Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USTue, 18 Dec 2018 15:08:31 GMTTue, 18 Dec 2018 15:08:31 GMThttps://cyber.harvard.edu/rss/rss.htmlsupport@inteum.comCopyright 2018, Iowa State UniversityModified La-Fe-Si Alloys for Magnetocaloric Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/28298Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have modified the giant Magneto Caloric Effect alloy La-Fe-Si to create new alloys with greatly improved mechanical properties.

Description:
Materials with first-order magnetic phase transition (i.e., giant MCE materials) often suffer from high brittleness, making them unsuitable for applications with magnetic field and temperature cyclic variation.  This brittleness leads to decreasing efficiency of cooling (associated with diminishing maximum adiabatic temperature change in the material) and mechanical failure during cycling.  To address these material deficiencies, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new La-Fe-SI alloys in which the addition of a fourth element greatly improves the mechanical properties of the alloy for magneto caloric applications.

These new alloys have been demonstrated to have nearly constant maximum adiabatic temperature change from cycle to cycle, dramatically improved mechanical integrity in response to magnet field and temperature cyclic variation, and tunable Curie temperature from 170 K to near room temperature.  The new alloying elements are low cost at very low dosage.

Advantage:
• Improved mechanical integrity resulting in no cracking after repeated magnetic field cycling.
• Curie temperature tunable from 170 K to near room temperature.
• Nearly constant maximum adiabatic temperature change of 8.2 K; low thermal hysteresis.
• Material compatible with manufacturing in buttons, rods, spheres and plates

Application:
Magnetocaloric refrigeration

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Wed, 25 Jul 2018 12:46:06 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/282984692Wed, 25 Jul 2018 12:48:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

These new alloys have been demonstrated to have nearly constant maximum adiabatic temperature change from cycle to cycle, dramatically improved mechanical integrity in response to magnet field and temperature cyclic variation, and tunable Curie temperature from 170 K to near room temperature.  The new alloying elements are low cost at very low dosage.

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]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsFalseRoom Temperature Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 MRI Contrast Agenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21035Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to create gadolinium silicide nanoparticles which retain ferromagnetic properties at room temperature.

Description:
This innovative method creates Gd5Si4 nanoparticles that retain the ferromagnetic properties of the bulk material at room temperature. These nanoparticles may be useful as a MRI contrast agent or for other applications that would benefit from materials that highly respond to a magnetic field, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, MRI thermometry, and hyperthermic cancer treatment.

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

Advantage:
• Increased magnetic properties compared to existing MRI contrast agents

Application:
MRI contrast agent; transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperthermic cancer treatment

References:
1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:38:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210354379Fri, 15 Jun 2018 14:09:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The gadolinium-based ferromagnetic particles are produced using ball milling in an inert atmosphere. The resultant particles retain an order of magnitude greater magnetization compared to conventionally prepared gadolinium particles. Ordinary preparation methods destroy the ordered structure required for ferromagnetism, resulting in materials with the much weaker paramagnetic properties - ferromagnetic materials have a high susceptibility to magnetization when subjected to a magnetic field and retain that magnetization after the field is removed; paramagnetic materials respond to a magnetic field but do not retain any magnetization when removed from the field.

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]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Investigation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles of Gd5Si4”, R.L. Hadimani et al., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 51, 2504104, 2015.  DOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2015.2446774

2. H. A. El-Gendy, S. M. Harstad, V. Vijayaragavan, S. Gupta, V. K. Pecharsky, J. Zweit and R. L. Hadimani "Ferromagnetic Gd5Si4 Nanoparticles as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging" IEEE Magnetics Letters, 2017, 8, 1507504. DOI 10.1109/lmag.2017.2728503

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Imaging| Life Sciences| MaterialsRoom Temperature Ferromagnetic Gadolinium Silicide NanoparticlesUtilityUnited States9,907,86515/332,94010/24/20163/6/201810/24/20366/15/20187/23/2018FalseBioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediaminehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20750Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

