vehicles, and shipbuilding, demand for dielectric measurements has been increasing in recent years, as these types of measurements can be used to characterize a wide variety of materials, including thin films, substrates, circuit boards, semisolids, etc.  Capacitance methods have been used to characterize materials because of their simplicity, high accuracy, and relatively low cost.  ISU researchers have developed novel concentric coplanar and arc-electrode capacitive sensors that have utility for material characterization and non-destructive evaluation.  The coplanar sensor--   which has the advantage of rotational symmetry-- exhibits a strong measurable outcome capacitance and has various applications, including quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered planar dielectric structures.  For example, the concentric coplanar capacitive sensor could be used to detect water or excessive inhomogeneities caused by repairs in modern radome structures.  The arc-electrode capacitive sensor also exhibits a strong measurable output capacitance, and has applications that include quantitative characterization of material properties of multi-layered cylindrical dielectric structures, such as the wiring found in aircraft.  This technology is available for non-exclusive licensing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Advantage:
• The measurement technique employed for these sensors provides a quantitative relationship between the measurable sensor output capacitance and the material and structural properties of the material under test. Various measurement instruments, handheld capacitive sensors for example, can be developed based on this technology to quantitatively characterize the material and structural properties of multi-layered dielectric materials.

Application:
Non-destructive evaluation; material characterization

References:
T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196603815Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:43:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:T. Chen and N. Bowler, Analysis of a Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor for Nondestructive Evaluation of Multi-layered Dielectric Structures, IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 17, 1307-1318, 2010.


T. Chen, N. Bowler, and J. Bowler, Analysis of Arc-Electrode Capacitive Sensors for Characterization of Dielectric Cylindrical Rods, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 61, 233-240, 2012.]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor System With Quantitative ModelUtilityUnited States8,791,70713/185,1567/18/20117/29/20148/19/20326/1/20158/4/2017FalseChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabricshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19263Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed ChainMap, an algorithm that optimally maps logic chains used in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) to improve their performance

Description:
Look-up table (LUT)-based FPGA have typically been used in prototyping rather than as critical design elements.  However, performance improvements have advanced FPGAs to being valuable in development of end-components.  An important dedicated structure found in currently available architectures is the arithmetic carry chain.  However, in designs that incorporate limited arithmetic operations and contain a carry-select style architecture, the carry chain is an under utilized resource.  To overcome this deficiency, ISU researchers have developed a novel algorithm, ChainMap, for depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in reconfigurable fabrics.  ChainMap establishes a difference between programmable routing connections and chain connections, and optimally identifies them without requiring the use of a user-specified hardware description language (HDL).  In addition, ChainMap allows the use of non-arithmetic as well as arithmetic chains. As a result, significant performance gains are achievable for all designs and design flow is freer.

Advantage:
• Effective (experimental results indicate that ChainMap improves performance up to 40% compared to HDL methods)
• Efficient (allows the use of non-arithmetic operations and does not require the preservation of HDL macros through the design flow)
• Flexible (eliminates the need for HDL to create logic chains and frees the design flow)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The algorithm is available for testing

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192633631Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:“Beyond the arithmetic constraint: depth-optimal mapping of logic chains in LUT-based FPGAs”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun Somani, FPGA ’08, February 24-26, Monterrey, CA.

]]>Group:ISURF #3630, Logic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Devices, will also be required for commercial use]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable FabricsUtilityUnited States8,661,39412/236,7819/24/20082/25/20141/16/20325/7/20155/5/2017FalseLogic Element Architecture for Improving Logic Chain Operations in Programmable Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19262Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a logic element architecture that simplifies generic logic chain operations and improves the functionality of each logic element in programmable devices.

Description:
Reconfigurable fabrics are an important element of reconfigurable computing—systems architecture that offer both performance and flexibility for a broad range of applications—and typically depend on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) which contain programmable logic that allows them to be configured by the designer or customer after manufacturing.  However, compared with application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC), FPGA have lower performance and require increased power consumption.  To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

Advantage:
• Effective (enables carry chain reuse, improving design performance at minimal cost)
• Robust (increases maximum clock frequency by 47% in technology map experiments while reducing utilized routing resources by 13%)
• Efficient (avoids the use of extraneous interconnects since only one wire is needed compared to approaches that require a standard carry chain connection and an additional connection between logic elements)

References:
Conference proceedings: “Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

Group:
A license to related ISURF technology ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The logic element architecture is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192623630Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome some of these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devices.  In contrast to  architectures to support arithmetic operations that are characterized by the computation of two (K-1)-input Boolean functions with identical inputs with one carry chain and one programmable routing output, the generic logic chain architecture supports traditional logic element arithmetic operation as well as allows a single K-input Boolean function to be computed and output to both the carry chain and programmable routing outputs.  This allows both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations to be grouped together as generic logic chain operations and use the full K-input functionality of each logic element.  Since one feature of this logic element is that it makes no distinction between arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, it makes it possible for circuits that contain no arithmetic operations to use the existing carry chain connection for performance improvement.

]]>Advantage:References:“Non-arithmetic carry chains for reconfigurable fabrics”, Michael T. Frederick and Arun K. Somani, 2007, Proceedings of the IEEE 15th International Conference on Computer Design (ICCD), pp. 137-143.

]]>Group:ISURF #3631, ChainMap: Depth-Optimal Mapping of Logic Chains in Reconfigurable Fabrics, will also be required for commercial use.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Logic element architecture for generic logic chains in programmable devicesUtilityUnited States8,438,52212/237,0769/24/20085/7/20133/17/20315/7/20153/6/2017FalseSagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday Rotationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19247Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel fiber-based magneto-optic on-off switch that enables compact, effective, and low cost switching capabilities.

Description:
The growing demand for high speed, high bandwidth applications, such as communication networks and optical data, has resulted in an increasing need for all-optical switching technologies.  However, the capacity that fiber-optic communications offers is limited by the bottleneck caused by electrical-optical conversions in current systems, and electronic switching approaches are not believed to be sufficient to meet future bandwidth demands.  Magneto-optical fiber-based switches have been viewed as promising for use in optical switches because of their low insertion losses and ease of integration into optical systems.  As part of an effort to develop practical magneto-optical fiber-based switches, ISU researchers have recently created a Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation.  This switch can be used to connect or disconnect a transmitter from a fiber optic network instead of turning the transmitter on or off electronically.  Since electronically controlled switching can take hundreds of microseconds, the ISU switch can help overcome switching bottlenecks.  In addition, since this novel fiber-based magneto-optic switch allows users to closer an optical fiber line when needed, it may enable applications that require compact, effective and low cost switching capabilities.  This switch structure can also be integrated to form a complete and cost-effective optical system as part of a photonic integrated circuit.

Advantage:
• Advantage: Rapid (switching times on the order of 100s nanoseconds are possible
• Simple (integration into silicon-based technology is easier than with existing approaches)
• Economical (has lower insertion loss and power consumption, and is less expensive to implement)

References:
1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.

Group:
This technology is related to both ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
A prototype switch is available for testing

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192473654Mon, 01 Jun 2015 08:03:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:1: “Sagnac interferometric switch utilizing Faraday rotation,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, 2009, J. Appl. Phys. 105:07E702); doi:10.1063/1.3058627.

2. “Current-controlled, High-speed Magneto-optic Switching,” Sasha Kemmet, Mani Mina, and Robert J. Weber, Presented at the 11th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, January 18-22, 2010, Washington, DC.]]>Group:ISURF #3192: An All Fiber Magneto-Optical Switch for Networking Applications and

ISURF #3977: Interferometric Methods of Magneto-Optic Optical Switching

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Sagnac Interferometric Switch Utilizing Faraday RotationUtilityUnited States8,478,08212/845,9437/29/20107/2/20136/17/20315/8/20155/5/2017FalseIron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozonehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19432Summary:
Ozone is used commercially for treatment of potable and non-potable water, and as an industrial oxidant. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for using iron in ozone oxidation that significantly improves the speed of oxidation reactions.

Description:
Ozone is recognized as potent and effective oxidizing agent, and has a number of commercial uses, including use as an industrial oxidant and water treatment. Ozone is attractive as an oxidant or a disinfectant because it is one of the most active and readily available oxidants, and because the formation of molecular oxygen as a by-product makes it environmentally friendly. However, ozone is not always as fast or efficient as chemical oxidants, since ozone can degrade during the reaction and cause incomplete oxidation. To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for using iron as an effective catalyst in oxidations mediated by ozone. By reacting iron(II) with ozone, nearly instantaneous and complete oxidation of substrates such as alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, nitriles, sulfides and sulfoxides occurs, making this a particularly useful process for waste water treatment, water purification, and other similar applications.

Advantage:
• Rapid rate of catalysis (oxidation occurs nearly instantaneously)
•Environmentally friendly (ozone naturally decomposes to oxygen, and no toxic halogenated compounds are produced)
• Versatile (may be used for any application and/or substrates for which ozone is used as an oxidant)
• Simple (catalyst is formed in situ using commercially available materials at the point of ozone generation)

Application:
Oxidation of aqueous waste streams, water treatment, food treatment and processing

References:
"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3901: Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Products

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The process is available for demonstration and can be adopted right away. Iowa State University is thus seeking partners for commercialization of this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194323338Mon, 01 Jun 2015 07:48:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

]]>Group:ISURF #3901: Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Products

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Iron Catalysis in Oxidation by OzoneUtilityUnited States7,618,54611/669,4241/31/200711/17/20092/14/20275/14/20157/19/2017FalseCost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19450Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory have developed a cost effective method for producing giant magnetocaloric material Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

Description:
Magnetic refrigeration has promise as an alternative to compressor technology for applications that range from liquefaction of helium to room temperature air conditioning. However, for most magnetic refrigeration applications large amounts (several hundred grams to hundreds of kilograms) of the magnetocaloric materials are needed to obtain sufficient cooling.  Unfortunately, processes for making giant magnetocaloric materials materials has been difficult to scale efficiently and still produce homogenous ingots.  To overcome this limitation, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for utilizing commercially available Gadolinium feedstock for cost effective production of material with improved magneto-caloric properties.  As a consequence, this method may enhance the commercial utility of of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and highly efficient.

