Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:30:06 GMTThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:30:06 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversitySelective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Productshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19196Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for utilizing ozone for oxidation of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes that enables a rapid and controlled rate of catalysis and is also an environmentally friendly and versatile technology.

Description:
Ozone is recognized as a potent and effective oxidizing agent with numerous commercial uses, including use as an industrial oxidant and water treatment.  Building on research related to iron catalysis in oxidations by ozone, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an approach for selective oxidation in an environmentally friendly manner to obtain industrially important aldehydes and ketones. Because this approach uses mild reaction conditions and eliminates toxic waste compounds, it may have utility for the production of aldehydes and ketones, whose versatile properties make them valuable starting materials for numerous products.

Advantage:
• Rapid and controlled rate of catalysis
• Environmentally friendly: ozone naturally decomposes to oxygen)
• Versatile: may be used for any applications and/or substrates for which ozone is used as an oxidant)

Application:
Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones.

References:
"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

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This technology has been tested and proven effective, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

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Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191963901Tue, 21 Nov 2017 07:47:02 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized ProductsUtilityUnited States8,507,73013/434,9003/30/20128/13/20133/30/20325/5/201511/13/2017FalseAlignment Promoted in Heat Treatable Magnets Through Application of External Applied Magnetic Field at the Start of Binder-Assisted Moldinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26602Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to produce sintered, final-shape magnets with high density and aligned microstructure.  The resulting permanent magnets feature higher energy product and improved remanence versus standard processing, with improved performance in motors and generators.

Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to create AlNiCo magnets in near final shape with improved energy product and remanence versus magnets produced without using directional solidification or zone refinement.  Magnets resulting from this process are characterized by highly controlled and aligned microstructure in the solid state.  Magnet alloy precursor powder is aligned while being added to the mold, with compression molding locking the aligned particles in place.  The resulting microstructural template for grain growth persists through a thermal de-binding treatment and sintering of the magnet.

Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

Advantage:
• Near net-shape production of permanent magnets with high anisotropy and energy product.
• Compatible with techniques to enhance alignment through application of uni-axial loading during sintering.
• De-binding and sintering removes binder material, leaving a highly-dense anisotropic sintered magnet.

Application:
Permanent magnets, especially for motors and electrical generators.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/266024695Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTSummary:

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Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNovel Protein Synthases for the Production of Bi-Functional Fatty Acidshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21833Summary:
ISU researchers have developed biocatalysts that make bi-functionalized molecules (fatty acids) and a recombinant bacterial expression system.

Description:
Fatty acids normally synthesized in biological systems have only one functional group, carboxylic acid, which is found at the alpha end of the molecule. Bi-functional fatty acids, where there is also a functional group at the omega end of the molecule, are desirable for industrial applications, but are produced by only a few natural systems and at levels that are too low for practical replacement of petroleum-based sources of monomers.  Approaches that enable larger scale production of bi-functional fatty acids will help drive the use of bio-based chemicals. The technology addresses the need for efficient production of bi-functionalized fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the bio-based production of polymers, surfactants, and various specialty chemicals and has the potential to serve as the basis of development of tailored enzymes that are designed to incorporate different functionalities into fatty acids to produce a range of bi-functionalized precursor molecules.

Advantage:
• Produces bi-functional fatty acids
• Replacement for petroleum-based sources of monomers
• Serves a precursor for a wide variety of specialty chemicals, polymers, and surfactants
• Very lucrative market

Application:
Bio-based chemicals, Specialty chemicals

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:41:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218334083Wed, 15 Nov 2017 07:15:24 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:Bio-based chemicals, Specialty chemicalsPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials and Methods for Characterizing and Using KASIII for Production of Bi-Functional Fatty AcidsUtilityUnited States9,809,80414/762,7917/29/201511/7/20177/29/203511/15/201711/21/2017FalsePropane Dehydrogenation over Carbide Catalysts with High Selectivityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26231Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a propane dehydrogenation method to transform shale gas efficiently to propylene, which allows a new route to the second most abundant polymer, polypropylene. This is the first example of using carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

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Description:
Shale gas contains large amounts of propane gas. As dehydrogenation of propane into propylene represents an enormous market opportunity, propane dehydrogenation catalysts have been highly valued and extensively researched. Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated that carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

Advantage:
• Significantly higher selectivity
• Low by-product formation
• Much reduced cost compared with current commercial catalysts

• Consistent conversion rate with the best commercial catalysts

Application:
Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Wed, 13 Sep 2017 13:12:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/262314665Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:04 GMTSummary:carbide nanostructures for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane, propylene selectivity was shown to be greater than literature state of the art catalysts, as high as 95%. Conversion rate is consistent with the best commercial catalysts.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:carbide nanostructures have state of art selectivity and conversion percentage compared to the literature analogues for propane dehydrogenation. Their results have shown that the metal-carbide composite alloy catalysts significantly increases propylene selectivity (98%) of propane dehydrogenation reaction compared to pure Pt catalysts (85%) at similar conversion. ISURF #4665 may represent the best available catalyst and most selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation.

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]]>Application:Carbide catalysts will be widely used for propane dehydrogenation.Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseMethod for Synthesizing Magnet Alloys via Thermal Spray Using Recycled Materialhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26120Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to recycle rare earth elements (REE) waste from magnet processing as well as REE from end-of-life magnets using a very simple and economical process.  The process involves creating new magnetic material through a thermal spray technique, resulting in magnets with slightly lower magnetic performance (compared to sintered or bonded magnets produced from virgin material) but with much greater flexibility in magnet geometry and thickness than conventionally produced magnets.

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Description:
Rare earth magnets play an essential role in many alternative energy technologies, electric cars, and in consumer electronic devices, but manufacturing of the magnets results in a substantial amount of waste REE material that is often not economical to recycle.  Similarly, recycling of REE from end of life products, in particular magnets from hard disk drives, is rarely pursued because of the economics of the processes.

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

Advantage:
• Low cost recycling method
• Gap magnet production with potential for unique and thin geometries
• Simple and economical processing

Application:
Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet material

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]]>Fri, 01 Sep 2017 10:42:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/261204605Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:01 GMTSummary:

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Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to recycle magnet swarf and end-of-life magnet materials by producing new magnet materials through a thermal spray process.  The resultant magnet materials fall into the performance regime of the so-called “gap magnets”, with performance and expected cost between low-performance ferrous magnets and high-priced rare earth permanent magnets.  Importantly, using a plasma spray for deposition of the magnet materials allows for unique and thin geometries that would be difficult to produce using conventional manufacturing techniques.

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]]>Application:Recycling of waste and end-of-life magnets into gap magnet materialDesc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseHighly porous thermoelectric nanocomposite with low thermal conductivityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25632Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for making a thermoelectric nanocomposites using limited materials.

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Description:
ISU researches have developed a method of making porous bismuth telluride selenide (Bi2(Te,Se)3), a superior replacement in thermoelectric devices to bismuth telluride(Bi2Te3). Compared to Bi2Te3, the ternary Bi2(Te, Se)3 systems have superior thermal conductivity and a higher thermoelectric figure of merit. This method is easily scalable and uses less material than other Bi2(Te, Se)3 ternary systems. The resulting porous material maintains the same performance as the 100% dense material.

Advantage:
• Uses limited materials
• Higher performance than bismuth telluride
• Maintains same performance as dense bismuth telluride selenide analogues

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]]>Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:15:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/256324637Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:28 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:]]>]]>]]>Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseMetabolically Engineered Membrane Proteins for Improved Membrane Integrity and Production of Fatty Acids in Escherichia colihttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23726Summary:
ISU researchers developed a method of increasing the yield of high value fatty acids produced by E. coli

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Description:
Increasing productivity in the fermentative production of chemicals often hits a ceiling in product titer, either as a result of suppression in expression of enzymes necessary for the production pathway or in cell mortality due to high concentrations of the product itself. While removal of the product from the fermentation broth can address this “feedback” effect, an alternative and potentially less expensive solution to the problem is to modify the organism to be able to tolerate higher product concentrations. ISU researchers have used a combination of gene deletion and up-regulation to increase fatty acid titter by 53% compared to the non-engineered controls without negatively impacting cell viability.

Advantage:
• Greatly increased titter
• Inexpensive
• Uses existing fermentation systems

Application:
Fatty acid production from alternative sources

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]]>Wed, 21 Dec 2016 14:00:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237264529Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:21 GMTSummary:E. coli

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]]>Application:Fatty acid production from alternative sourcesDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseOxy-Sulfide-Nitride Mixed Network Former High Ion Conductivity Solid Electrolyteshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23708Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a compound to replace the liquid electrolyte that is used in lithium ion batteries with a safer solid matrix for use in a sodium ion battery alternative.

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Description:
Lithium ion batteries have become ubiquitous in our society, powering almost all cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid cars. The high power density and low weight has made these batteries attractive despite questionable stability. When these batteries fail, the results can be spectacular, including highly publicized catastrophic failures that result in fire. A safer more stable battery, that is capable of similar performance to current lithium ion battery technology, is therefore desirable. One solution for increasing stability is to replace the liquid electrolyte with a solid medium. Two commonly studied solid electrolyte types are all-oxide or all-sulfide. Typically, all-oxide solid electrolytes are poor conductors, however they can be very stable. In contrast, all-sulfide electrolytes are highly conductive but chemically unstable and therefore expensive to manufacture. ISU researchers have developed a family of compounds to be used as a solid electrolyte for sodium batteries that utilizes a mixture of oxides and sulfides, doped with nitrogen, that combines the advantages of the all-oxide and all-sulfide alternatives. The resulting compounds provide a safe and high performing solid matrix.

Advantage:
• High conductivity
• Stable
• Low cost of production

Application:
Batteries, energy storage

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:24:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237084451Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:20 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:Application:Batteries, energy storagePatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAcid-Free Dissolution and Separation of Rare-earth Metalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23707Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to effectively recycle rare earth elements through simple REDOX reactions allowing for aqueous processing. This replaces the need for dangerous and environmentally unfriendly acids.

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Description:
Rare earth elements (REE) have seen a sharp increase in use in a number of technical materials such as high density and high temperature tolerant permanent magnets, lamp phosphors, catalysts, rechargeable batteries and many other technologies related to a transition to a greener economy. With China controlling more than 90% of REE output and increasingly stringent export quotas, the world at large faces a risk of supply disruption. Recycling of spent materials is therefore crucially important. ISU researchers have developed a novel approach to recycling REEs (particularly neodymium and dysprosium) by dissolving REE containing metal scrap in a reducing aqueous solution. After simple processing of the solubilized material, pure REE-oxides can be recovered. Recovery yield of the REE-oxides are typically greater than 95%. The use of aqueous reduction to dissolve the REE replaces the need for environmentally unfriendly acid use.