Advantage:
• This new method allows for cost effective production of Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).
• The lower cost will dramatically improve the commercial viability of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and efficient.
• No commercial method is currently available to use commercial Gd metal to produce Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.

Application:
Applications exist anywhere there is need for freezing, heating, or cooling. Industries which produce cryogenics systems; supermagnets; and HVAC systems for homes, vehicular transports and other applications will be interested in this technology.

References:
V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the material have been produced.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194502487Fri, 29 May 2015 09:40:03 GMTSummary:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).]]>Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.]]>Application:

]]>References:V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method of Making Active Magnetic Refrigerant Materials Based on Gd-Si-Ge AlloysCIPUnited States7,114,34010/413,4174/14/200310/3/200610/9/20215/15/20155/15/2015FalseNozzle for Fine Particle Productionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19449Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory have developed an improved high pressure gas atomizing nozzle that can be used for the production of metal powders.

Description:
High pressure gas atomizing (HPGA) nozzles have shown promise for applications such as the production of very fine metal and alloy powders.  ISU scientists have now developed an improved HPGA nozzle that enables increased gas kinetic energy to be delivered to the molten material being atomized.  Through its configuration of multiple gas microdischarge openings or passages, the improved HPGA nozzle is able to generate supersonic atomizing gas velocity at lower gas manifold pressure compared to other systems.  As a result, the yield and efficiency of ultra-fine metal powders produced by gas atomization is enhanced.  Finer particle distribution is also achieved since the deviation of the particle size produced is reduced when this nozzle is used.

Advantage:
• Efficient (the ISU HPGA nozzle is better at generating supersonic gas with higher kinetic energy than other HPGA nozzles)
• Effective (particle size distribution is narrow)

Application:
Production of ultra-fine metal powder

References:
“Progress Towards Gas Atomization Processing with Increased Uniformity and Control”, Iver E. Anderson and Robert L. Terpstra, 2002, Mat. Sci. and Eng. A236:101-109.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Extensive gas-flow visualizations using schlieren imaging have demonstrated that the improved HPGA nozzle for fine particle production is more efficient in generating supersonic gas with higher kinetic energy than the gas jets of other HPGA nozzles.  In addition, generation of metal powders with uniform particle density has been demonstrated with the improved HPGA nozzle using stainless steel, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194492168Tue, 26 May 2015 15:13:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Progress Towards Gas Atomization Processing with Increased Uniformity and Control”, Iver E. Anderson and Robert L. Terpstra, 2002, Mat. Sci. and Eng. A236:101-109.

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Atomizing Nozzle and MethodUtilityUnited States6,142,38209/087,4105/29/199811/7/20005/29/20185/15/20155/15/2015FalseCatalyst for Selective Acid Transesterficationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19192Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory are looking for industry partners to commercialize a newly developed bi-functional, heterogeneous catalyst that is designed to expel aqueous byproducts formed during transesterfications reactions.

Description:
The ability to separate functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for recycling has enabled applications of these materials as heterogeneous catalysts in many chemical transformations. However, their sensitivity to hydrolysis and subsequent loss of catalytic performance has reduced the economic benefit potential of MSN catalysts. To address this drawback, Iowa  State  University  and  Ames  Laboratory  researchers  have  developed  an  efficient bifunctional MSN catalyst for esterification reactions. Superior reactivity has been achieved using this catalyst by supplementing the catalytic groups with secondary functionality designed to expel the resulting aqueous by-products, thereby preventing hydrolysis of the silica surface and plugging of the nano-environment. The principle employed in the architecture of this new catalyst makes it suitable for reactions involving dehydration and yields compounds of high purity.

Advantage:
• Robust structure enables multiple recycling
• High purity yields are achieved by efficiently expelling by-products of reaction
• Enhanced reactivity compared to existing commercial catalysts

Application:
acid transesterfication, dehydration reaction

Stage0.png
Development Stage:


Lab trials have been successful

Desc3881.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191923881Tue, 26 May 2015 10:26:56 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:acid transesterfication, dehydration reactionStage0.png

]]>Lab trials have been successfulDesc3881.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica CatalystUtilityUnited States8,993,79313/361,6131/30/20123/31/20153/10/20335/7/20152/27/2017FalseSimple, Efficient and Functional-Group-Tolerant Cross-Coupling Reactions for C-C Bond Formationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19430Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed an improved catalyst system for Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions that requires no ligand, copper, or amine to give good yields (85-95%) and high selectivities at room temperature.

Description:
The use of Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions for preparing a wide variety of highly functionalized or complex molecules has grown tremendously over the past decade. Even though this method for preparing sp2-sp carbon bonds has been one of the mildest and most successful to date, there are still limitations in the range of functional groups that can be tolerated in these synthetic schemes. The subject technology represents a greatly improved process for performing these reactions using a broader range of reaction partners at room temperature.

Advantage:
• Coupling reaction tolerates diverse functional groups (hydroxy, keto, cyano, ester and nitro)
• Room temperature reaction gives excellent yields (85-95%)
• Amine-free reaction conditions produces less treatable waste
• Expensive and sensitive phosphine-ligated Pd are not required
• No dimerization of alkynes due to the absence of Cu(I) co-catalyst

Application:
*Synthesis of new drug candidates (small and large scale reactions) *Combinatorial synthesis for designing new drug candidates *Synthesis of liquid crystals *Preparation of electron conducting organic polymers *Synthesis of molecular “wires” for molecular electronics applications

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
This catalyst system has been shown to work in the laboratory with a variety of aryl halides and terminal alkynes.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194303189Wed, 20 May 2015 06:54:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Palladium-Catalyzed Coupling of Aryl Halides with AlkynesUtilityUnited States7,642,39111/364,8782/28/20061/5/20108/8/20275/14/20159/13/2017FalseLow Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide Superconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19421Description:
Superconductors are materials which carry electrical current without dissipation. However, feeding electrical current into a superconductor generates heat dissipation in the contacts and degrades maximum attainable current value. The degradation in contacts is also different depending on the different chemical nature of the superconducting materials. Iron-pnictide based superconductors have a number of superior properties as compared to other known high temperature superconductors, and due to their high critical magnetic fields, can be competitive alternatives for generating high magnetic fields without loss of resistance.  In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

Advantage:
• Effective (provides low contact surface resistivity of 10-9 W.cm2)
• Economical (utilizes current solder methods with an economical material

Application:
Electrical contact material for superconductors based on iron-pnictides

References:
Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194213707Tue, 19 May 2015 14:21:56 GMTDescription:In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

]]>Advantage:10-9 W.cm2)]]>Application:

]]>References:Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide SuperconductorsUtilityUnited States8,450,24612/931,9992/15/20115/28/20132/15/20315/14/20152/27/2017FalseConversion of Cyclic Amines into Lactams for Synthesis of Nylons and Other Polymershttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19426Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the conversion of cyclic amines into lactams, which may have utility for the production of nylons and other industrial polymers.

Description:
Lactams are used for a wide variety of commercial applications, such as precursors for the production of solvents, nylons, and other polymers.  Caprolactam is a particularly important lactam that is used as a precursor for Nylon-6, of which millions of tons are sold each year.  However, the traditional commercial process for production of caprolactam uses highly corrosive sulfuric acid and generates ammonium sulfate as a by-product. So-called “green” methods for production of caprolactam give relatively high yields, but require expensive high pressure equipment.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the conversion of cyclic amines (typically 5-, 6-, and 7-membered rings) into lactams that can be used for the synthesis of nylons and other commercially important polymers.  This process uses Au/SiO2 to catalyze the reaction of cyclic amines with oxygen at low pressures and uses starting materials that do not require lengthy syntheses.

Advantage:
• Enables synthesis of lactams used for a variety of commercial applications
• Process does not use highly corrosive sulfuric acid or generate ammonium sulfate by product
• Does not require high pressure equipment
• Uses different starting materials than traditional routes to lactams

Application:
Synthesis of nylons and other polymers

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Conversion of cyclic amines to a variety of lactams with yields of up to 50% have been demonstrated experimentally using this process, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194263800Tue, 19 May 2015 12:58:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:2 to catalyze the reaction of cyclic amines with oxygen at low pressures and uses starting materials that do not require lengthy syntheses.

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Process for the Conversion of Cyclic Amines Into LactamsUtilityUnited States8,212,02713/095,5234/27/20117/3/20127/5/20165/14/20157/17/2017FalseTechnology for Compact , Environmentally Friendly Air Conditioners and Heat Pumpshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19488Description:
Currently available heat and mass exchangers, key components in absorption heat pumps, are large and expensive to build. In spite of their favorability as environmentally friendly alternatives to CFC based air conditioners, their size and expense make them viable only for very large scale operations. This invention is a new design for heat and mass exchangers which are compact, modular, versatile, easy to design and fabricate, and can be constructed using existing heat transfer technology and extremely simple heat transfer surfaces. These heat and mass exchangers could be uniformly used for almost all components in an absorption heat pump, including absorbers, desorbers, condensers, evaporators and rectifiers.

Advantage:
• Use of these heat and mass exchangers in the large residential and low-tonnage markets would lead to less ozone depletion and global warming because absorption heat pumps do not rely on CFCs as thermal exchange fluids. The fluids they use are commercially available and inexpensive, as are the basic surfaces for constructing the exchangers. The technology will have lower capital and operational costs than competing technologies. In addition to use in private home and industrial air conditioning, the technology could be used by any industry that relies on thermal systems, such as manufacturing, chemical processing, and power generation industries. Competing products include: CFC based air conditioners for home use, traditional large scale heat and mass exchangers.

Application:
1. Space conditioning equipment manufacturers. 2. Chemical processing and power generation equipment manufacturers.