Advantage:
• Cost effective and time efficient
• Environmentally friendly
• Expected to scale efficiently
• Applicable to small or large scale operation

Application:
Recycling rare earth elements

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:05:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237074443Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:19 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:Application:Recycling rare earth elementsPatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNano-patterning Methods Including: (1) Patterning of Nanophotonic Structures at Optical Fiber Tip For Refractive Index Sensing and (2) Plasmonic Crystal Incorporating Graphene Oxide for Detection of Gaseous/Aqueous compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23693Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process that relates to nano-patterning at the tip of an optic fiber for waveguide and remote sensing functionalities.  The invention includes techniques of nanopatterning that can be less complex as well as high resolution and rapid. Using these developments, researchers have created a new sensor built on a plasmonic crystal structure coated with graphene oxide (GO)---Other gas/liquid specific coatings can be supported.  The sensor allows selective detection of different species in gaseous/aqueous form through the tuning of the refractive index via the design of the nanostructure, and its modulation under exposure to varying concentrations of species.

Description:
The ability of creating high-resolution nanopatterns on the tip of optical fiber has a great potential to open up many possibilities of realizing applications involving remote sensing based on optical refractive index modulation with different detection devices such as diffraction gratings, photonic crystals, and nanophotonic resonators.  This invention is a simple and efficient method to inscribe high-resolution nanophotonic patterns on the cleaved facets of optical fibers using UV assisted nanoimprinting lithography.  Using this innovative process, researchers at ISU have developed a new sensor built on a plasmonic crystal structure coated with GO---Other gas/liquid specific coatings can be supported.  The sensor allows selective detection of different species through the tuning of the refractive index via the design of the nanostructure, and its modulation under exposure to varying concentrations of the species.

Advantage:
• A simplified and efficient process to fabricate nanopatterns on optical fiber tip
• Utilization of the guided mode resonance (GMR) structure to monitor surrounding refractive index changes
• Allows selective detection of different species in gaseous/aqueous form with subtle variations in concentratio
• Selective coating used for to allow surface binding and refractive index modulatio
• Validated by the Principle Component Analysis based pattern recognition algorithm
• Demonstration that graphene oxide coated plasmonic design provides both sensitivity and specificity to gas species

Application:
Agriculture, environmental and health monitoring

References:
Microfluidic impedimetric sensor for soil nitrate detection using graphene oxide and conductive nanofibers enabled sensing interface, Kumar, et. al., September 22, 2016

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 13 Dec 2016 12:09:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/236934453Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:18 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Microfluidic impedimetric sensor for soil nitrate detection using graphene oxide and conductive nanofibers enabled sensing interface, Kumar, et. al., September 22, 2016

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSilica Encapsulation of Ureolytic Bacteria for Self-healing of Cement-Based Compositeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23692Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method to encapsulate bacteria for incorporation into concrete as the basis for self-healing of cracks.

Description:
Microbially-Induced Carbonate Precipitation has been well studied as a mechanism for the surface repair of concrete structures and soil stabilization.  Use of MICP in concrete mixture as a built-in repair system, however, has been slow to develop because of the difficulty of preparing microorganisms for long-term survival in cured concrete.
ISU researchers have developed a method to encapsulate ureolytic bacteria in a silica shell before freeze-drying, providing a protective shell that is compatible with the calcium silicates of Portland cement.  Survival of the freeze dried bacteria in cured concrete and utility of the encapsulated bacteria to induce carbonate precipitation in fractured cement paste has been demonstrated.

Advantage:
• Demonstrated healing of stressed concrete samples
• Cost-effective encapsulation of bacteria
• Bio-friendly

Application:
Self-healing of concrete

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 13 Dec 2016 12:09:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/236924465Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers have developed a method to encapsulate ureolytic bacteria in a silica shell before freeze-drying, providing a protective shell that is compatible with the calcium silicates of Portland cement.  Survival of the freeze dried bacteria in cured concrete and utility of the encapsulated bacteria to induce carbonate precipitation in fractured cement paste has been demonstrated.

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrophoretic Soil Nutrient Sensor for Agriculturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23550Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an in situ, electrophoresis based microfluidics ion nutrient sensor for the detection of anions in a soil solution extracted from the soil.  The sensors offers a new capability to analyze concentrations of various anions as well as cations, in automated extracted soil solutions with both high specificity and sensitivity. It includes the microfluidics for the automated extraction of soil solution.

Description:
Demands for on-site, in situ, real-time sensing exists for site-specific nutrient management in agriculture, where 30-40% of applied nutrients are wasted due to a lack of knowledge of site-specific plant needs, and those nutrients act as pollutants to waterways and the atmosphere.  This sensing system developed at ISU integrates a microfluidics device for sample intake and filtration, excitation source for generation of an electric potential, electrophoresis microchip for ion separation and readout mechanism to wirelessly transmit data.

Advantage:
• In situ electrophoresis based label-free inorganic ion sensor for detecting soil nutrient components
• Automatic sample collection and preparation
• Rapid measurement and read out to users and operators via wireless interface
• Can be utilized to inform a subsequent action, such as controlling a variable rate applicator
• Technology can be adopted for other applications as environmental/health/food monitoring

Application:
Precision agriculture or environmental monitoring where nutrient sensing is require

References:
Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:57:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235504454Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:15 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMaking paraffin-like coating materials from soybean oilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23520Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a paraffin wax substitute.

Description:
Corrugated cardboard coated in wax is a typical container for shipping many products.  The wax coating offers water repellence and some chemical resistance that cardboard boxes alone don’t offer. The wax for these boxes are typically petroleum derived and not able to be repulped and recycled and are slow to degrade, causing a significant source of waste. With the price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, a biorenewable cost-effective, high performing wax is desirable. To meet this market need, ISU researchers have developed a new material derived from soybean oil with properties similar to paraffin wax.

Advantage:
• Obtained from natural and renewable sources
• Comparable melting point, hydrophobicity, and hardness to paraffin wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:11:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235204555Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:13 GMTSummary:

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]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseLignocol: Low Ash, Low Sulfur Coal Replacement from Fast Pyrolysis of Biomasshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22982Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process for taking phenolic oils from lignocellulosic biomass and curing them to obtain a coal substitute.

Description:
This technology involves the curing of phenolic oils derived from pyrolysis into a material suitable for combustion as a coal-supplement or as a coal replacement for steam generation. Stage Fraction 1 and 2 materials are processed by water washing to remove sugars and are subsequently heated by waste process heat to a hardened form. This cured and hardened material is then ground to a consistency comparable to coal and tested as a combustion fuel.

Advantage:
• Derived from renewable sources
• Can be overall carbon neutral
• Can be used with existing infrastructure
• Can be used as either a 100% replacement or a co-fire fuel in coal boilers

Application:
Combustion fuel

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:04:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/229824429Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:10 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLow Cost and High Performance Fuel Cells Fed with Biomass-Derived Feedstockhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22981Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a high performance low cost biomass fuel cell technology that can be directly fed with biomass wastes/residuals, biorefinery or pyrolytic streams as fuels.

Description:
This technology is a fuel cell that can transform biomass wastes into useable energy at low cost. The membrane, anode and cathode catalysts are all designed to lower the overall cost of the system while maintaining performance. The fuel cell is an anion exchange membrane type fuel cell which uses a low cost PTFE membrane. The anode catalyst is a non-precious metal or non-metal. The cathode catalyst, while still a precious metal, is low loading and supported on carbon.

Advantage:
• Operated at low temperature (e.g. <80°C) and ambient oxygen or air
• Employs low loading of precious metal anode catalyst
• Utilizes very inexpensive porous PTFE membrane
• Can be directly fed with crude biomass/biorefinery/pyrolytic feedstock

Application:
High performance biomass fuel cells

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:04:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/229814364Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:09 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseCopper-Alkali Metal Secondary Batteryhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22980Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new battery chemistry suitable for secondary energy storage, including storage of electricity produced by renewable energy sources such as solar and wind generation.  These batteries offer comparable energy density to lithium-based batteries, but feature a liquid metal anode, avoiding the dendrite formation and related safety issues of lithium batteries.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have recently developed a new battery chemistry which combines a copper metal cathode with an alkali metal solution at the anode.  The metal solution can be kept in the liquid state at lower temperatures than other molten salt batteries (such as sodium-sulfur and sodium-nickel batteries), improving system efficiency and lowering the cost of containment materials.  The batteries utilize a solid alkali ion conducting separator and aqueous catholytes of the alkali metal salts.

Advantage:
• Abundant and cheap anode materials
• Lower temperature operation and less corrosive than other sodium-based batteries
• Safe operation

Application:
Secondary energy storage

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:04:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/229804436Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:08 GMTSummary:

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA Novel Vegetable Oil-Based Material as Substitute for Carnauba Waxhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22573Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a new material with a high hardness comparable to that of palm-based carnauba wax and a much higher melting point.

Description:
In North America, the consumption of wax is around three billion pounds per year with an associated vale in excess of three billion dollars. Markets of waxes are diverse, ranging from simple fuel in candles to practical applications such as coating in the paper and packaging industry. The largest market of wax remains in the packaging area, which are mostly derived from petroleum-based paraffin waxes. However, because of the increasing price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, there is considerable interest for cost-effective, higher performing and naturally sourced alternatives like carnauba wax. To address this issue, ISU researchers developed a new material derived from soybean oil that has superior properties to petroleum paraffin wax with a high hardness, high melting point and good surface finish.

Advantage:
• Natural and renewable
• High hardness
• Higher melting point than carnauba wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles

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]]>Thu, 28 Jul 2016 12:19:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/225734482Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA Wearable Microwave Meta-Skin with Tunable Frequency and Cloaking Effectshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22187Summary:
Electromagnetic applications, such as frequency tuning, shielding, and scattering suppression

Description:
The device is a flexible and stretchable metamaterial-based “skin” or meta-skin with tunable frequency selective and cloaking effects in microwave frequency regime. The meta-skin is composed of an array of liquid metallic split ring resonators (SRRs) embedded in a stretchable elastomer. When stretched, the meta-skin performs as a tunable frequency selective surface with a wide resonance frequency tuning range. When wrapped around a curved dielectric material, the meta-skin functions as a flexible “cloaking” surface to significantly suppress scattering from the surface of the dielectric material along different directions. This meta-skin technology will benefit many electromagnetic applications, such as frequency tuning, shielding, and scattering suppression.