References:
1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

Stage0.png

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194882500Tue, 19 May 2015 12:28:34 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersContinuationUnited States6,802,36409/669,0569/25/200010/12/200410/12/20165/19/201512/13/2016Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersCIPUnited States7,066,24110/894,3257/19/20046/27/20067/19/20195/19/20157/12/2017FalseImproved Anaerobic Reactor for Municipal and Industrial Waste Processinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19481Description:
This invention is a novel design for an anaerobic bioreactor that can be incorporated into industrial and municipal wastewater treatment.  The new design minimizes the loss of biological solids in the effluent and improves the efficiency of the system by minimizing the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in the process.  The reactor works by retaining the anaerobic catalyst granules in the reaction vessel that is constructed so that no stirring, recirculation, or upflow pumping is necessary. This patent is available for license outside the state of California.

Advantage:
• Provides better treatment in a smaller volume than currently used reactors, such as the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor (UASB) and the Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor (ASBR).
• Meets NPDES discharge requirements (i.e., 30 mg/L BOD5 and 30 mg/L SS) for surface discharge in many instances.
• Efficiency is higher and loss of biosolids into the effluent is lower for this new reactor, which does not require support material or mixing for biomass growth.

Application:
Wastewater treatment equipment manufacturers; producers of anaerobic digester systems/methane capture systems.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Design phase complete:  Laboratory scale prototype is available for demonstrations.

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]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:46 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194812565Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:46 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Static Granular Bed ReactorUtilityUnited States6,709,59110/187,5237/2/20023/23/20047/2/20225/21/20157/28/2016FalseNovel Method for Conversion of Cellulose to High-Value Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19436Summary:
Iowa State University researchers and their colleagues at the Iowa Energy Center have developed an improved method for converting cellulose and related materials to high-value products such as ethylene glycol and propylene glycol.

Description:
Petroleum has long been the starting point for the production of many high-value chemicals such as ethylene glycol, but diminishing petroleum supplies and environmental concerns are driving research into ways to use renewable sources for making these types of compounds.  Biomass is abundant and renewable, but methods to hydrolyze cellulose and related carbohydrate materials for production of small molecules often require the use of harsh or expensive reagents such as strong acids or enzymes since cellulose is usually not soluble in conventional solvents and is also refractory to chemical or biological treatments.  Conventional acid hydrolysis methods have also suffered from the high cost of building corrosion resistant plants, acid recovery, and generation of chemical wastes.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers and their collaborators at the Iowa Energy Center have developed a novel method for the conversion of cellulose and related carbohydrate materials to high-value materials.  This method, which involves heating under pressure a mixture of cellulose and low-molecular-weight alcohol, does not require pretreatment of the starting material and can be used to produce ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and other low molecular weight materials without the use of expensive reagents, metal catalysts, hydrogen gas or enzymes.  In addition, this method produces alkyl glucosides and levoglucosan that can be converted into glucose for subsequent production of ethanol and other products.

Advantage:
• Effective (conversion of biomaterials to alcohol-soluble products is high)
• Simple (avoids the use of metal catalysts, hydrogen gas or enzymes)
• Environmentally friendly (does not produce toxic wastes)
• Robust (relatively insensitive to the presence of impurities)

Application:
Biobased production of high-value chemicals

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Efficient conversion of cellulose to high-value chemicals such as ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, glucosides, and levoglucosan has been demonstrated under laboratory conditions, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194363650Mon, 18 May 2015 10:22:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for the Conversion of Cellulose and Related Carbohydrate Materials to Low-Molecular-Weight CompoundsUtilityUnited States8,383,86412/962,77012/8/20102/26/20137/6/20315/14/20152/27/2017Method for the Conversion of Cellulose and Related Carbohydrate Materials to Low-Molecular-Weight CompoundsCIPUnited States8,686,19213/593,7558/24/20124/1/201412/8/20305/14/20156/21/2017FalseLow-Cost Production Method for Alloys Used in Harsh Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19434Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a series of alloy design and powder or spray processing steps that lead to the low-cost production of oxidation or corrosion resistant metallic alloys.

Description:
Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure to corrosive gases; these alloys must also be able to resist high cycle fatigue, extreme surface wear, and long-term creep deformation.  Iron (Fe)-based superalloys have been developed through a mechanical alloying process that results in a dispersoid strengthened metallic material.  However, mechanical alloying can add significant costs for making alloys that perform well in high temperature environments because it requires expensive milling equipment and extensive milling time; thus commercial applications may be limited.  The long milling time required can also lead to contamination within the alloy powders.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames laboratory researchers have developed a method of making dispersoid strengthened, corrosion/oxidation resistant atomized alloy powder particles for high temperature structural applications.  The method employs gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) linked with alloy design and atomizing parameters to result in the low-cost production of corrosion and/or oxidation resistant metallic alloy particles which are strengthened by disperoids that are highly resistant to coarsening and strength degradation at elevated temperatures.  This new molten metal processing technique can thus result in precision parts with superior properties.

Advantage:
• Economical (simplified process reduces costs and eliminates mechanical alloying process)
• Scalable (commercial productions rates are higher than those for mechanical alloying)
• Effective (enables control of batch-to-batch variation and contamination)

Application:
Powder Metallury Processing

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:27 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194343362Mon, 18 May 2015 10:22:45 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingUtilityUnited States7,699,90511/429,9185/8/20064/20/201012/29/20275/14/20156/21/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingCIPUnited States8,603,21312/072,2982/25/200812/10/201311/14/20285/14/20154/12/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,197,57412/660,3542/25/20106/12/20125/8/20265/14/201511/3/2015Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,864,87013/506,6835/9/201210/21/20146/17/20265/14/20152/27/2017FalseDirect Synthetic Route for Echinacea Compounds (Ynamides)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19448Description:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a direct synthetic route for diacetylenic amides, a type of ynamide, found in the plant Echinacea angustifolia. Echinacea angustifolia is an herb that is used worldwide for ailments such as colds, influenza, infections, laryngitis, and stings, as well as being an immunostimulant for cancer and AIDS. Some of the diacetylenic amides from Echinacea angustifolia have been found to be active against Aede aegypti larvae, a mosquito that carries Yellow fever and Dengue fever, and neonates of Helicoverpa zea, a corn bollworm.

Advantage:
• Currently the diacetylenic amides can only be obtained as a mixture of ynamides by extraction. By synthesizing the individual compounds their specific properties and activities can be determined as well as providing a new and purer way to fulfill the demand for Echinacea angustifolia products.

Application:
Dietary supplement based on Echinacea angustifolia. * New pharmaceuticals based on compounds found in Echinacea angustifolia. * Pesticide for Helicoverpa zea corn bollworms. * Insecticide for Aede aegypti mosquitoes.

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Stage2.png
Development Stage:

]]>Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194483089Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:38 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Dietary supplement based on Echinacea angustifolia. * New pharmaceuticals based on compounds found in Echinacea angustifolia. * Pesticide for Helicoverpa zea corn bollworms. * Insecticide for Aede aegypti mosquitoes.Desc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Synthesis of YnamidesUtilityUnited States7,183,43211/092,3333/29/20052/27/20078/17/20255/15/20155/15/2015FalseProcess of Producing Alpha-Olefins from Fatty Acidshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19425Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an industrially optimized reaction for the transformation of fatty acids into bio-based alpha olefins for the production of specialty chemicals.

Description:
The versatility of alpha-olefins makes these compounds useful for many specialty chemicals, as well as for production of surfactants and lubricants. Reducing the dependence on petroleum-based feedstock for the preparation of alpha-olefins has been the focus of research into utilizing renewable sources for bio-based production of alpha-olefins. As part of this research effort, Iowa State University investigators have developed an efficient and scalable method for preparation of alpha-olefins with decreased isomerization from fatty acid feedstocks using a heterogeneous catalyst. Because this method offers high yields with decreased isomerization, it may be an attractive alternative to conventional industrial approaches that depend on petroleum-based feedstocks, such as oligomerization of ethylene, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis followed by purification, thermal cracking of waxes.

Advantage:
• Environmentally friendly (uses biorenewable raw materials)
• Effective (high yields with decreased isomerization)
• Economical (waste stream can be further processed into useable products)

Application:
Production of alpha olefins for use in detergents, surfactants and specialty chemicals.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Alpha olefins have been produced at a laboratory (grams) scale using this approach, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194253796Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:20 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for Producing OlefinsUtilityUnited States8,629,31213/639,20912/18/20121/14/201412/18/20325/14/20155/5/2017FalseCharacterizing and Fingerprinting Digital Communication Devices for Improved Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19313Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a method for monitoring the communication signature of digital communication devices that can be used for authentication and other security applications.

Description:
The proliferation of digital communications devices and wireless access points has lead to increasing security concerns; these security concerns generally fall under the areas of digital forensics, intrusion detection, and authentication. However, strategies for mitigating these concerns are often inadequate or create a significant administrative overhead burden, such as managing the use of passwords or private keys that are later verified as part of traditional authentication approaches.  To address these concerns, ISU researchers have developed a method of monitoring the communications signature of digital communications devices. These signatures act like voiceprints of the device, allowing it to be uniquely identified.  In addition, the voiceprints can be stored for either online, in-situ identification or for offline analysis. Online, the voiceprints can be used to detect intruders who are either tapping a digital communication device or changing network hardware so as to gain unauthorized access. Offline, the voiceprints are useful for forensic purposes such as proving that a given digital communication device was used in an attack. This technology also has potential for use in wireless network adapters, smart cards, and RFID tags.

Advantage:
• Versatile (enables physical authentication of a variety of digital communication devices)
• Protective (can be used forensically to track hackers and authorized users through the voiceprints they leave behind)

Application:
Authentication of communications devices on computers on networks; forensic analysis of digital communications devices; authentication of Smart Cards, RFID tags, and wireless network adaptors.

References:
Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
The method has been demonstrated experimentally to enable Ethernet devices to be uniquely identified and tracked, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193133130Wed, 13 May 2015 12:40:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Device Identification via Analog Signal Fingerprinting: A Matched Filter Approach”, Ryan M. Gerdes, Thomas E. Daniels, Mani Mina, Steve F. Russell, 2006, Network and Distributed System Security Symposium, San Diego, CA.

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Fingerprinting Digital Devices Using Electromagnetic Characteristics of their CommunicationsUtilityUnited States7,639,80611/087,3653/23/200512/29/200910/29/20285/8/20155/5/2017FalseSelf-Actuating Traction Drive Speed Reducerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19310Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have invented a device which operates as a traction drive speed reducer or a transmission, but is quieter and more efficient than typical geared speed reducers.

Description:
This novel transmission functions as a one-way or over-running clutch that provides a change of speeds or torques. The design allows for the device to sustain sufficient normal forces between rolling elements so that sufficient output torque is generated when needed. This 'as needed' generation of adequate output torque removes the need for a separate clutch in the drive system. The design is simple to manufacture, and will provide a device that is easier to assemble and incorporate into the many mechanical devices where speed reducers and transmissions are used, such as 1. Bicycle manufacturers. 2. Manufacturers of gear speed reducers and transmissions used in the automotive, farm and garden tractor, and sports equipment industries. 3. Power tool and appliance manufacturers. 4. Micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturers. 5. Applicable to variable stiffness suspension systems: can be adapted so that when ratio is changed the "stiffness" of the spring damper system is changed.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the need for a separate clutch for disengaging and engaging the drive train in a mechanical system
• Construction will be easier and less expensive
• Decreases the noise level compared to traditional clutch systems
• Can be applied in a large variety of products.

Application:
traction control and speed reduction in automotive, bicycles, equipment, and MEMS

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Designs are complete and a prototype is available for demonstrations.

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193102630Wed, 13 May 2015 12:19:23 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Self-Actuating, Traction-Drive Speed ChangerUtilityUnited States7,118,51210/363,8963/7/200310/10/200611/4/20235/13/20155/13/2015FalseCooperative Spatial Multiplexing for Wireless Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19308Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna

Description:
Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.

Advantage:
• Requires only one antenna
• Wireless terminal is small and lightweight
• Application in high data rate transmissions

Application:
Wireless data communications

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193083139Wed, 13 May 2015 12:03:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Wireless communication environments are increasingly resource-constrained, with a limited and highly regulated spectrum. In addition, the practicality of the wireless terminal is constrained by a finite energy supply and space limitations. To address these problems, ISU researchers have developed a cooperative spatial multiplexing strategy that requires only a single antenna by creating a virtual antenna array from a collection of antennas belonging to other terminals. Each relay node in the virtual antenna array detects only a fraction of the source data stream; all the sub-streams are then simultaneously forwarded over the same physical channel. Multiple receive antennas or Rake fingers at the destination then allow the sub-streams to be separately detected based on their spatial characteristics or spreading codes.Unlike other spatial multiplexing techniques that require multiple antennas at both the transmitter and receiver, creating a bulky and heavy wireless terminal, cooperative spatial multiplexing requires only one antenna, making the wireless terminal small and light. Cooperative spatial multiplexing also reduces the transmit and receive requirements on each relay node by shifting the transmission burden to the destination terminal. This makes cooperative spatial multiplexing especially useful for high data rate transmissions.Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Cooperative Spatial MultiplexingUtilityUnited States8,345,69311/405,8584/18/20061/1/201311/26/20305/8/20152/27/2017FalseObserver Based Q Control for Scanning Probe Microscopyhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19304Summary:
Method for decreasing the cantilever damping coefficient resulting in increased resolution in atomic force miscroscopy

Description:
Examination of the surface properties of inorganic and biological materials at the molecular level can be performed using atomic force microscopy. In atomic force microscopy, the desired bandwidth or resolution can be achieved by active quality factor, or Q, control. Currently used Q control methods result in a trade-off between resolution and bandwidth. To simultaneously improve both bandwidth and resolution, ISU researchers have developed an observer-based Q control method that enables the cantilever to behave like a mass-spring-damper system. This method overcomes difficulties encountered in currently used active Q-control systems that are incurred when the damping coefficient of the cantilever increases, resulting in decreased resolution when damping occurs in air, or reduced scan speed when the cantilever is controlled under fluids.

Advantage:
• Detects high bandwidth content of sample features
• High probability for detecting small sample features
• Increases flexibility: improves resolution when the cantilever is operated in air 
• increases scan speed when the cantilever is operated under fluids

Application:
Atomic force microscopy; scanning probe microscopy

References:
“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Observer-based Q control has been shown experimentally to increase bandwidth content features of samples while preserving resolution

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193043299Wed, 13 May 2015 11:57:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Transient-signal-based sample-detection in atomic force microscopy”, Deepak R. Sahoo, Abu Sebastian, and Murti V. Salapaka, 2003, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83:5521-5523

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Observer Based Q-Control Imaging Methods for Atomic Force MicroscopyUtilityUnited States7,627,43811/796,2054/27/200712/1/20097/19/20275/8/20158/15/2017FalseSpherically Focused Air-Coupled Foil Transducerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19315Summary:
A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer

Description:
The use of air-coupled ultrasonic transducers for materials inspection, characterization and ultrasonic imaging is becoming more widespread because it permits non-contact evaluation of materials such as wood, paper, composites, plastics, or any light-weight material, or inspection of large structures. Prior efforts to optimize transducer sensitivity and image resolution have largely involved the use of mirrors and backplates or wafers that result in incomplete focusing, low sensitivity or bandwidth limitations. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducer that consists of a thin metallized polymer membrane, a flexible backplate, and a spherically curved backing fixture. The resulting device demonstrates higher signal amplitude, better bandwidth and better spatial resolution than other air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and should lead to improved ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation and imaging. Unlike currently used ultra-sound devices that cannot be focused without mirrors or interference plates, the air-coupled foil transducer enables spherical focusing that concentrates the sound energy, resulting in improved image resolution and enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements

Advantage:
• Inexpensive
• Improved image resolution
• Enhanced sensitivity of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements
• Does not require intermediate optics

Application:
Air-coupled ultrasonic measurement; ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:37 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193153209Wed, 13 May 2015 11:52:13 GMTSummary:A simple, low-cost fabrication method to produce a spherically focused air-coupled foil transducerDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Air-Coupled TransducerUtilityUnited States7,759,84211/913,9214/28/20087/20/20105/26/20265/8/20158/4/2017FalseEnergy-Extraction-Based Active Noise Control Systemhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19299Summary:
Reduction of noise in vehicles, machinery, buildings or other structures is highly desirable, but difficult to achieve because of the complex physical interactions involved.  ISU researchers have developed an active noise control system with potential applications in a variety of industries, such as aircraft, home appliances, automobiles and machinery

Description:
Suppressing noise in home and work environments, such as in buildings, vehicles, engines, appliances, or machinery, is important for comfort and health reasons.  One approach to active noise control is to use adaptive disturbance cancellation techniques. However, effective noise control is hard to accomplish because analytical models for acoustic-structure interactions are difficult to obtain and significant modeling uncertainties persist.  To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

Advantage:
• Reduces noise generated from both structural and acoustic sources
• Achieves uniform broadband reduction in noise and vibration

Application:
Reduction of noise and vibration in acoustic structures for industries such as aircraft, home appliances, engines, and industrial machinery.

References:
“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192993045Wed, 13 May 2015 11:51:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these difficulties, ISU researchers in collaboration with NASA scientists have developed an energy-extraction-based active noise control system.  This system is based on passivity theory and uses acoustic sensors and actuators as well as structural sensors and actuators to reduce both acoustic and structural energy.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Modeling and Control of Acoustic-Structure Interaction in 3-D Enclosures”, B. Fang, A.G. Kelkar, and S. M. Joshi, 2002, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Las Vegas, NV.
]]>
Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise controlUtilityUnited States7,623,99310/731,74212/9/200311/24/200911/27/20265/8/20155/5/2017False1+N Protection for Mesh Networks Using Network Coding on Protection Cycleshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19305Summary:
Optical fiber failures can result in disruptions in communication networks. ISU researchers have developed a technique to provide transparent non-stop service in communication networks while efficiently utilizing resources.

Description:
The advent of optical fibers in communication network backbones has allowed large amounts of bandwidth to be carried on a single fiber. Failure of single fiber, which is not an uncommon occurrence, can therefore affect large numbers of users and connections. Preserving the ability of a network to operate, or network survivability, is thus critical if any part of the network should fail. Current methods for providing optical network survivability include predesigned protection (i.e., 1+1, where a single session is protected by duplicating the resources required by the session) and dynamic restoration (i.e., 1:N, where resources for a single session are shared among N sessions). While 1+1 protection techniques are nearly instantaneous, they require duplication of resources. 1:N techniques are more efficient, since resources for a single session are shared between N sessions. However, these methods are also slower and require management and control planes involvement, since detection of the failure, and determining which session should use the backup facilities are necessary. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a 1+N protection technique for mesh networks that uses network coding on protection cycles. This method is similar to the 1+1, except that one backup circuit is shared between N sessions, and data from all N sessions is transmitted on the backup circuit. The use of the network coding technique results in significants saving over the 1+1 method, while using roughly the same resources required by the 1:N method, but at the speed of the 1+1 method.

Advantage:
• Transparent protection against single link failures.
• Fast protection since no failure detection or switching is involved.
• Reduced bandwidth and resource requirements, since multiple communication sessions use the same resources required to protect a single session.
• Simpler control and management planes.
• Can be implemented at a number of layers.
• Error detection and correction.