Advantage:
• Numerous potential applications
• Tunable to accommodate various frequencies
• Cost effective

Application:
Flexible circuit production

References:
1. From Flexible and Stretchable Meta-Atom to Metamaterial: A Wearable Microwave Meta-Skin with Tunable Frequency Selective and Cloaking Effects. Siming Yang, Peng Liu, Mingda Yang, Qiugu Wang, Jiming Song & Liang Dong. Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 21921 (2016)

2. Tunable meta-atom using liquid metal embedded in stretchable polymer. Peng Liu, Siming Yang, Aditya Jain, Qiugu Wang, Huawei Jiang, Jiming Song, Thomas Koschny, Costas M. Soukoulis and Liang Dong. J. Appl. Phys. 118, 014504 (2015)

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:19:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/221874488Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:25 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:From Flexible and Stretchable Meta-Atom to Metamaterial: A Wearable Microwave Meta-Skin with Tunable Frequency Selective and Cloaking Effects. Siming Yang, Peng Liu, Mingda Yang, Qiugu Wang, Jiming Song & Liang Dong. Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 21921 (2016)

2. Tunable meta-atom using liquid metal embedded in stretchable polymer. Peng Liu, Siming Yang, Aditya Jain, Qiugu Wang, Huawei Jiang, Jiming Song, Thomas Koschny, Costas M. Soukoulis and Liang Dong. J. Appl. Phys. 118, 014504 (2015)]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseApplication of Mild Pretreatment and Low Temperature, Low Pressure Hydrogenation to Liquefy and Stabilize Lignin Streamshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22093Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a cost effective alternative route to depolymerizing lignin apart from pyrolysis.

Description:
Lignin is the second most abundant natural polymer in the world (behind cellulose), and consists of a variety of different phenol-based monomer units. Despite the potential usefulness of the phenolic compounds as a chemical feedstock or for transportation fuels, lignin is rarely utilized for anything more than as a combustion fuel for process heat. The technology creates an alternative route to depolymerizing lignin apart from pyrolysis. It is a process in which lignin is treated with low cost, readily abundant chemicals, followed by low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogenation to stabilize the monomer units. This treatment lowers costs both in terms of capital investment (low pressure vessels, relatively benign chemicals) and operating costs compared to other methods.

Advantage:
• Inexpensive reagents
• Low operating expenses
• Minimal capital input
• Greatly reduced reaction temperature and pressure

Application:
Bio-based oils

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 26 May 2016 11:20:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/220934446Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Bio-based oilsPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseUse of linseed oil-derived materials as rejuvenators of vacuum tower bottom and reclaimed asphalt pavementhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21827Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed formulations to use bio-derived materials as flux and/or rejuvenators for using vacuum tower bottoms (VTB) and reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in warm mix asphalt.

Description:
Heated bodied linseed oil and partially hydrogenated heated bodied linseed oil were used as flux and/or rejuvenators for asphalt binders made from vacuum tower bottoms (VTB). These bio-derived materials were able to improve the binder performance grade from 76-10 to PG 70-22 and PG 64-22 grades. As VTB is at a distinct price advantage over other binder materials, use of this material as a flux results in a significant decrease in costs.

Advantage:
• Large improvement in usability of VTB as an asphalt binder
• Applicable to warm mix asphalt that includes RAP at a lower price than other rejuvenators
• Bio-derived materials

Application:
Warm mix asphalt paving

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218274419Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePlant Protein and Biochar Fertilizerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21701Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a new, bio-char-based fertilizer that solves the problem of biochar application and incorporated additional biorenewable components for soil conditioning and enhanced nutrient availability.

Description:
Consumer demands for environmentally friendly products continue to rise. Public concern over pollution and other negative environmental impacts from chemical production have created a great interest in alternative chemical products produced from bio-based feedstocks and end-use chemical products that incorporate both bio-based chemicals and green chemistry principles.

The technology involves the use of soy flour and biochar materials to form a bio-derived fertilizer with soil conditioner. Recent studies have demonstrated that biochar can retain fertilizing chemicals, enhance plant growth, improve cation exchange capacity, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions when used as a soil additive. Previous research by the inventors has shown that soy-based plastics can be compounded with biochar to serve as an effective fertilizer and soil conditioner. The soy protein provides nutritional effects and stabilizes the biochar material. Biochar is a fine, black powder that cannot be spread onto soil without the addition of a binder or carrier. It is not possible to dispense the fine biochar powder directly because the wind would carry the powder uncontrollably. We have shown that it is possible to use pellets produced from soy plastic and bio-char to disperse this bio-based fertilizer easily and effectively.

Advantage:
• Environmentally Friendly
• Less Expensive Feedstocks
• Efficient Without Synthetic Fertilizers
• Competitive Production Costs

Application:
Lawn and Garden Fertilizer

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:57:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217014288Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The technology involves the use of soy flour and biochar materials to form a bio-derived fertilizer with soil conditioner. Recent studies have demonstrated that biochar can retain fertilizing chemicals, enhance plant growth, improve cation exchange capacity, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions when used as a soil additive. Previous research by the inventors has shown that soy-based plastics can be compounded with biochar to serve as an effective fertilizer and soil conditioner. The soy protein provides nutritional effects and stabilizes the biochar material. Biochar is a fine, black powder that cannot be spread onto soil without the addition of a binder or carrier. It is not possible to dispense the fine biochar powder directly because the wind would carry the powder uncontrollably. We have shown that it is possible to use pellets produced from soy plastic and bio-char to disperse this bio-based fertilizer easily and effectively.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAn Improved Synthsis of Coumalic Acid and Malic Acid from a Common Intermediatehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21071Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new synthesis route for coumalic acid from malic acid which uses far less corrosive conditions.

Description:
Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of the most widely used polymers used today.  PET is formed through a polycondensation reaction of ethylene terephthalate, which is itself a product of a reaction between ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid.  While the common route to produce terephthalic acid is by the oxidation of para-xylene, it is possible to produce the terephthalic acid from biorenewable sources, in particular from derivatives of coumalic acid.

Iowa State University researchers have developed a new synthetic route for coumalic acid from malic acid.  This new method eliminates the use of fuming sulfuric acid as a reagent, and instead uses dichloroethane as a solvent for the malic acid and a weak acid as the reagent.  These much more moderate reaction conditions should make scale up for production of coumalic acid much more feasible.  In addition, other products such as fumaric acid may also be synthesized by adjusting the reaction conditions.

Advantage:
• Mild reaction conditions
• Readily scalable

Application:
Biorenewable chemical for many uses, including textiles, beverage containers, and thermoformed parts

References:
1. G.A. Kraus et al.,  “Aromatics from Pyrones: Terephthalic Acid and Related Aromatics From Methyl Coumalate”, RSC Advances, 3, pp. 12721-12725, 2013.

2. J.J. Lee and G.A. Kraus “Divergent Diels-Alder Methodology from Methyl Coumalate toward Functionalized Aromatics”, Tetrahedron Letters, 54, pp. 2366-2368, 2013.

3. PCT publication

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 12:58:27 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210714029Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Iowa State University researchers have developed a new synthetic route for coumalic acid from malic acid.  This new method eliminates the use of fuming sulfuric acid as a reagent, and instead uses dichloroethane as a solvent for the malic acid and a weak acid as the reagent.  These much more moderate reaction conditions should make scale up for production of coumalic acid much more feasible.  In addition, other products such as fumaric acid may also be synthesized by adjusting the reaction conditions.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. G.A. Kraus et al.,  “Aromatics from Pyrones: Terephthalic Acid and Related Aromatics From Methyl Coumalate”, RSC Advances, 3, pp. 12721-12725, 2013.

2. J.J. Lee and G.A. Kraus “Divergent Diels-Alder Methodology from Methyl Coumalate toward Functionalized Aromatics”, Tetrahedron Letters, 54, pp. 2366-2368, 2013.

3. PCT publication]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Synthesis of Coumalic AcidUtilityUnited States9,617,23614/892,29811/19/20154/11/201711/19/20356/21/201711/13/2017FalseA Novel Facultative Methylotroph, Methylocystis daltona SB2http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21066Description:
Methylocystis daltona SB2 (SB2) is a novel facultative methanotroph capable of utilizing methane and other multi-carbon substrates for growth has been identified.  SB2 constitutively expresses methane monooxygenase, enabling bioremediation of cholorinated solvents, enhanced removal of methane from the atmosphere, and for controlling emission of methane from multiple sources, including landfills and concentrated animal feeding operations.
SB2 also produces a novel chalkophore, or copper-binding compound, and may be used for removal of metals from aqueous systems, removal of mercury from gaseous waste streams, and the production of nanoparticles from precious metals (gold, rhodium, platinum and palladium).
This is the first example of a prokaryotic system capable of these functions.

Advantage:
• Versatile
• More effective than current bioremediation solutions

Application:
• Remediation of chlorinated solvents
• Remediation of methane from the atmosphere; controlling methane emission from landfills, animal production facilities, etc.
• Removal of metals from aqueous solutions
• Removal of mercury from gaseous waste streams
• Production of nanoparticles from precious metals

References:
N. Bandow et al. “Spectral and copper binding properties of methanobactin from the facultative methanotroph Methylocystis strain SB2”, Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, 110, pp.72-82, 2012.  DOI: 10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2012.02.002. Epub 2012 Feb 12. PubMed PMID: 22504273.

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210663802Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:41 GMTDescription:SB2 also produces a novel chalkophore, or copper-binding compound, and may be used for removal of metals from aqueous systems, removal of mercury from gaseous waste streams, and the production of nanoparticles from precious metals (gold, rhodium, platinum and palladium).
This is the first example of a prokaryotic system capable of these functions.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:• Remediation of methane from the atmosphere; controlling methane emission from landfills, animal production facilities, etc.
• Removal of metals from aqueous solutions
• Removal of mercury from gaseous waste streams
• Production of nanoparticles from precious metals

]]>References:Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Methylocystis Strain SB2 Materials and MethodsUtilityUnited States8,629,23913/198,6698/4/20111/14/20148/4/203112/8/201511/13/2017FalseA new lipids/phospholipids extraction method with green solventshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21065Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a method to remove lipids and phospholipids from egg yolks. This technology addresses the egg processing industry, particularly for those processors who are interested in separating out egg constituents to be used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics applications.

Description:
The technology egg yolk solids and liquid are injected into the solvent liquid whereby the egg protein is “texturized” and lipid extraction occurs simultaneously. By injecting the material into the solvent, a high surface area to volume ratio is maintained, lipid extraction occurs rapidly, and the textured protein is easily separated from the solvent.

Advantage:
• Rapid extraction at room temperature
• Uses “green” solvents that are non-toxic
• Reduces energy costs by up to 25%
• Addresses large market

Application:
Egg processing / separation

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210654286Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLow Temperature Upgrading and Stabilization of Lignin-derived Phenolic Oligomers in Bio-Oilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21054Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for upgrading of reactive bio-oil without excess char production or fouling of catalysts.