Application:
Communications networks

References:
Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Method demonstrated in the laboratory

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193053400Tue, 12 May 2015 07:07:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Kamal, A. E. “1+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using p-Cycles.” IEEE/ACM Trans. Networking 18, no. 1, (February 2010): 67–80.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-47401+N Network Protection for Mesh Networks: Network Coding-Based Protection Using P-Cycles and Protection PathsUtilityUnited States7,869,34412/323,59811/26/20081/11/20113/11/20295/8/20155/8/2015FalseBoride-Rich Boron Material for Neutron Detectionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19255Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that can be used to detect nuclear substances

Description:
Neutrons are produced by fission of nuclear materials or by naturally occurring radioactive decay.  Detection of neutrons, for example at transportation hubs, in shipping containers, or in luggage, may indicate the presence of smuggled nuclear material or even hidden nuclear weapons.  However, neutrons are difficult to detect because they lack a charge and conventional neutron detectors require large gas-filled chambers and high voltages.  Efforts to miniaturize neutron detectors through the development of new materials have suffered from drawbacks that include low sensitivity, susceptibility to radiation damage, and lattice strain.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a boride-rich boron material that has utility for neutron detection.  This icosahedral boride semiconducting material has a higher volumetric density of boron atoms than other boride-based neutron detecting materials, can be made an n-type semiconducting material—enabling all boride n-p junctions—and is homogeneous.  In addition, the material can be applied as an amorphous material, with potentially better resistance to radiation damage, as well as a crystalline film.  Since the material can be manufactured using sputtering or pulsed laser deposition, it may thus enable the development of practical and inexpensive neutron detectors with potentially great value in homeland security, industrial safety, and other applications. 

Advantage:
• Effective (the material shows relatively high carrier mobility, even in an amorphous form)

• Flexible (can be applied as amorphous material or crystalline film)

• Safer and more environmentally friendly (can be produced using pulsed laser deposition which does not require the use of toxic gases needed for chemical vapor deposition or other production methods)
• Robust (the material shows less lattice strain for growth on silicon than other boron-based materials)

Application:
Neutron Sensing for Homeland Security and Other Applications

References:
“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192553277Tue, 12 May 2015 07:07:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:
]]>

]]>
Application:

]]>References:“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740AlMgB14 and Related Icosahedral Boride Semiconducting Materials for Neutron Sensing ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,375,34311/422,6296/7/20065/20/200811/9/20255/7/20158/25/2015FalseImproved Robot and Stepper Motor Controlshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19306Summary:
ISU researchers have developed robot and stepper motor control software that contributes to the improved operation of robots

Description:
The Bouton-McConnell Stepper Motor Controller for Vibration-Free Fast Response, involves control techniques that permit stepper motors to behave like closed loop DC motors when implemented using  Robust Vibration Suppression (RVS) control techniques. This control technique enhances noise suppression and can achieve high speeds without sacrificing the control of residual vibrations. It can be applied to currently operating stepper motor systems.

Advantage:
• Robust (minimally affected by system operating dynamics)
• Fast (robot response time is minimized)
• Quiet (permits broad band noise suppression)
• Versatile (can be applied to a variety of control systems)

Application:
Robotic controls; stepper motor control

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
This technology has been applied to a flexible robot arm that moves a large distance in the range of 90 to 180 degrees using a minimal amount of time

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:41:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193061832Mon, 11 May 2015 12:10:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsUtilityUnited States6,002,23208/912,2838/15/199712/14/19998/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017Robust Vibration Suppression Methods and SystemsContinuationUnited States6,011,37309/303,4624/30/19991/4/20008/15/20175/8/20158/25/2017FalseContext Sensitive Real-Time Data-Driven Music Algorithmshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19311Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a set of algorithms for creating music based on real time data.  This approach allows aural information to be combined with visual cueing to enhance data analysis.

Description:
We live in a world filled with sound and receive a wide range of information aurally. By adding this information to our visual cueing, we more fully understand our environment. Sound directs our viewing and adds essential contextual information.  Because of this, numerous efforts to sonify data—represent data with sound—have been performed.  However, these efforts have mapped data directly to various aspects of sound, causing a result that is difficult to understand or irritating to listen to.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a musical approach to the sonification of data.  Because music can convey a large amount of information, it can enable users to perceive more facets of the data.  This method includes the use of context sensitive grammars, fractal algorithms, and atonal compositional techniques with the result that the music builds in listenability and flexibility for broad applicability to different types of data without external intervention by the composer.  This approach also provides a connection between micro- and macro-scales of the data, thus allowing the user to fully experience its intricacies and interrelationships.  Potential applications of this technique include ambient awareness, exploration of large complex data sets for scientific research and engineering design, augmentation of remote control of tractors or other working machinery, enhancement of viewing of websites or museum displays, use as a composition tool for creating music for performance, and providing an additional information channel during crowd surveillance or other visual targeting/surveillance activities.

Advantage:
• Versatile (can be used with diverse types of data sets)
• Flexible (use of atonal compositional techniques requires less rigid syntax than tonal music and enables real-time sonification)
• Listenable (musical approach creates pleasing aural results)

Application:
Sonfication of data for enhanced analysis and understanding.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A simulation is available for demonstration, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193113074Fri, 08 May 2015 15:44:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Creating Realtime Data-Driven Music Using Context Sensitive Grammars and Fractal AlgorithmsUtilityUnited States7,304,22810/985,30111/10/200412/4/200711/10/20245/8/20155/8/2015FalseA Geared, Continuously Variable Speed Transmissionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19302Summary:
Most vehicles today use transmissions that provide three or four specific speed ratios, but do not necessarily allow the car engine to operate at optimum speed. To increase the efficiency of vehicle operation, ISU researchers have developed a continuously variable speed transmission that can improve performance.

Description:
Most cars on the road today use transmissions that supply three or four specific speed ratios, but do not automatically optimize vehicle operation. Some vehicles today use variable speed belt drives or toroidal, continuously variable speed transmissions. However, these transmissions typically use traction drive elements that transmit forces and motion through friction, and larger loads require larger drive packages. To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed a geared continuously variable speed transmission that produces continuously variable speeds by using gears instead of friction elements. As a result, higher loads can be managed than with traction drives of the same size. In addition, this continuously variable speed transmission can help vehicles run more efficiently and save fuel costs.

Advantage:
• Enables smooth vehicle operation (eliminates shift shock)
• Permits operation at optimum throttle position (or optimum engine speed) which allows for peak torque and improved acceleration
• Improves automobile efficiency, resulting in fuel savings

Application:
Automotive transmissions, bicycle transmissions, machine tool transmissions

Stage3.png
Development Stage:


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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:33 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193023131Fri, 08 May 2015 15:38:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Geared, Continuously Variable Speed TransmissionUtilityUnited States7,938,03311/828,6217/26/20075/10/20113/8/20305/8/201510/7/2016Geared, Continuously Variable Speed TransmissionCIPUnited States8,534,14612/851,6708/6/20109/17/201311/21/20285/8/20152/27/2017FalseUtilizing Timing Error Detection and Recovery to Dynamically Improve Superscalar Processor Performance: SPRIT3Ehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19301Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a method that enables modern high performance computer processors to operate reliably at speeds higher than previously possible.

Description:
Modern processors (and in fact all synchronous logic circuits) use a clock to control execution of the circuit. The speed of this clock, which in large part determines how quickly the processor runs applications, is traditionally limited by worst case delay. The resulting propagation delay is difficult to determine precisely for three main reasons. First, variations induced when computer chips are produced create variable delays in the chips. Second, variations in environmental conditions during operation, such as temperature and voltage, affect the delay through the circuit. Finally, although it is possible to find the longest paths through the logic, it is not known how often the input combinations given during operation will use these paths. To avoid timing errors, traditional design assumes worst case values for these factors, giving an overly high delay estimate, and causing the clock period to be set too slow. To overcome this limitation and increase clock speed, ISU researchers have developed SPRIT3E (Superscalar PeRformance Improvement Through Tolerating Timing Errors). By applying fault tolerance combined with dynamic control theory, this technique performs error detection and correction, and allows clock speeds to scale farther, which in turn lets applications finish earlier. In addition, this method may be applied to any modern processor, since the limitation it overcomes is applicable to all synchronous logic circuits.

Advantage:
• Enables processors to reliably execute applications faster than previously possible
• Performs both error detection and correction (unlike the closest competitor, which performs only error avoidance)
• May be applied to any modern processor, since it overcomes the limitation of the worst case delay assumption that places a minimum on the clock period of modern digital circuits

Application:
High performance processor design; synchronous logic circuit design

 

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:35:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193013421Fri, 08 May 2015 15:35:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Superscale Processor Performance Enhancement Through Reliable Dynamic Clock Frequency TuningUtilityUnited States7,671,62712/107,4154/22/20083/2/20104/22/20285/8/20156/21/2017FalseA Method for Machining Metallic Foamhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19297Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process for cutting metallic foam that eliminates smearing while still allowing custom shapes to be created.

Description:
The present invention relates to a process of cutting metallic foams that eliminates the problem of smeared surfaces. When a traditional machining approach is used, the surface of the material smears, causing the surface pores of the foam to close.  This invention is the first method capable of machining foams using conventional machining processes, rather than non traditional methods such as electrical discharge machining (EDM). EDM is capable of cutting the material without smearing, but is not an easily customizable process. Moreover, recent research has shown that EDM has a detrimental effect on the material properties, in particular, a reduction in porosity. Initial testing of this newly invented process indicates that the porosity of the TM may not be affected using the new approach. This process could enable the creation of custom shaped TM implants of virtually any free-form geometry, using a CT scan derived CAD model of the desired geometry.

Advantage:
• Eliminates smeared surfaces
• Easily customizable
• Does not appear to affect metal porosity
• Can be used with conventional machining techniques

Application:
Machining metallic foams like trabecular metal for applications such as bone implants.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The utility of the method has been demonstrated using trabecular metal and a CAD model of a human femur fracture segment, and Iowa State University is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:43 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192973497Fri, 08 May 2015 15:20:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseREBEL: REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic for Cyber Securityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19260Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new method for ensuring the security of computer-generated transactions.

Description:
The pervasion of computer-based transactions in every day life has led to an increased need for cryptography to ensure that cyber transactions are secure.  Classical methods for encryption/decryption, such as asymmetric RSA encryption/decryption or symmetric block ciphers (for example, NIST standard AES), can take tens of millions of computing cycles that slow the speed of data encryption/decryption.  In addition, these systems also suffer from security vulnerabilities through the use of S-boxes, where public knowledge of S-box constants allows for an adversary to develop static statistical models to exploit them.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

Advantage:
• Rapid (provides encryption and decryption at data rates 10-20 times higher than currently used methods) 
• Secure (S-boxes are not used so the system is not vulnerable to attack mediated by static statistical models)
• Versatile (can be included in hardware in embedded processors used in devices such as cell phones, smart cards (ATM cards), wireless routers, etc.)

Application:
Cyber security; Cryptography

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Data encryption at rates in the vicinity of 128 Gigabits/second has been demonstrated, and security guarantees make the probability of a successful breach near random—many times more secure than the current AES standard.  A computer simulation is available for demonstration.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192603404Fri, 08 May 2015 14:56:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description: ISU researchers have developed REBEL, or REconfigurable Block Encryption Logic, an alternate method for symmetric encryption/decryption which uses the secret as truth tables of a reconfigurable gate as opposed to S-boxes; these gates are deployed in a tree circuit whose security properties are extremely strong.  In addition, this technology can be implemented in underlying hardware, enabling very fast data encryption and decryption.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Reconfigurable Block Encryption LogicUtilityUnited States8,824,67212/101,4114/11/20089/2/20148/2/20315/7/20159/13/2017FalseTubular Shell Wind Turbine Tower Constructed of UHPC for Taller Turbineshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19105

Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have enable construction of taller towers for wind turbines for better wind capture and increased power generation.

Description:
Wind energy is an area of increasing interest for power generation.  Wind turbines, which generate electrical power, are mounted on towers; the specific energy yield increases with the height of the tower due to higher winds above ground level.  However, as tower heights increase, so do transportation, construction and assembly costs; towers made of steel that are over 100 m in height—capable of producing multi-megawatts of electricity—require a diameter at the tower base of over 5 meters to support the towerhead weights of hundreds of tons, which prohibits their transportation by road.  High wind turbine towers made of steel may also be vulnerable to buckling or other damage due loads from winds, snow, seismic activity, etc.  To address the demands to balance wind turbine construction and transportation costs with efficiency and accessibility, ISU researchers have designed and tested construction of wind turbine towers using ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC).  These towers may enable erection of wind turbines at heights of 100 meters, about 20 meters higher than today’s wind turbines.  As a consequence, the steadier and less turbulent winds at that height could be harnessed to provide increased power production.  These UHPC towers are assembled from hexagonal shaped segments that can be easily shipped over road and built on site.

Advantage:
• Increased tower life through use of ultra-high performance and high-strength concrete
• Enables increased tower height
• Components are small enough to permit transportation by standard trucking
• Can be assembled on site
• Towers can be customized for any turbine size

Application:
Wind energy

Development Stage:
Tower segments have been tested and found to withstand 36% beyond extreme load for a 100 meter high tower, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Stage0.png

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]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191053732Fri, 08 May 2015 08:12:23 GMTSummary: ]]>Iowa State University researchers have enable construction of taller towers for wind turbines for better wind capture and increased power generation.

]]>Description: ]]>Wind energy is an area of increasing interest for power generation.  Wind turbines, which generate electrical power, are mounted on towers; the specific energy yield increases with the height of the tower due to higher winds above ground level.  However, as tower heights increase, so do transportation, construction and assembly costs; towers made of steel that are over 100 m in height—capable of producing multi-megawatts of electricity—require a diameter at the tower base of over 5 meters to support the towerhead weights of hundreds of tons, which prohibits their transportation by road.  High wind turbine towers made of steel may also be vulnerable to buckling or other damage due loads from winds, snow, seismic activity, etc.  To address the demands to balance wind turbine construction and transportation costs with efficiency and accessibility, ISU researchers have designed and tested construction of wind turbine towers using ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC).  These towers may enable erection of wind turbines at heights of 100 meters, about 20 meters higher than today’s wind turbines.  As a consequence, the steadier and less turbulent winds at that height could be harnessed to provide increased power production.  These UHPC towers are assembled from hexagonal shaped segments that can be easily shipped over road and built on site.

]]>Advantage: ]]>Increased tower life through use of ultra-high performance and high-strength concrete ]]>Enables increased tower height ]]>Components are small enough to permit transportation by standard trucking ]]>Can be assembled on site ]]>Towers can be customized for any turbine size]]>Application: ]]>Wind energy

]]>Development Stage:]]>Tower segments have been tested and found to withstand 36% beyond extreme load for a 100 meter high tower, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Wind Turbine Tower SystemUtilityUnited States9,016,01213/478,4975/23/20124/28/201510/6/20325/8/20158/25/2017Wind Turbine Tower SystemCIPUnited States8,881,48514/276,6335/13/201411/11/20145/23/20325/3/20158/25/2017FalseImproved Eddy Current Coil Design for Nondestructive Evaluationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19209Summary:
Researchers have developed an improved design and method for making eddy current coils that are used in eddy current sensing probes for nondestructive testing.

Description:
Eddy current sensing has been a staple in techniques used for nondestructive evaluation of critical components such as air frames or engine parts. Coils used for eddy current sensing probes have traditionally been formed by hand by winding a wire a number of times around a core.  However, this approach to forming coils leads to variations in number of turns in a coil, spacing between the turns, and alignment of turns on the core, resulting in high variability in the coils and the eddy current sensing probes.  The significant variability of eddy current probe sensitivity has been recognized as an important issue for decades, and yet no satisfactory resolution has been found to date.  To address this issue, Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved eddy current coil design and fabrication procedure in which the coil is formed through depositing film traces. This process is amenable to machine manufacturing and provides more precision and uniformity in the coils, thus reducing their performance variability.  In addition, this method may enable the manufacture of probes that are smaller and more sensitive, and may be used for probes that have a single coil or a sensor array.

Advantage:
• Consistent (probes fabricated from these coils will give highly reproducible results)
• Simple (fabrication method is amenable to automation and avoids tedious forming by hand)
• Versatile (probe elements of various sizes can be produced)

Application:
Nondestructive evaluation

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192093062Thu, 07 May 2015 14:36:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Apparatus for Forming Coil for Use in Eddy Current Sensing ProbeUtilityUnited States7,795,86311/064,3252/23/20059/14/20104/12/20285/7/20159/15/2017FalseEnhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19211Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a soft lithography microlens fabrication and array that enables more efficient organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), improving their commercial viability.

Description:
OLEDs have received considerable attention for applications such as lighting and displays because they consume less energy than other technologies such as liquid crystal displays; in addition, they produce higher quality images since the pixels in an OLED generate their own light which can be turned off to make a pixel truly black and create a high contrast ratio.  However, OLEDs have not gained much commercial traction for lighting applications because they are expensive to manufacture and because there are intrinsic lighting inefficiencies due the OLED structure causing emitted light to be internally reflected or lost through edge emission.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microlens array design and fabrication method that creates a new (micro)luminaire that is structurally integrated with the OLED pixel. The microlens array is produced using low cost soft lithography techniques on the substrate of OLEDs and enhances light extraction.  In addition, it is suitable for all colors, including white, and can be used for any configuration, pixel size, or pixel shape.  Since this microlens array makes OLEDs more efficient and since it can be manufactured using an economically viable method, it also makes commercial applications for OLEDs more practical.

Advantage:
• Economical (production does not require a clean room and uses low cost microtransfer molding technique)
• Efficient (100% enhancement of light extraction has been demonstrated experimentally)
• Versatile (can be used for all colors and any pixel size or shape as well as any configuration)

Application:
Lighting and displays

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A 100% enhancement of the electroluminescence (EL) output compared to OLEDs with conventional structure has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192113831Thu, 07 May 2015 14:33:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Soft Lithography Microlens Fabrication and Array for Enhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)UtilityUnited States8,742,40613/397,7492/16/20126/3/20145/19/20325/5/20159/15/2017FalseEfficient Polymer Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19212Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for producing more efficient polymer solar cells by increasing light absorption through a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer deposited on a textured substrate.

Description:
So-called first generation photovoltaic or solar cells are based on the use of crystalline silicon wafers.  While improvements in efficiency have been made with these types of solar cells, their high cost has driven research into materials that would be cheaper to use.  Second generation photovoltaic technologies with the potential to be more economical to manufacture include thin-film, organic (polymer or oligomer), and hybrid organic-inorganic cells.  Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have a number of advantages, including manufacturability (roll-to-roll processes on flexible substrates are possible), low-temperature processing, high optical absorption coefficients, and tunability. Unfortunately, OPVs suffer from low power conversion efficiencies, with 7% being among the highest documented experimentally.  To address this problem, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed for a process to produce a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer on textured substrates that improves the efficiency of polymer solar cells by increasing light trapping.  While the use of textured substrates is commonly used in conventional, silicon-based solar cells, attempts to use textured substrates in polymer solar cells have not been successful because they require expensive extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies that can result in a light-absorbing layer with air gaps or sub-optimal coating thickness in the valleys or on the ridges of the substrate pattern; these solar cells can have poor performance due to a loss of charges and short circuiting at the valleys and ridges.  The technology developed by the ISU team overcomes these drawbacks by optimizing the dimensions of the underlying topographical features, enabling a conformal photovoltaic active layer to be coated on the textured substrate.  As consequence, light trapping is enhanced, resulting in more efficient power conversion compared to flat solar cells. Light captured at the red/near infrared band edge is also increased compared to flat solar cells.

Advantage:
• Efficient (light trapping is more effective compared to flat solar cells without compromising electrical characteristics)
• Economical (does not require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies)

Application:
Solar cell manufacturing

References:
1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
An increase in power conversion efficiency of 20 percent compared to flat solar cells made from polymers, as well as an increase in light captured at the red/near infrared band edge of 100 percent over flat cells has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192123847Thu, 07 May 2015 13:13:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSpurious-Noise-Free Switching Power Converterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19207Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a new control scheme for switching power converters that makes them suitable for powering noise-sensitive loads, such as analog and RF (radio frequency) applications.