Description:
Bio-oils from pyrolysis operations are complex mixtures of reactive chemicals, and resist techniques conventionally used in the petrochemical refining industry to upgrade crude oil products. The high reactivity of the bio-oil is due to an abundance of unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds as well as a prevalence of carbonyl groups. These tend to react with one another when exposed to high temperatures and active catalysts, resulting in polymerization of the bio-oil compounds into moderate molecular weight polymers that are of little use to the transportation fuel industry.  In this respect, the bio-oils tend to behave in a fashion similar to vegetable oils, which also tend to have some level of unsaturated carbon bonds and carbonyl groups. Hydrogenation of vegetable oils tends to be performed at much lower temperatures and pressures than do the alkene molecules in crude oil.
Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for the successful hydrogenation of the phenolic-based molecules of bio-oil to prepare them for further processing using more standard petrochemical reactions. The reaction conditions used for this upgrading are at low temperatures and pressures.  Mass yields using this process were as high as 99%.

Advantage:
• Enables bio-oil to be used as a drop-in substitute for petrochemical processing
• Milder conditions – lower temperature and pressure reduce operating expenses

Application:
Renewable Transportation fuels; renewable chemical processing

References:
1. M.R. Rover et al., “Stabilization of bio-oils using low temperature, low pressure hydrogenation”, Fuel, 153, pp. 224-230, 2015. 

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0291892

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:53:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210544214Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University researchers have developed a process for the successful hydrogenation of the phenolic-based molecules of bio-oil to prepare them for further processing using more standard petrochemical reactions. The reaction conditions used for this upgrading are at low temperatures and pressures.  Mass yields using this process were as high as 99%.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. M.R. Rover et al., “Stabilization of bio-oils using low temperature, low pressure hydrogenation”, Fuel, 153, pp. 224-230, 2015. 

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0291892

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePyrolysis of extracted lignin in a continuous reactorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21049Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a pretreatment for extracted lignin that allows it to be effectively pyrolyzed.

Description:
Agricultural biomass is largely made up of three polymers: cellulose (made from C6 sugars), hemicellulose (predominantly C5 sugars), and lignin, consisting of substituted aromatic groups. As the second most abundant natural polymer on the planet, lignin has the potential to be a bio-renewable source for transportation fuels and specialties chemicals.  Attempts to utilize fast pyrolysis to depolymerize lignin to its monomer units have been hindered by its properties: lignin readily melts at temperatures below those used for pyrolysis, resulting in rapidly clogged reactor vessels.
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple and cost effective pretreatment step which addresses the processability of lignin for fast pyrolysis. The treating consists of exposing the lignin to mono-and di-basic chemicals, including NaOH, LiOH, Mg(OH)2, and Ca(OH)2. This process binds the reactive groups, but does not depolymerize the lignin. Pretreatment with these chemicals allows for continuous operation of a fluidized bed pyrolyzer without clogging the reactor vessels.

Advantage:
• Treatment allows for continuous pyrolysis of lignin
• Cost effective

Application:
Biorenewable source for transportation fuels and chemicals

References:
S. Zhou et al., “The use of calcium hydroxide pretreatment to overcome agglomeration of technical lignin during fast pyrolysis”, Green Chemistry, 17, pp. 4748-4759, 2015.

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Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:24:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210494390Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:29 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple and cost effective pretreatment step which addresses the processability of lignin for fast pyrolysis. The treating consists of exposing the lignin to mono-and di-basic chemicals, including NaOH, LiOH, Mg(OH)2, and Ca(OH)2. This process binds the reactive groups, but does not depolymerize the lignin. Pretreatment with these chemicals allows for continuous operation of a fluidized bed pyrolyzer without clogging the reactor vessels.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:S. Zhou et al., “The use of calcium hydroxide pretreatment to overcome agglomeration of technical lignin during fast pyrolysis”, Green Chemistry, 17, pp. 4748-4759, 2015.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21045Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed tackifiers from biorenewable sources that exhibit a maximum tack at approximately 80˚C.

Description:
Tackifiers are important components of adhesive formulas, providing the stickiness or tack to the adhesive.  ISURF #04118 describes the initial synthesis of tackifiers from isosorbide and cyclic anhydrides to produce compounds with maximum tack between -20˚C to 40˚C (depending on the choice of anhydride).  ISURF #04346 builds upon this work by creating short oligomers of these tackifiers, resulting in maximum tack performance at 80˚C.

Advantage:
• Cost competitive with hydrocarbon-based resins; cost-advantaged versus other natural resins
• Bio-based with abundant supply of starting materials

Application:
Tackifiers for hot melt adhesives

References:
References: 1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:58:23 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210454346Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861
]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractanthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21024Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:57:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210244391Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rare earth elementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21023Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:50:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210234150Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:13 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseChemical Separation of Terbium Oxidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20985Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive and environmentally-friendly method to separate terbium oxide from other trivalent rare earth oxides.

Description:
According to the recent U.S. Department of Energy report “Critical Materials Strategy”, terbium ranks amongst the five most critical rare earth elements (along with dysprosium, neodymium, europium and yttrium).  Unfortunately, these heavy rare earth elements can be difficult to separate from one another because of their chemical similarity.  Current separation methods contain multistage processes which often utilize hazardous reagents, resulting in high capital and operating costs to obtain these important elements.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

Advantage:
• Effective separation of Tb4O7 from other heavy rare earth element oxides (greater than 99.5% purity)
• Environmentally friendly – water based with no hazardous chemicals
• Cost effective – readily sourced and disposed of mild acids, minimal number of stages reduces capital costs
• Fast reaction rate

Application:
Recycling and purification of terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other sources

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:03 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209854351Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSelective Chemical Separation of Rare-Earth Oxalateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20984Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a cost effective step that easily separates rare earth oxalates into a light rare earth stream and a heavy rare earth stream.

Description:
For many rare earth ores, the percentage of the valuable heavy rare earths (in particular, terbium, europium, dysprosium, yttrium and gadolinium) in the ore is very low, making separation and recovery of these elements from the other rare earths not cost-effective.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that can be added on to conventional ore processing that readily separates rare earth oxalates into two streams, one containing the light rare earths (La – Sm) and the other containing heavy rare earths (Gd – Y).  This one step process requires no special equipment and minimal capital investment.  The process is water-based, and uses a “green” extractant to remove the heavy REEs from the light REEs.

Advantage:
• Chemical separation of rare earth elements into high-value and low-value streams
• Simple and fast – one-step process does not require special process equipment
• Environmentally friendly – uses green extract in place of hazardous organophosphorous compounds
• Cost effective

Application:
Rare earth ore processing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209844327Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth ore processingPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProcedure for concentrating rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets for efficient recyclinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20983Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process combining simple and environmentally-friendly chemical reactions with mechanical steps to enrich rare earth elements from neodymium iron boride magnet scrap for improved recycling.

Description:
Neodymium iron boride magnets are used in a variety of applications which require high energy density, most notably in clean energy solutions (generators and traction motors).  A variety of methods are available for recycling spent magnets, including pyrometallurgy and liquid extraction using organophospates.  While effective, these methods can have high energy costs and utilize extremely hazardous chemicals, making NdFeB recycling less attractive.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

Advantage:
• Minimal capital investment required
• Environmentally friendly
• Effective for other rare-earth iron containing compounds

Application:
Rare earth magnet recycling

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209834293Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process which combines reducing the magnet into powder, oxidizing the powder, mechanical milling, and reducing and removing the iron.  The process can be implemented with minimal capital investment, making it applicable for smaller recyclers, and eliminates using acids and other hazardous chemicals to concentrate the rare earth elements.  The process may also be used directly on swarf from magnet machining, making recovery from this waste stream more cost effective.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth magnet recyclingStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSoil Nitrate System for Precision Management of Nitrogen Fertilizer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20755Description:
The soil nitrate sensing system allows nitrate to be analyzed rapidly in-real-time in the field. By measuring nitrate at multiple locations along with GPS coordinates for each location, the system can be used to rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations, which can be used as the basis for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications. Alternatively the sensor can be attached to (integrated with) a fertilizer applicator, allowing real time modulation of nitrogen fertilizer application rates based on measured soil nitrate levels. The soil nitrate sensing technology will make the Late Spring Nitrate Test (LSNT) practical and cost effective for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications.

Advantage:
• Real-time, on-the-go soil nitrate concentration sensing technology that can be attached to farm implements
• Measures soil nitrate concentrations in the parts per million range within ~1 second, so GPS registered data stream can be acquired
• Depth averaging (0 to 12 inches) to meet LSNT protocol
• System can rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations
• Makes precision sidedress nitrogen fertilizer applications possible – improving nitrogen use efficiency in crop production, saving farmers money, and reducing impact on the environment

Application:
Precision agriculture

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207554383Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:03 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLubricated Mechanical Nanopolishing and Motor Oil for Self-Healing Metals and Ceramicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20754Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to produce extremely flat and smooth surfaces on hard materials without involving a chemical etchant.

Description:
Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a process used to create defect-free, smooth and flat surfaces, primarily for the semiconductor industry, and involves both mechanical polishing and chemical etching. CMP slurries (which provide the physical interface between the sample and the polishing equipment) typically consist of an abrasive (most often a metal oxide such as silica, ceria, alumina or zirconia), a liquid medium (normally water, but can be others depending on the application), and chemical agents (oxidizers, bases, acids) which treat the surface.
By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

Advantage:
• A 2 to 3 fold increase in surface smoothness
• Applicable to many hard surfaces
• May be extended to internal combustion engine lubricants
• May increase energy efficiency in treated engines

Application:
Semiconductor manufacture and internal combustion engine lubricants

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207544333Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:02 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acidhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20752Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:41 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207524402Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForGroup:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediaminehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20750Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207504357Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:]]>Group:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20749Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207494289Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:45 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRapid Room-temperature Polymerization of Bio-based Multiaziridine-containing Compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19739Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a catalyst-free, room-temperature synthesis route to create a thermosetting polymer from biorenewable materials.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers have demonstrated the production of thermoset from biorenewable sources.  Beginning with acrylated, epoxidized soybean oil, the process involves reaction with aziridine followed by cross-linking using succinic, citric and other biobased diacids.  While the resultant properties were dependent upon the diacid used and the degree of acrylation of the soybean oil, all of the polymers had an amorphous structure.

Advantage:
• Thermosetting polymer made from predominantly biorenewable materials.
• Room temperature reaction with high conversion rate minimizes operating expenses.

Application:
Thermoset polymer with high renewable content

References:
1: “Rapid room-temperature polymerization of bio-based multiaziridine-containing compounds”, R. Chen et al., 2015, RSC Advances. 5:1557-1563.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 07:46:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197394279Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Rapid room-temperature polymerization of bio-based multiaziridine-containing compounds”, R. Chen et al., 2015, RSC Advances. 5:1557-1563.

]]>Patent:

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTechnology for Compact , Environmentally Friendly Air Conditioners and Heat Pumpshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19488Description:
Currently available heat and mass exchangers, key components in absorption heat pumps, are large and expensive to build. In spite of their favorability as environmentally friendly alternatives to CFC based air conditioners, their size and expense make them viable only for very large scale operations. This invention is a new design for heat and mass exchangers which are compact, modular, versatile, easy to design and fabricate, and can be constructed using existing heat transfer technology and extremely simple heat transfer surfaces. These heat and mass exchangers could be uniformly used for almost all components in an absorption heat pump, including absorbers, desorbers, condensers, evaporators and rectifiers.

Advantage:
• Use of these heat and mass exchangers in the large residential and low-tonnage markets would lead to less ozone depletion and global warming because absorption heat pumps do not rely on CFCs as thermal exchange fluids. The fluids they use are commercially available and inexpensive, as are the basic surfaces for constructing the exchangers. The technology will have lower capital and operational costs than competing technologies. In addition to use in private home and industrial air conditioning, the technology could be used by any industry that relies on thermal systems, such as manufacturing, chemical processing, and power generation industries. Competing products include: CFC based air conditioners for home use, traditional large scale heat and mass exchangers.

Application:
1. Space conditioning equipment manufacturers. 2. Chemical processing and power generation equipment manufacturers.

References:
1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

Stage0.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 19 May 2015 12:04:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194882500Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:32 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Garimella, S. et al. 2011. Microchannel component technology for system-wide application in ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. Intl. J. Refrig. 34:1184–1196.

2: Determan, M. and S. Graimella. 2011. Ammonia–water desorption heat and mass transfer in microchannel devices. Intl. J. Refrig. 34: 1197–1208.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersContinuationUnited States6,802,36409/669,0569/25/200010/12/200410/12/20165/19/201511/13/2017Method and Means for Miniaturization of Binary-Fluid Heat and Mass ExchangersCIPUnited States7,066,24110/894,3257/19/20046/27/20067/19/20195/19/201511/13/2017FalseCost Effective Production of Giant Magneto-Caloric Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19450Summary:
Researchers at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory have developed a cost effective method for producing giant magnetocaloric material Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

Description:
Magnetic refrigeration has promise as an alternative to compressor technology for applications that range from liquefaction of helium to room temperature air conditioning. However, for most magnetic refrigeration applications large amounts (several hundred grams to hundreds of kilograms) of the magnetocaloric materials are needed to obtain sufficient cooling.  Unfortunately, processes for making giant magnetocaloric materials materials has been difficult to scale efficiently and still produce homogenous ingots.  To overcome this limitation, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for utilizing commercially available Gadolinium feedstock for cost effective production of material with improved magneto-caloric properties.  As a consequence, this method may enhance the commercial utility of of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and highly efficient.

Advantage:
• This new method allows for cost effective production of Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).
• The lower cost will dramatically improve the commercial viability of magnetic refrigeration technologies which are environmentally friendly and efficient.
• No commercial method is currently available to use commercial Gd metal to produce Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.

Application:
Applications exist anywhere there is need for freezing, heating, or cooling. Industries which produce cryogenics systems; supermagnets; and HVAC systems for homes, vehicular transports and other applications will be interested in this technology.

References:
V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples of the material have been produced.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 15 May 2015 15:10:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194502487Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:28 GMTSummary:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, useful for various types of refrigeration applications, from liquifaction of helium (4K) to room temperature air conditioning and climate control.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 samples of 1 kilogram or more, which have improved magnetocaloric properties over material produced by other methods. (The magnetocaloric effect is approximately 25% better than the first reported values (Physical Review Letters, June 1997) for the Gd5(Si2Ge2) which was prepared in 10-20g quantities by arc melting using high purity Ames Laboratory Gd metal).]]>Gd5(Si2Ge2) in large quantities and with high magnetocaloric effect.]]>Application:

]]>References:V. K. Pecharsky and K. A. Gschneidner, Jr., “Giant Magnetocaloric Effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2)”, Physical Review Letters, 78, pp. 4494 - 4497, 1997

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method of Making Active Magnetic Refrigerant Materials Based on Gd-Si-Ge AlloysCIPUnited States7,114,34010/413,4174/14/200310/3/200610/9/20215/15/201511/13/2017FalseNovel Method for Conversion of Cellulose to High-Value Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19436Summary:
Iowa State University researchers and their colleagues at the Iowa Energy Center have developed an improved method for converting cellulose and related materials to high-value products such as ethylene glycol and propylene glycol.

Description:
Petroleum has long been the starting point for the production of many high-value chemicals such as ethylene glycol, but diminishing petroleum supplies and environmental concerns are driving research into ways to use renewable sources for making these types of compounds.  Biomass is abundant and renewable, but methods to hydrolyze cellulose and related carbohydrate materials for production of small molecules often require the use of harsh or expensive reagents such as strong acids or enzymes since cellulose is usually not soluble in conventional solvents and is also refractory to chemical or biological treatments.  Conventional acid hydrolysis methods have also suffered from the high cost of building corrosion resistant plants, acid recovery, and generation of chemical wastes.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers and their collaborators at the Iowa Energy Center have developed a novel method for the conversion of cellulose and related carbohydrate materials to high-value materials.  This method, which involves heating under pressure a mixture of cellulose and low-molecular-weight alcohol, does not require pretreatment of the starting material and can be used to produce ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and other low molecular weight materials without the use of expensive reagents, metal catalysts, hydrogen gas or enzymes.  In addition, this method produces alkyl glucosides and levoglucosan that can be converted into glucose for subsequent production of ethanol and other products.

Advantage:
• Effective (conversion of biomaterials to alcohol-soluble products is high)
• Simple (avoids the use of metal catalysts, hydrogen gas or enzymes)
• Environmentally friendly (does not produce toxic wastes)
• Robust (relatively insensitive to the presence of impurities)

Application:
Biobased production of high-value chemicals

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Efficient conversion of cellulose to high-value chemicals such as ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, glucosides, and levoglucosan has been demonstrated under laboratory conditions, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194363650Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:22 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Method for the Conversion of Cellulose and Related Carbohydrate Materials to Low-Molecular-Weight CompoundsUtilityUnited States8,383,86412/962,77012/8/20102/26/20137/6/20315/14/201511/13/2017Method for the Conversion of Cellulose and Related Carbohydrate Materials to Low-Molecular-Weight CompoundsCIPUnited States8,686,19213/593,7558/24/20124/1/201412/8/20305/14/201511/13/2017FalseConvenient Synthesis of A-Type Procyanidinshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19431Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved method for synthesis of A-type procyanidins, compounds found in cinnamon, which may be useful in the treatment of diabetes and other diseases.

Description:
The rise of Type 2 diabetes is a serious public health concern and the role of diet and lifestyle in its development have been the subject of intense research.  Plant-based foods, including many common spices, are thought to be important for the control and possibly prevention of Type 2 diabetes.  In fact, common spices such as cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and bay leaves have been shown to have insulin-potentiating activity in vitro, with type A procyandidins being identified with having insulin promoting activity.  Unfortunately, type-A procyanidins are difficult to synthesize, making investigation into their possible role in the treatment and/or prevention of Type 2 diabetes more demanding.  To overcome this obstacle, ISU researchers have developed a convenient one-step synthesis method for type-A procyanidins that does not require the complex starting materials or suffer from low yields of other known synthesis methods.  Since this method can be scaled to produce gram quantities of material, it may represent a starting point for the development of type A procyanidin-based drug leads for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and possibly other diseases.

Advantage:
• Simple (synthesis requires only one step)
• Efficient (yields of 76-80% have been demonstrated)

Application:
Nutraceutical production

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The synthesis route has been described, materials are available for testing, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194313313Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:17 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Nutraceutical productionStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsUtilityUnited States7,615,64911/275,7561/26/200611/10/20098/8/20275/14/201511/13/2017Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsContinuationUnited States8,138,35812/563,9099/21/20093/20/20128/23/20235/14/201511/13/2017Synthesis of Polycyclic ProcyanidinsDivisionalUnited States8,415,48913/292,81211/9/20114/9/20131/26/20265/14/201511/13/2017FalseAluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25372Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength, lightweight aluminum wire for high-voltage power transmission with reduced electrical resistance for overhead electrical lines.

Description:
High-voltage electric power transmission cables based on pure aluminum strands with a stranded steel core (ACSR) or stranded aluminum alloy (ACAR) core have the disadvantages of mediocre tensile strength, high density, and poor strength and conductivity retention at elevated temperatures. This combination of properties causes excessive sag in overload situations and limits the mechanical tension the cables can bear in icing and high wind situations. Alternative materials that increase cable strength generally have poor conductivity and/or high cost. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have discovered a method to produce an aluminum matrix wire composite with reduced density that adds strength while retaining maximum ampacity.

Advantage:
• Simple (manufacturing methods are similar to those used now)
• Effective (high electrical conductivity and strength at both ambient and high temperatures)
• Economical (use of low cost materials)

Application:
High-voltage wires and cables for electrical transmission

References:
1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
The Al/Ca composite has demonstrated promising corrosion resistance and elevated temperature performance properties while creep and fatigue strengths are being investigated.

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 14:03:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253723794Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Aluminum/Alkaline Earth Metal Composites and Method for ProducingUtilityUnited States8,647,53613/136,5998/4/20112/11/201411/28/20315/24/201711/13/2017FalseMaterial to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganisms and Microalgaehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19422Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that provides an economical and efficient process to harvest microorganisms such as microalgae from growth media.

Description:
The interest in using algae as feedstock for biofuel production has steadily increased in recent years. In addition to biofuel applications, algae also provide valuable materials for the nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and food industries. However, methods to obtain concentrated volumes of algae from growth media are expensive, energy intensive and inefficient.  To overcome these drawbacks, researchers at Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory have developed a material for easy separation of microorganisms from the media; the material and growth medium may also be reused after the microorganisms have been recovered. The material provides benefits and advantages over other currently known methods concentrating microalgae and other microorganisms by avoiding the addition of soluble chemicals which have the potential to interfere with sequestration, the high energy demand of filtration methods, and inefficient recovery through the loss of flocculation compounds.