Description:
Switching power converters are extensively used in electronic devices because of their high power conversion efficiency. However, the spurious output noise they create due to periodic switching precludes their use for noise-sensitive loads—particularly analog and RF load types. Traditionally, linear regulators have been used to mitigate this problem, but can result in much lower power efficiencies. Spread-Spectrum control techniques, such as Σ-Δ and Δ modulation, can be used to reduce the spurious noise in switching power converters, but result in large wide-band increase in the noise floor, while random frequency hopping techniques reduce the spur level at the expense of generating multiple additional spurs. To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a new PWM control scheme for switching regulators that combines phase chopping with random frequency hopping to achieve completely spur-free operation, while delivering low output noise floor with no sub-harmonics due to hopping. The proposed architecture is very attractive for designing generic low-noise power supplies for spur-sensitive loads, as well as loads sensitive to the random noise floor without post linear regulation, extra passive filtering, or customization for each load. This results in much better power efficiency and reduced implementation size and cost. Moreover, since spur-elimination is based on the fundamental switching behavior of the regulator, spur-free operation is accomplished not only at the output, but at every node in the regulator including the input power and ground rails and the substrate. This significantly reduces Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and facilitates integration of switching regulators in mixed-signal Systems-on-Chip (SoCs) without interfering with other sensitive circuits that share the same substrate or power rails. The performance achieved by this novel control scheme makes switching power converters suitable for directly powering many noise-sensitive analog and RF applications, such as RF mixers, RF Low Noise Amplifiers, and RF Power Amplifiers. Additionally, the proposed architecture can be used for implementing class-D amplifiers with reduced EMI filters, and supply modulators for RF Polar Power Amplifiers. The proposed scheme constitutes minimal area, power, and design effort beyond traditional single-switching-frequency PWM-controlled design, and can be easily incorporated with an already existing regulator.

Advantage:
• Versatile (has utility for many noise-sensitive applications)
• Economical (reduces size, cost and power consumption)
• Efficient (obviates the need for post filtering stages and may extend battery life in portable applications)
• Integrate-able (can be easily integrated on the same chip with other noise-sensitive circuits without affecting their performance)

Application:
Switching power converters; power amplifier supply modulator

References:
1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The converter has been demonstrated to eliminate spurs and have a very low noise floor when implemented in 0.35 µM standard CMOS technology, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192073870Thu, 07 May 2015 13:00:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1. Spurious-noise-Free Buck Regulator for direct powering of analog/RF loads using pwM control with Random Frequency Hopping and Random Phase Chopping”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2011. IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC 2011), San Francisco, CA.

2. A Low-Noise PFM-Controlled Buck Converter for Low-Power applications”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I.

3. A GSM Power Amplifier Directly-Powered from a DC-DC Power Converter”, Chengwu Tao and Ayman Fayed. 2012. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters.

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System and Method for Providing Power via a Spurious-Noise-Free Switching DeviceUtilityUnited States8,901,90513/397,2512/15/201212/2/201410/19/20325/5/20152/27/2017FalseIntegrated Phased Array Antennahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19206Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a phased array antenna system with improved spatial control for wireless communications.

Description:
Phased array antenna systems have many applications in wireless communications—particularly MIMO Communications (multiple input and multiple output).  By using multiple antennas to transmit and receive the signal, the transmit rate can be optimized to the capacity limit of the channel while simultaneously improving security.  Phased arrays steer the main beam of an antenna in a given angular direction in the line-of-sight (LOS) path reducing multipath effects. However, accurate adjustability of the phase and amplitude characteristics for each element of a phased array can be problematic, resulting in less than optimal control of beam patterns that can cause interference in areas of with intense use of wireless communications. To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed an integrated phased array antenna system that allows for spatial control of the received and transmitting antenna by controlling the phases and amplitude of each radiating element using baseband phase shifting, which is up converted to RF (radio frequency) using a phase lock loop (PLL) synthesizer.  As a consequence, the costs associated with performing phase shifting in the RF region, which was done previously, are mitigated and antenna performance is improved. The integrated phased array antenna has utility for applications such as wireless communications and networking, commercial and military radar, and space-time adaptive communications.

Advantage:
• Economical (lowers operating costs)
• Effective (enables accurate control of beam pattern of the array)

Application:
Communications and wireless networking

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192063587Thu, 07 May 2015 12:57:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Phased Array System Using Baseband Phase ShiftingUtilityUnited States8,013,79112/182,6787/30/20089/6/20111/30/20295/7/201511/15/2016FalseDevice for Hydrogen Separationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19194Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed improved hydrogen separation membranes for sequestration of carbon dioxide in coal fired power plants.

Description:
The high cost of palladium has been a barrier to metal membrane technology replacing large scale hydrogen purification methods.  In addition, commercially available metal membrane require that relatively thick layers of palladium or other high-cost hydrogen membrane alloys to be applied to achieve successful hydrogen separation.  To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a novel metal membrane support material with smaller, more uniform pores and a smoother surface.  These properties enable essentially continuous hydrogen separating membrane films on the order of a few (or less) microns thick. The thinner films may also lead to large cost reductions and have therefore the potential for more economical production. Also, significant gains are possible in membrane throughput, because of the ability to operate at higher temperatures based on the diffusion barrier profile of the new membrane support.

Advantage:
• Economical (thinner films require less material)
• Efficient (enables increased membrane throughput and prevents contamination that slows hydrogen diffusion)
• Robust (can perform separations at higher temperature ranges)

Application:
Hydrogen separation membranes for carbon sequestration in coal-fired power plants

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Metal membranes have been fabricated and demonstrated to efficiently separate hydrogen under high temperature conditions.

Desc0000.png

 

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191943809Thu, 07 May 2015 08:08:45 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Hydrogen separation membranes for carbon sequestration in coal-fired power plantsStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Metal membranes have been fabricated and demonstrated to efficiently separate hydrogen under high temperature conditions.Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Device for Hydrogen Separation and MethodUtilityUnited States7,611,56511/581,98110/16/200611/3/200911/16/20265/7/20152/27/2017FalseControlled Metal Photodepositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19193Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a reliable method for synthesis of semiconductor-metal heterostructures to enable application of materials in catalytic, magnetic, and opto-electronic devices.

Description:
Interest in the synthesis of colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid nanostructures has grown exponentially in recent years. Laser spot irradiation has been reported to have some control over metal deposition; however, this process has low yields and requires expensive equipment.  It also has the potential to change the structure of the metal deposit as a result of the high energy intensity of the laser. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have discovered a method that enables illumination of much larger areas at a time and that provides unprecedented control over deposition locale. This could lead to a larger synthetic throughput and wider general availability of finely-structured semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures. Initial studies of the process to obtain II.VI semiconductor (cadmium selenium/sulfide) nanorods with active metal (either platinum or palladium) nanoparticles have shown that the heterostructrues become redox-active upon illumination and are capable of mediating photo-induced chemical transformations. The technology results in better, cheaper and more widely available photocatalytic materials for renewable energy and environmental remediation applications.

Advantage:
• Controlled fabrication of colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures
• High yields of site-selective nanoparticles
• Simple, scalable method for metal photodeposition

Application:
Metal photodeposition for catalytic and magnetic materials, as well as opto-electronic devices.

References:
1. "Expanding the One-Dimensional CdS-CdSe Composition Landscape: Acially Anisotropic CdS1-xSexNanorods," T. Purnima, A. Ruberu, and J. Vela, 2011, ACS Nano 5(7): 5775 - 5784

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis of the semi-conductor-metal heterostructures has been accomplished on a laboratory scale, samples are available for testing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png


 

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191933956Thu, 07 May 2015 08:08:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Expanding the One-Dimensional CdS-CdSe Composition Landscape: Acially Anisotropic CdS1-xSexNanorods," T. Purnima, A. Ruberu, and J. Vela, 2011, ACS Nano 5(7): 5775 - 5784

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseControl Algorithm for Rapid, Broadband Measurement of Nanomechanical Properties in Hardness Testinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19124Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a control algorithm that may reduce the time required to obtain measurements for hardness testing.

Description:
Indentation hardness testing is performed to determine the hardness of a material to deformation.  With the advent of nanotechnology and the need to examine material properties at smaller and smaller scales, new techniques are being developed to measure mechanical properties on very small scales.  For example, hardness testing using microindentation tests employ forces of about 2 N and indentations of about 50 µm, while nanoindentation tests, which use small loads and tip sizes, result in indentations that are very small (only a few square micrometers or nanometers).  Despite the growing interest in image analysis and automated indentation reading in hardness testing, however, current approaches for measurement are limited in the frequency range that can be measured and the time duration required for measurement for materials whose properties change with time (for example, during rapid-stage crystallization of polymers).  To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed a control-integrated optimal design input approach that utilizes inversion-based iterative learning control to apply a precise excitation force on the sample under analysis. This approach allows determination of the optimal excitation force profile that should be applied in indentation-based nanomechanical measurements in order to maximize the measurement frequency range. As a consequence, this technology may enable rapid, broadband measurement of nanomechanical properties during the dynamic evolution of soft samples, such as during the cell fusion process or during rapid polymer crystallization.

Advantage:
• Rapid (reduces measurement time)
• Efficient (minimizes the number of frequency components needed)
• Broadband (maximizes frequency measurement range)

Application:
Materials analysis

References:
“Optimal input design for indentation-based rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy: poly(dimethylsiloxane) example”,  Xu, A. and Q. Zou. 2011. American Control Conference, June 29-July 1, San Franscico, CA.

Development Stage:
Stage3.png
The utility of the control-integrated optimal input design approach has been demonstrated experimentally using the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191243914Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:“Optimal input design for indentation-based rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy: poly(dimethylsiloxane) example”,  Xu, A. and Q. Zou. 2011. American Control Conference, June 29-July 1, San Franscico, CA.

]]>Development Stage:Stage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Optimal Excitation Force Design Indentation-Based Rapid Broadband Nanomechanical SpectroscopyUtilityUnited States8,590,06113/425,4563/21/201211/19/20133/21/20325/4/20157/19/2017FalseMethod and System for Manufacturing an Article Using Portable Hand-Held Toolshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19123Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for avoiding manufacturing mistakes by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools that are used during assembly.