Advantage:
• High yields of microorganisms/microalgae
• Re-use of material for continuous microorganism harvest
• Simple and fast microorganism removal
• No impact on growth media

Application:
Sequestration of microorganisms from growth media for use in biofuel production, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and the food industry

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194223784Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Samples are available for testing.Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Magnetic Mesoporous Material for the Sequestration of AlgaeUtilityUnited States8,828,70513/300,34311/18/20119/9/20142/5/20325/14/201511/13/2017FalseProcess for Fabrication of Efficient Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19420Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for fabrication of solar cells with increased efficiency.

Description:
Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight.  However, the efficiency of organic solar cells is about 4-6%, and increasing this efficiency is critical for developing practical applications and commercially viable devices.  One approach to increasing efficiency is to increase the light absorption on the organic film without increasing the thickness of the photoactive layer, and various light management techniques have been tried for enhancing optical absorption, such as collection mirrors, patterned substrates and microprism substrates.  However, these approaches require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for conformal coating of polymer photovoltaic layers on microtextured substrates for increased light trapping.  The light management architecture of these solar cells enables a high degree of light absorption in even very thin photoactive films and leads to improved power conversion efficiency.

Advantage:
• Efficient (improves light absorption and power conversion)
• Economical (can be fabricated using low-cost and scalable soft lithography techniques)

Application:
Photovoltaics

References:
1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A 20% increase in efficiency has been observed experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194203677Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Textured Micrometer Scale Templates as Light Managing Fabrication Platform for Organic Solar CellsUtilityUnited States9,401,44213/223,3519/1/20117/26/201610/17/20338/15/201611/13/2017FalseInnovative Sulfide Removal Technology for Wastewater Treatmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19419Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for removing sulfide compounds from wastewater and reducing their concentrations to as low as 1 ppmv without disturbing methanogenesis.

Description:
Sulfur compounds present in industrial wastewater have the potential to be converted into highly corrosive and malodorous hydrogen sulfide, which not only can be detrimental to the performance of metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes, but also reduces the quality of methane obtained as a renewable energy source from wastewater treatment in bioreactors. Current approaches to these problems use the addition of chemicals to treat sulfur compounds, adding costs and creating the need for subsequent disposal.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an economical method for removal of sulfide compounds from wastewater which does not generate additional compounds with no economic value, and which also does not disturb methanogesis in bioreactors.  This process has shown to successfully reduce sulfur compounds to concentrations as low as 1 ppmv with minimal sulfate production in wastewater with a high solids content.

Advantage:
• Effective for higher concentrations of sulfide compounds
• Maximum elemental sulfur recovery
• No impact on methanogenesis
• Reduced need for chemical additives

Application:
Wastewater treatment

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Shown to reduce sulfur compounds to concentrations as low as 1 ppmv

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194193205Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Shown to reduce sulfur compounds to concentrations as low as 1 ppmv

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Micro-Aeration of Sulfide Removal from BiogasUtilityUnited States8,366,93212/564,5819/22/20092/5/20131/24/20315/14/201511/13/2017FalsePiezoelectric-Based Vibration Energy Harvesterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19689Summary:
The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.


Description:
A potential means of extending battery life is the use of miniature renewable self-contained power supply units, which can convert ambient vibrations from existing sources in their environment into electrical form, and use this harvested energy to supplement batteries and/or other energy storage elements.  This invention employs a unique nonlinear, self-tuning, bistable vibration energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from broadband and varying-amplitude sources, combined with synchronized energy extraction circuits using electronic breaker switches for efficient harvesting.

Advantage:
• Extends battery life by effectively converting ambient vibrations into electrical energy
• Combines nonlinear bistable transduction with synchronized extraction
• Piezoelectric harvester with a simple micro-engineered design allowing a variety of material choices for ease of implementation
• ~100X increased harvested power, especially for broadband variations, compared to other harvesters using the same input, due to bistable transduction and synchronized extraction
• Presents a completely mechanical, zero-energy-cost method to increase range of excitation amplitudes over which the system remains bistable, further doubling the efficiency over varying amplitude excitations
• Presents for the first time an accurate mathematical model for a bistable transducer by augmenting the Butterworth van Dyke piezoelectric model to capture external magnetic forces

Application:
Remote sensors that can harvest ambient mechanical vibrations/energy to extend their battery life.

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196894354Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:52 GMTSummary:The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseEfficient Polymer Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19212Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for producing more efficient polymer solar cells by increasing light absorption through a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer deposited on a textured substrate.

Description:
So-called first generation photovoltaic or solar cells are based on the use of crystalline silicon wafers.  While improvements in efficiency have been made with these types of solar cells, their high cost has driven research into materials that would be cheaper to use.  Second generation photovoltaic technologies with the potential to be more economical to manufacture include thin-film, organic (polymer or oligomer), and hybrid organic-inorganic cells.  Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have a number of advantages, including manufacturability (roll-to-roll processes on flexible substrates are possible), low-temperature processing, high optical absorption coefficients, and tunability. Unfortunately, OPVs suffer from low power conversion efficiencies, with 7% being among the highest documented experimentally.  To address this problem, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed for a process to produce a thin and uniform light-absorbing layer on textured substrates that improves the efficiency of polymer solar cells by increasing light trapping.  While the use of textured substrates is commonly used in conventional, silicon-based solar cells, attempts to use textured substrates in polymer solar cells have not been successful because they require expensive extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies that can result in a light-absorbing layer with air gaps or sub-optimal coating thickness in the valleys or on the ridges of the substrate pattern; these solar cells can have poor performance due to a loss of charges and short circuiting at the valleys and ridges.  The technology developed by the ISU team overcomes these drawbacks by optimizing the dimensions of the underlying topographical features, enabling a conformal photovoltaic active layer to be coated on the textured substrate.  As consequence, light trapping is enhanced, resulting in more efficient power conversion compared to flat solar cells. Light captured at the red/near infrared band edge is also increased compared to flat solar cells.

Advantage:
• Efficient (light trapping is more effective compared to flat solar cells without compromising electrical characteristics)
• Economical (does not require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies)

Application:
Solar cell manufacturing

References:
1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
An increase in power conversion efficiency of 20 percent compared to flat solar cells made from polymers, as well as an increase in light captured at the red/near infrared band edge of 100 percent over flat cells has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192123847Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “On realizing higher efficiency polymer solar cells using a textured substrate platform”, Kanwar S. Nalwa, Joong-Mok Park, Kai-Ming Ho, and Sumit Chaudhary. 2010. Adv. Mat.

2: "Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells", Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary. 2010. Optics Express 8: 5168-6178.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseEnhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19211Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a soft lithography microlens fabrication and array that enables more efficient organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), improving their commercial viability.

Description:
OLEDs have received considerable attention for applications such as lighting and displays because they consume less energy than other technologies such as liquid crystal displays; in addition, they produce higher quality images since the pixels in an OLED generate their own light which can be turned off to make a pixel truly black and create a high contrast ratio.  However, OLEDs have not gained much commercial traction for lighting applications because they are expensive to manufacture and because there are intrinsic lighting inefficiencies due the OLED structure causing emitted light to be internally reflected or lost through edge emission.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a microlens array design and fabrication method that creates a new (micro)luminaire that is structurally integrated with the OLED pixel. The microlens array is produced using low cost soft lithography techniques on the substrate of OLEDs and enhances light extraction.  In addition, it is suitable for all colors, including white, and can be used for any configuration, pixel size, or pixel shape.  Since this microlens array makes OLEDs more efficient and since it can be manufactured using an economically viable method, it also makes commercial applications for OLEDs more practical.

Advantage:
• Economical (production does not require a clean room and uses low cost microtransfer molding technique)
• Efficient (100% enhancement of light extraction has been demonstrated experimentally)
• Versatile (can be used for all colors and any pixel size or shape as well as any configuration)

Application:
Lighting and displays

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A 100% enhancement of the electroluminescence (EL) output compared to OLEDs with conventional structure has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:11 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192113831Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:20 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Soft Lithography Microlens Fabrication and Array for Enhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)UtilityUnited States8,742,40613/397,7492/16/20126/3/20146/5/20185/5/201511/13/2017FalseBandwidth Recycling for More Efficient Data Transmissionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19267Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed scheduling algorithms to employ unused bandwidth to improve broadband network efficiency.

Description:
The explosion in the use of the Internet and the need to transfer multimedia data has lead to increasing requirements being placed on communications networks.  Bandwidth, which can be a limited and valuable resource, must be managed efficiently to provide high quality services to users (QoS).  A variety of approaches have been used to meet the demands for QoS while simultaneously providing diversified traffic services, including reservation protocols, traffic shaping, scheduling algorithms, and congestion avoidance.  However, most of these approaches require predicting the amount of incoming traffic, which is difficult to do since video streaming, VoIP, etc. generate data at variable rates. To provide a high QoS, subscriber stations are required to request the needed bandwidth from base stations prior to any transmission of data; subscriber stations often keep reserved bandwidth—even when it is more than the data transmitted—and thus some bandwidth may be wasted.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a network protocol to employ unused bandwidth to improve network efficiency through bandwidth recycling.  This approach utilizes scheduling algorithms to increase the probability of successful recycling.  Since bandwidth recycling does not change the existing bandwidth reservation, it maintains the QoS guarantee and does not introduce any extra delay in data transmission.  In addition, simulation results have demonstrated the potential for bandwidth recycling to improve network throughput by 40%. This technology has utility for any 4G broadband wireless network.

Advantage:
• Accurate (obviates the need for traffic prediction)
• Efficient (wasted bandwidth can be utilized immediately to improve network throughput)
• Economical (bandwidth recycling introduces limited overhead)
• Versatile (enhances QoS for both WiMax and LTE networks)

Application:
Communications networks

References:
1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Simulation results demonstrate that bandwidth recycling can improve network throughput by 40% and decrease data latency, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 14:16:30 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192673804Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Bandwidth Recycling in IEEE 802.16 Networks”, David Chuck and J. Morris Chang, 2010, IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9: 1451-1464.]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Bandwidth Recycling in NetworksUtilityUnited States8,737,42913/084,7044/12/20115/27/201411/1/20325/7/201511/13/2017FalseDepolymerization of Polylactic Acidhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19197Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple and efficient process for depolymerization of polylactic acid based plastic, and the resulting lactic acid provides a renewed feedstock for new biobased plastics.

Description:
The continuous growth of polymers made from biorenewable materials to reduce dependency on petroleum feedstocks has also generated demand for a "cradle to cradle" process for efficient and economical recycling of bio-based plastics.  Polylactic acid (PLA) products are made from corn starch and/or sugar cane, and are potentially biodegradable under controlled conditions. However, reclaiming virgin monomers from postconsumer plastics to generate renewed plastic material is preferred over biodegradation because of issues related to proper environmental controls for landfills and composting.  Unfortunately, current methods to depolymerize PLA are energy intensive and/or inefficient, making them unattractive for recycling. To overcome these drawbacks, Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple method for postconsumer PLA-based plastic to be recycled in an efficient and economical process. This method—which uses simple compounds and moderate energy at a fast reaction speed—results in depolymerization of PLA at very high rates. As a consequence the process/cycle time for recovery of the monomer is reduced and cost effective recycling of PLA is enabled.

Advantage:
• Efficient (depolymerization occurs at high rates)
• Economical (requires reduced process/cycle time)
• Simple (reaction conditions and chemical inputs are moderate)

Application:
Recycling of polylactic acid based plastic

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Efficient, rapid depolymerization of polylactic acid under moderate conditions has been demonstrated on a laboratory scale.

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191973950Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Depolymerization of Polylactic AcidUtilityUnited States8,895,77813/357,4421/24/201211/25/20146/10/20325/7/201511/13/2017FalseWet Spinning Process of Lignin for Fiber Productionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19195Summary:
The technology enables an economical production of carbon fibers from biorenewable feedstock based on lignin, an abundant byproduct of paper manufacturing and cellulosic derived fuel.

Description:
Due to its complex interconnected structure, lignin is a very brittle biopolymer that cannot be spun, stretched or aligned, and spooled into fibers without modification. However, the potential use of lignin fibers as an economical, biorenewable carbon fiber precursor has made it an attractive compound for investigation.

Iowa State University researchers have devised a method to improve the processability of the lignin-based prescursor so that small diameter lignin fiber can be produced, spun, and stretched prior to pyrolysis into carbon fiber. In the proposed method a commonly available solvent plasticizes the lignin to a degree that allows spinning the resulting fiber into a coagulation bath which easily removes the solvent. Since no thermal or oxidative degradation has occurred during processing, the resulting fibers contain a very high concentration of lignin and are therefore relatively consistent in properties.

Advantage:
• Economical (feedstock is based on low cost, abundant by-product)
• Environmental (uses biorenewable feedstock)
• Simple (use of common fiber spinning technology)

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to bring this technology to market

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191953959Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Iowa State University researchers have devised a method to improve the processability of the lignin-based prescursor so that small diameter lignin fiber can be produced, spun, and stretched prior to pyrolysis into carbon fiber. In the proposed method a commonly available solvent plasticizes the lignin to a degree that allows spinning the resulting fiber into a coagulation bath which easily removes the solvent. Since no thermal or oxidative degradation has occurred during processing, the resulting fibers contain a very high concentration of lignin and are therefore relatively consistent in properties.

]]>Advantage:Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseCatalyst for Selective Acid Transesterficationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19192Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory are looking for industry partners to commercialize a newly developed bi-functional, heterogeneous catalyst that is designed to expel aqueous byproducts formed during transesterfications reactions.

Description:
The ability to separate functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for recycling has enabled applications of these materials as heterogeneous catalysts in many chemical transformations. However, their sensitivity to hydrolysis and subsequent loss of catalytic performance has reduced the economic benefit potential of MSN catalysts. To address this drawback, Iowa  State  University  and  Ames  Laboratory  researchers  have  developed  an  efficient bifunctional MSN catalyst for esterification reactions. Superior reactivity has been achieved using this catalyst by supplementing the catalytic groups with secondary functionality designed to expel the resulting aqueous by-products, thereby preventing hydrolysis of the silica surface and plugging of the nano-environment. The principle employed in the architecture of this new catalyst makes it suitable for reactions involving dehydration and yields compounds of high purity.

Advantage:
• Robust structure enables multiple recycling
• High purity yields are achieved by efficiently expelling by-products of reaction
• Enhanced reactivity compared to existing commercial catalysts

Application:
acid transesterfication, dehydration reaction

Stage0.png
Development Stage:


Lab trials have been successful

Desc3881.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191923881Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:acid transesterfication, dehydration reactionStage0.png

]]>Lab trials have been successfulDesc3881.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica CatalystUtilityUnited States8,993,79313/361,6131/30/20123/31/20153/10/20335/7/201511/13/2017FalseDiisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sourceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19131Summary:
Polyurethane materials completely based on bio-renewable resources have been successfully developed at Iowa State University.

Description:
Polyurethanes are an important class of polymers with uses in a wide variety of materials. The raw materials for production of polyurethanes are polyols and diisocyantes, which are typically derived from petroleum-based feedstocks. While production of polyols from biorenewable sources such as vegetable oils has been successfully developed and implemented in commercially available products, production of diisocyantes from renewable sources has not received as much attention and advancement. In order to provide polyurethane polymers completely based on renewable resources, Iowa State University researchers have successfully enabled a synthesis route for diisocyanates based on “green technology”. This simple and inexpensive method to produce bio-based diisocyanates with required performance characteristics for various polyurethane polymers for use in foams, coatings, elastomers, and other applications is easily adaptable and does not require expensive or exotic catalyst systems.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives and Cross-Linked Resins and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

Advantage:
• Offers complete polyurethane systems based on renewable components
• Simple synthesis route
• Economical method with low energy needs

Application:
Production of Polyurethanes from Renewable Sources

References:
1: Zenner, M. et al. 2013. Polyurethanes from isosorbide-based diisocyanates. Chem. Sus. Chem 6: 1182-1185.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Diisocyanates from succinic anhydride and isosorbide or isomannide have been prepared, and representative polyurethanes that are produced from these diisocyanates have excellent thermal stability and stereochemistry-dependent morphology.  Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to test and commercialize the technology.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191314032Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:58 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Group:ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives and Cross-Linked Resins and ISURF 4346: Tackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbide

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Zenner, M. et al. 2013. Polyurethanes from isosorbide-based diisocyanates. Chem. Sus. Chem 6: 1182-1185.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDiisocyanates from succinic anhydride and isosorbide or isomannide have been prepared, and representative polyurethanes that are produced from these diisocyanates have excellent thermal stability and stereochemistry-dependent morphology.  Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to test and commercialize the technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Polyisocyanates from Fused Bicyclic Polyols and Polyurethanes TherefromUtilityUnited States9,556,29314/434,7104/9/20151/31/20174/30/20351/31/201711/13/2017FalseSorbent Assisted Catalyst for the One-Pot Sequestration and Conversion of Renewable Feedstocks into Fuelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19129Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a technology that provides a simplified and economical production of hydrocarbon fuel from renewable resources with higher energy potential compared to ethanol or biodiesel. The ability to achieve higher yields from lipid feedstock, and in particular algae oils, by not utilizing current methods of fatty acid conversion to methyl esters, makes this technology economically attractive. Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to commercialize this technology.

Description:
Conversion of fatty acids to biodiesel has enabled energy properties comparable to conventional fuel sources derived from petroleum products.  However, the use of strong alkali catalysts and elimination of the glycerol waste component from the lipid conversion process reduces the yields obtained from the renewable feedstock. Separation of lipids from various sources such as algae has also presented a significant obstacle to the commercial viability of biorenewable fuels.  In order to achieve the conversion yield of complex, lipid feedstock mixtures comparable to conventional hydrocarbon fuels, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a catalyst system that enables selective adsorption and catalytic conversion of the targeted lipids into hydrocarbons.  The catalyst design enables the production of gasoline or diesel fuels that is chemically equivalent to that derived from petrochemicals without generating a glycerol byproduct.

Advantage:
• Complete conversion of lipids into hydrocarbon fuel
• Economical process
• Catalyst can be recycled

Application:
Fuel Production from Biorenewable Lipid Feedstocks

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Treatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191294075Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngTreatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Adsorbent Catalytic Nanoparticles and Methods of Using the SameUtilityUnited States9,556,08813/691,18111/30/20121/31/20178/3/20351/31/201711/13/2017Catalysts and Methods of Using the SameCIPUnited States9,567,26514/015,2068/30/20132/14/20172/4/20342/16/201711/13/2017FalseTubular Shell Wind Turbine Tower Constructed of UHPC for Taller Turbineshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19105

Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have enable construction of taller towers for wind turbines for better wind capture and increased power generation.

Description:
Wind energy is an area of increasing interest for power generation.  Wind turbines, which generate electrical power, are mounted on towers; the specific energy yield increases with the height of the tower due to higher winds above ground level.  However, as tower heights increase, so do transportation, construction and assembly costs; towers made of steel that are over 100 m in height—capable of producing multi-megawatts of electricity—require a diameter at the tower base of over 5 meters to support the towerhead weights of hundreds of tons, which prohibits their transportation by road.  High wind turbine towers made of steel may also be vulnerable to buckling or other damage due loads from winds, snow, seismic activity, etc.  To address the demands to balance wind turbine construction and transportation costs with efficiency and accessibility, ISU researchers have designed and tested construction of wind turbine towers using ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC).  These towers may enable erection of wind turbines at heights of 100 meters, about 20 meters higher than today’s wind turbines.  As a consequence, the steadier and less turbulent winds at that height could be harnessed to provide increased power production.  These UHPC towers are assembled from hexagonal shaped segments that can be easily shipped over road and built on site.

Advantage:
• Increased tower life through use of ultra-high performance and high-strength concrete
• Enables increased tower height
• Components are small enough to permit transportation by standard trucking
• Can be assembled on site
• Towers can be customized for any turbine size

Application:
Wind energy

Development Stage:
Tower segments have been tested and found to withstand 36% beyond extreme load for a 100 meter high tower, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Stage0.png

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]]>Sun, 03 May 2015 15:15:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191053732Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:46 GMTSummary: ]]>Iowa State University researchers have enable construction of taller towers for wind turbines for better wind capture and increased power generation.

]]>Description: ]]>Wind energy is an area of increasing interest for power generation.  Wind turbines, which generate electrical power, are mounted on towers; the specific energy yield increases with the height of the tower due to higher winds above ground level.  However, as tower heights increase, so do transportation, construction and assembly costs; towers made of steel that are over 100 m in height—capable of producing multi-megawatts of electricity—require a diameter at the tower base of over 5 meters to support the towerhead weights of hundreds of tons, which prohibits their transportation by road.  High wind turbine towers made of steel may also be vulnerable to buckling or other damage due loads from winds, snow, seismic activity, etc.  To address the demands to balance wind turbine construction and transportation costs with efficiency and accessibility, ISU researchers have designed and tested construction of wind turbine towers using ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC).  These towers may enable erection of wind turbines at heights of 100 meters, about 20 meters higher than today’s wind turbines.  As a consequence, the steadier and less turbulent winds at that height could be harnessed to provide increased power production.  These UHPC towers are assembled from hexagonal shaped segments that can be easily shipped over road and built on site.