Description:
During various manufacturing steps, such as assembly, welding, and painting, it is often necessary for a worker to use a hand-held tool.  However, it can be difficult, if not impossible, for a worker to consistently duplicate exact work from one assembly to another assembly.  For example, assembly lines often require many threaded fasteners to be assembled using a torque gun at a single workstation.  While currently used control systems can count the number of times the torque gun reaches the required torque value, they cannot determine if all the fasteners were tightened, or if some were tightened twice, or if the fasteners were tightened in a specific sequence, leading to the possibility of manufacturing mistakes.  To overcome this drawback, researchers have developed a method and system that not only can determine whether a particular manufacturing operation is carried out, but also determine whether the operation was carried out at the correct location and/or in the correct sequence. The system also provides feedback about the task completion status and the quality of the finished product.

Advantage:
• Detects and prevents mistakes during the manufacturing process by tracking the position and operation of hand-held tools in real time and providing feedback in the event that the manufacturing process is not proceeding as prescribed.

Application:
Manufacturing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:

Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191233594Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:ManufacturingPatent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDevice to Determine Susceptibility to Root Lodginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19214Summary:
Researchers have developed a device that can be used to measure root lodging susceptibility in corn.

Description:
Corn is one of the most important and valuable crops grown in the US.  Because of its significance to agriculture, corn breeders strive to develop corn hybrids that are agronomically sound, with traits such as insect and disease resistance, tolerance for heat and drought, and high yield.  Mechanical harvesting of corn also demands that plants be uniform in growth rate, stand establishment, and size. In order for corn plants to stand tall and withstand various mechanical forces applied to the stalk, such as wind, rain, or harvesting equipment, it is important for the plant stalk to have good mechanical properties and be firmly anchored in the soil by its roots; traits such as stalk lodging and root lodging are related to the plant’s mechanical properties. Stalk lodging is breakage of the stalk below the ear while root lodging is where a plant leans away from the vertical access at a 30 degree angle or greater. Researchers have now developed a device that can be used to can be used to measure a corn hybrid’s susceptibility to root lodging earlier in the development of cycle of a new hybrid when fewer plants may be available for testing.  This device pushes on a corn stalk to simulate root lodging; it measures the vibration as force is exerted on the stalk and breakage occurs, and records the data. Thus, accurate comparisons among hybrids without the need to wait for wind or other environmental event to measure lodging are enabled. In addition, this handheld device is portable and easy to use, making it suitable for routine field testing.

Advantage:
• Enables testing for root lodging susceptibility earlier in the corn hybrid development cycle
• Allows for quantitative measurement of root lodging susceptibility and hybrid to hybrid comparisons
• Hand held and portable for easy field testing

Application:
Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodging

Other Patent:
Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926

Development Stage:
The device has been tested under a variety of soil conditions and plant maturity levels and has been shown to distinguish between strong and weak corn hybrids.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Stage0.png
Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 11:02:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192143589Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodgingOther Patent:Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926]]>Development Stage:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Correlating Push Force and Stalk Vibration to a Plant's Susceptibility to Root LodgingUtilityUnited States7,987,73512/577,32910/12/20098/2/201112/26/20295/5/20155/5/2015FalseAdvanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19133Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a tool for simplification of designing and assessing complex parts, termed Advanced Systems Design Suite (ASDS). 

Description:
Current  interfaces used for conceptual design complex products suffer from difficult to use interfaces, unnecessary inputs, and inability to handle the large amount of uncertainty present at this early stage of product design; moreover, these interfaces allow engineers to only investigate a small number of designs before moving onto more detailed phases of design.  To overcome these limitations, ISU researchers have developed ASDS, which can be used for initial product conceptualization with user-friendly interface that allows concepts to be created and assessed in minutes with a set of tools to compute center of gravity, tipping angle, wheel loading, and measurements.  In addition, full CAD models can be decimated and imported into ASDS for conceptual manipulation.  ASDS also includes a virtual reality component in which engineers and designers can view concepts in full immersive, stereoscopic 3D.

Advantage:
• Easy to use interface
• Pre-processed CAD files can be imported to evaluation and conceptualization
• Enables design concepts to be viewed in immersive VR environment
• Minimal expertise needed for use

Application:
Manufacturing; product lifecycle management

Development Stage:
Stage4.png
ASDS is ready for commercialization, and ISU is seeking licensees for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191334006Thu, 07 May 2015 08:01:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:Manufacturing; product lifecycle managementDevelopment Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMicroscope for Simultaneous Single Molecule AFM and Fluorescence Measurementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19117Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an integrated single molecule atomic force fluorescence microscope (smAFM-FM) that can perform multiple single molecule measurements.

Description:
Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy Transfer (FRET) and single molecule force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) are two widely used and powerful techniques that have advanced research in the biological sciences. However each of these techniques suffers from limitations in terms of the types of single molecule measurements they can perform.  For instance, it is difficult to examine structural changes in molecules as they interact using a stand-alone AFM, while when using FRET alone, it is difficult to monitor optical changes in materials when forces are applied.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microscope that combines a single molecule AFM-FRET approach to study molecules and nanoscale objects.  This new instrument enables multiple single molecule measurements, including AFM-FRET intensity and lifetime measurements, AFM-fluorescence intensity and spectral measurements, AFM-photon antibunching experiments, and AFM-Raman measurements.  The smAFM-FM has potential applications for life science research (such as determining the structure and dynamics of molecular interactions of biomolecules), drug discovery (such as direct observation of drug delivery and drug-target interactions in vitro and in cells or tissues), characterization of the optical properties of nanomaterials such as nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, nanotubes, etc., material science, and the optical MEMs industry (design of optical switches, pressure sensors, disk-drive, heads and biosensors). The utility of the smAFM-FM has been demonstrated by measuring the force dependence of the optical properties of CdS/CdSe tetrapod, an important semiconductor nanocrystal.

Advantage:
• Combines the features and benefits of AFM and FRET microscopy to apply forces on single molecules or nanoscale objects and simultaneously monitor their structure, dynamics and optical properties.

Application:
Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.

Development Stage:
Stage0.png
Proof of concept has been demonstrated using the smAFM-FM instrument to measure force-dependent optical properties of nano-scale objects, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:31 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191173855Thu, 07 May 2015 07:55:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Single molecule/nanoscale object measurements for research and industrial applications that include life science, drug discovery, material science, nanotechnology, and optical MEMS.Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740System, Apparatus, and Method for Simultaneous Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence MeasurementsUtilityUnited States8,656,51013/569,9278/8/20122/18/20148/8/20325/4/20156/21/2017FalsePneumatic Vibration Isolation Devicehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19106Summary:
Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

Description:
Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

Advantage:
• Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events
• Low cost
• Improves ride performance

Application:
Vehicle suspensions

References:
1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191063492Thu, 07 May 2015 07:54:53 GMTSummary:Researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device (LCPID) that can be used in conjunction with a vibration isolation platform technology to help reduce whole-body vibrations and their health consequences that workers may be subjected to when driving or operating equipment, trucks, or other vehicles.

]]>Description:Whole-body vibration is a physical occupational hazard in many workplaces. Workers typically subjected to this type vibration are operators or drivers of numerous kinds of vehicles used in agriculture, construction, highway trucking, and utility industries. Operators of the vehicles/equipment used in these industries are often subjected to extreme vibration environments for extended durations of time. The contemporary suspensions used on these vehicles are generally inadequate in providing the necessary vibration isolation for the operator, and can result in health problems such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and vascular disorders. In addition to the failure of current pneumatic suspension to adequately isolate vibrations from the occupant, many such suspensions are subject to occasional bottoming out and sling shot effects that cause jolts to the occupant or subjects them to high upward acceleration and travel. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a low cost pneumatic isolation device that mitigates the transmission of vibration and is particularly effective at controlling over-compression and over-extension modes of motion in suspensions.  The LCPID is also relatively easy to manufacture and is low cost, and can be used to improve ride performance.

]]>Advantage:Minimizes the occurrences of bottoming out and/or sling shot events ]]>Low cost ]]>Improves ride performance]]>Application:Vehicle suspensions

]]>References:1: Porumamilla, H., A. G. Kelkar, and J. M. 2008. Vogel. Modeling and verification of an innovative active pneumatic vibration isolation system. J. Dyn. Sys., Meas., Control 130(3), 031001.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Pneumatic Vibration Isolation DeviceUtilityUnited States8,302,94412/173,0637/15/200811/6/20129/6/20315/3/20154/8/2016FalseIce Dispenser for Refrigerator with Bottom Mount Freezerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19104

Description:
While for many years, the typical refrigerator included a top mounted freezer, refrigerators with a bottom freezer have become popular in recent years, as well as side by side refrigerator and freezer combinations.  Ice dispensers which are commonly found on the freezer door on side by side refrigerators have not been provide on the bottom mount refrigerators due to the lower position of the freezer. An ice dispenser has now been designed for refrigerators with a bottom mount freezer where an ice maker resides in the freezer compartment and an ice storage bin is in the refrigerator compartment. A shuttle driven by a motor-cable moves the ice cubes made by the ice dispenser in the freezer up into the ice bucket in the refrigerator automatically.

Application:
Home appliances

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]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191043012Thu, 07 May 2015 07:54:52 GMTDescription: ]]>While for many years, the typical refrigerator included a top mounted freezer, refrigerators with a bottom freezer have become popular in recent years, as well as side by side refrigerator and freezer combinations.  Ice dispensers which are commonly found on the freezer door on side by side refrigerators have not been provide on the bottom mount refrigerators due to the lower position of the freezer. An ice dispenser has now been designed for refrigerators with a bottom mount freezer where an ice maker resides in the freezer compartment and an ice storage bin is in the refrigerator compartment. A shuttle driven by a motor-cable moves the ice cubes made by the ice dispenser in the freezer up into the ice bucket in the refrigerator automatically.

]]>Application: ]]>Home appliances

]]>]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Ice Dispenser for Refrigerator with Bottom Mount FreezerUtilityUnited States7,065,97510/884,8987/6/20046/27/20067/6/20245/3/20158/4/2017False