]]>Advantage: ]]>Increased tower life through use of ultra-high performance and high-strength concrete ]]>Enables increased tower height ]]>Components are small enough to permit transportation by standard trucking ]]>Can be assembled on site ]]>Towers can be customized for any turbine size]]>Application: ]]>Wind energy

]]>Development Stage:]]>Tower segments have been tested and found to withstand 36% beyond extreme load for a 100 meter high tower, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Wind Turbine Tower SystemUtilityUnited States9,016,01213/478,4975/23/20124/28/201510/6/20325/8/201511/13/2017Wind Turbine Tower SystemCIPUnited States8,881,48514/276,6335/13/201411/11/20145/23/20325/3/201511/20/2017FalseBiorenewable Biopolymers for Use as Carbon Fiber Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19667Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

Description:
As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

Advantage:
• Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)
• Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)

Application:
Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

References:
Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
The feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196674056Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:43 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers have developed a method for improved processing of lignin to enable extraction of small diameter fibers that are suitable for converting into carbon fibers.

]]>Description:As a result of their stiffness and strength, fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are an important class of materials for advanced structural applications, such as the blades on wind turbines.  The composites used for wind turbine blades currently primarily have fiberglass as the reinforcing component in the thermoset polymer resins. However, despite having advantages of low cost, adequate strength and stiffness, and high failure strain, glass fibers tend to have high density and low fatigue ratios, which constrains the dimensions and limits the performance of wind turbine blades.  Carbon fibers—which have excellent mechanical properties, high fatigue ratios, and low densities—represent an attractive solution for increasing the load bearing capacity of wind turbine blades without increasing their overall weight.  However, the high cost of carbon fibers, which are made from polyacrylnitrile polymers, has restricted their use in wind energy applications.  To overcome this drawback, ISU researchers have developed a simple method for producing biorenewable fibers from lignin-polylactide (PLA) blends as precursors for carbon fibers.  This simple process involves spinning modified lignin-PLA blends into robust, fine lignin fibers.  Since both lignin and PLA are derived from natural materials, this approach offers a much more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method to produce fibers with desired surface characteristics and mechanical properties for sophisticated structural functions.

]]>Advantage:Economical (lignin is abundant and inexpensive compared to other carbon fiber sources)]]>Facile (fibers can be processed by simple techniques, further reducing costs)]]>Application:Production of Fibers for Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

]]>References:Thunga, M. and M. Kessler. 2013. Low Cost, Bio-Renewable Carbon Fibers from Lignin/PLA Blends and Graft Copolymers. Carbon Fiber R & D Workshop, Buffalo, NY.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngThe feasibility of the process for blending lignin and PLA to produce continuously spun carbon fibers has been demonstrated. The fibers have been characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Process of Making Carbon Fibers From Compositions Including Esterified Lignin and Poly (Lactic Acid)UtilityUnited States9,340,42514/048,53210/8/20135/17/20167/26/20345/24/201611/13/2017FalseImproved Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ Passivationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19666Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

Description:
Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

Advantage:
• Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.
• Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.

Application:
Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

References:
“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196663993Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:42 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

]]>Description:Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

]]>Advantage:Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.]]>Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.]]>Application:Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

]]>References:“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ PassivationUtilityUnited States9,650,30913/986,1934/10/20135/16/20177/13/20346/21/201711/13/2017FalseNovel Catalysts for Isomerization of Glucose to Fructosehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19680Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed novel catalysts from commercial organic bases that can be used for economical, rapid, and efficient conversion of glucose to fructose for the food and chemicals industries.

Description:
High fructose corn syrup, an important component of a variety of food products, is predominately produced through the enzymatic isomerization of glucose.  While the commercially used enzyme has high yield and selectivity, its turnover rate is very low.  Recent advancements in utilizing tin-impregnated zeolites as catalysts have shown potential for high yield, selectivity and catalytic rate, but have not demonstrated long term stability in hydrothermal reaction environments.  In order to address these issues, ISU researchers have developed a hydrothermally stable carbon-based catalyst that incorporates Brønsted base moieties that have been shown to have comparable performance to the Sn/Beta catalysts in terms of rate, yield and selectivity.  Moreover, these carbon-based catalysts have been successfully tethered to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, resulting in a hydrothermally-stable, heterogeneous catalyst for glucose isomerization reactions.

Advantage:
• Hydrothermally stable
• High yield and fast reaction times
• Cost effective compared to Tin-Beta and solid Brønsted base catalysts

Application:
Brønsted base catalysts for the conversion of glucose to high fructose corn syrup

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
The catalysts have been demonstrated to convert glucose to fructose with a yield of 31% under mild reaction conditions

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196804175Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Hydrothermally stable]]>• High yield and fast reaction times]]>• Cost effective compared to Tin-Beta and solid Brønsted base catalysts]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseProduction of Low-Cost Carbon Catalyst Materialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19679Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple, one-step method for producing carbon materials containing multiple, stable catalytic sites that has utility for the production of low-cost heterogeneous catalysts.

Description:
Homogeneous acid catalysts are commonly used for the production of industrially important chemicals.  However, despite their low material costs, homogeneous catalysts add cost to the process because of the expense associated with separation, recycling and treatment of the waste sulfuric acid. To address these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a low-cost method for the creation of compounds consisting of a carbon backbone with covalently-bonded acid or base groups that have utility as hydrothermally stable carbon catalyst materials.  For example, these materials could be used as strong acid heterogeneous catalysts for reactors operating under hydrothermal conditions, which is important for reactions involving biological feedstocks.  In addition, the technology enables incorporation of a wide variety of functional groups into carbon materials by simply changing the bifunctional reactant.  This technology may also have application in areas such as electrochemistry and electronics since the functional groups can coordinate metal cations, useful for synthesis of nano-composite materials with a range of metals and metal combinations or used as colloidal materials.

Advantage:
• Low cost and simple chemistry
• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions
• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios

Application:
Heterogeneous catalysts

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
This method has been used for the synthesis of nano-composite materials with ferro magnetic particles with very high (40%) metal loadings that can subsequently be dispersed into thin films.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196794178Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:33 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:• Low cost and simple chemistry]]>• Covalently-bonded functional groups are stable under hydrothermal conditions]]>• Both acid and base functionalities can be combined into catalyst at prescribed ratios]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied for]]>]]>

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSensor for In-Situ, Wireless Soil Sensinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19678Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel, self-calibrating sensor for moisture and nutrients in soil that has wireless transmission and reception capability, making it especially useful as a sensing node for applications that are distributed over a wide area.

Description:
The advent of technologies such as GPS has driven the development of precision agriculture, which enables farmers to avail inter- and intra-field variations to manage resources and inputs so that costs and environmental impacts are minimized and productivity is maximized.  To help facilitate the management of important agricultural resources, ISU researchers have developed a self-calibrating, reliable and energy efficient soil moisture and nutrient sensor which can be buried at approximately root depth and is capable of wireless transmission and reception.  This sensor, which is based on the principle of impedance spectroscopy, can take real-time measurements of soil moisture and nutrient concentrations and transmit at frequencies much less than cellular, resulting in a much larger range.  The sensor is particularly well-suited for deployment as a node in a network of sensors that are spread over a large area, such as an agriculture field or drainage basin.

Advantage:
• Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements
• Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability
• Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions

Application:
Precision Agriculture; Environmental Monitoring; Underground to Above Ground Communication

References:
1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Prototype on-board sensors have been tested for soil monitoring applications using soil containing saline water and shown to have utility for measuring both soil moisture and ionic concentrations.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196784183Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:32 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements]]>Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability]]>Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSolvent-free Mechanochemical Synthesis of Alane (AlH3) at Room Temperaturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19676Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the synthesis of alane with quantitative yields at ambient temperature and moderate hydrogen or ambient gas pressure while controlling side reactions

Description:
Alane exceeds the DOE performance criteria for hydrogen storage for transportation vehicles, but does not have a cost-efficient production route. Synthesis of alane by metathesis reactions in organic solvents is inefficient because of the need to remove solvents from the resultant alane solvates that inevitably leads to thermal decomposition of a substantial fraction of the formed alane.  Traditional mechanochemical synthetic routes require cryogenic processing to control side reactions leading to decomposition of more than 60% of the formed alane.  This new method allows for the use of a mechanochemical process at ambient temperatures and slightly elevated hydrogen or inert gas pressures to produce alane while still suppressing side reactions to produce alane in quantitative yields.  By eliminating the desolvation step inherent in the solvent-based route and the cryogenic environment of traditional mechanochemical synthesis, this novel synthesis route significantly increases yields and reduces the production costs for this compound.

Advantage:
• Control of side reactions without cryogenic processing
• No hazardous solvents or expensive separation and purification steps
• Fast reactions with nearly quantitative yields

Application:
Solid state hydrogen storage for fuel cell and other applications.

References:
1: “Dry mechanochemical synthesis of alane from LiH and AlCl3”, I.Z. Hlova et al., 2014, Faraday Discussions DOI: 10.1039/c3fd00161j.

2: “Solvent-free mechanochemical synthesis of alane, AlH3: effect of pressure on the reaction pathway”,” S. Gupta et al., 2014, Green Chemistry 16: 4378-4388.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196764196Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:30 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the synthesis of alane with quantitative yields at ambient temperature and moderate hydrogen or ambient gas pressure while controlling side reactions

]]>Description:Alane exceeds the DOE performance criteria for hydrogen storage for transportation vehicles, but does not have a cost-efficient production route. Synthesis of alane by metathesis reactions in organic solvents is inefficient because of the need to remove solvents from the resultant alane solvates that inevitably leads to thermal decomposition of a substantial fraction of the formed alane.  Traditional mechanochemical synthetic routes require cryogenic processing to control side reactions leading to decomposition of more than 60% of the formed alane.  This new method allows for the use of a mechanochemical process at ambient temperatures and slightly elevated hydrogen or inert gas pressures to produce alane while still suppressing side reactions to produce alane in quantitative yields.  By eliminating the desolvation step inherent in the solvent-based route and the cryogenic environment of traditional mechanochemical synthesis, this novel synthesis route significantly increases yields and reduces the production costs for this compound.

]]>Advantage:Control of side reactions without cryogenic processing]]>No hazardous solvents or expensive separation and purification steps]]>Fast reactions with nearly quantitative yields]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Dry mechanochemical synthesis of alane from LiH and AlCl3”, I.Z. Hlova et al., 2014, Faraday Discussions DOI: 10.1039/c3fd00161j.

2: “Solvent-free mechanochemical synthesis of alane, AlH3: effect of pressure on the reaction pathway”,” S. Gupta et al., 2014, Green Chemistry 16: 4378-4388.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740False