Group:
This technology is related to
ISURF 4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors,
ISURF 4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid, and
ISURF 4439: Isomerization of Muconic Acid for the Production of Bio-based Terephthalic Acid

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207504357Mon, 21 May 2018 13:58:15 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:]]>Group:ISURF 4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors,
ISURF 4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid, and
ISURF 4439: Isomerization of Muconic Acid for the Production of Bio-based Terephthalic Acid

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20749Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to
ISURF 4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine,
ISURF 4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid, and
ISURF 4439: Isomerization of Muconic Acid for the Production of Bio-based Terephthalic Acid

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207494289Mon, 21 May 2018 13:58:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine,
ISURF 4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid, and
ISURF 4439: Isomerization of Muconic Acid for the Production of Bio-based Terephthalic Acid

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]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSynthesis of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite films via cation exchange of melt-processed films for photovoltaic applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/27656Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method of making perovskite thin films for an absorber layer in photovoltaic cells.

Description:
Perovskite solar cells have been an area of interest in emerging solar technologies since 2009. With certified power conversion efficiency (PCE) increasing from about 1% to its current state of 22.7% in 8 years, perovskite cells have become competitive with current silicon based solar cells’ PCE. However, whereas silicon based solar cells are a mature technology that haven't seen significant PCE increases in years, perovskites continue to show improvement.  Additionally perovskite cells offer the advantage of being flexible thin films (with less material being used, potentially saving costs), that are partially transparent. The transparent nature allows for tandem cells, potentially further boosting PCE. Current tandem cells are so prohibitively expensive that their use has been limited to niche applications such as the aviation industry (where the main cost driver is weight/cost of fuel). The low cost of perovskites offers the possibility of tandem cells that are competitive on a cost/watt basis with single crystal Si.

Typical processing techniques of organolead mixed halide perovskites require dissolution of the individual single halide species before deposition of thin films (most commonly by spin coating or film casting). The precipitated species have questionable homogeneity and require regulated VOCs. These “air toxic” solvents have been a limiting factor for scale-up. By melt processing at fairly low temperature (currently 250 °C), costs could be reduced and scale-up becomes more feasible. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers melt process phenethylammonium lead iodide, or analogous material, and via a simple cation exchange process create films that are promising photovoltaic materials.

Advantage:
• Low temperature synthesis
• Limited harmful solvents
• Amenable to scale-up

Application:
Tandem solar cell, perovskite solar cells

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]]>Fri, 04 May 2018 14:49:12 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/276564739Fri, 04 May 2018 14:49:12 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Typical processing techniques of organolead mixed halide perovskites require dissolution of the individual single halide species before deposition of thin films (most commonly by spin coating or film casting). The precipitated species have questionable homogeneity and require regulated VOCs. These “air toxic” solvents have been a limiting factor for scale-up. By melt processing at fairly low temperature (currently 250 °C), costs could be reduced and scale-up becomes more feasible. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers melt process phenethylammonium lead iodide, or analogous material, and via a simple cation exchange process create films that are promising photovoltaic materials.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Tandem solar cell, perovskite solar cellsDesc0000.pngStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:MarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseCerium, Cobalt and Copper Alloy doped with Tantalum or/and Iron as a Permanent Magnet Materialhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/27626Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have develop a gap magnet that utilizes trace amount of cheaper, abundant and non-critical cerium (Ce) as an alternative to critical rare-earths containing magnet alloys. This invention makes the magnet significantly cheaper and less dependent on supplies of rare-earth materials, with that performance surpasses the levels of commercial ferrite and AlNiCo magnets, and approaches the performance of neodymium-based and samarium cobalt magnets.

Description:
Permanent magnets are broadly classified into four segments based on composition and magnet strength, from low performing and inexpensive iron magnets, to magnetically stronger but more expensive AlNiCo magnets, to higher performing (and particularly valuable for high temperature applications) SmCo magnets, to the most powerful and most expensive NdFeB magnets. Since magnet performance is not a linear function as one moves from one composition to another, there exists gaps in performance between groupings.  Between AlNiCo and SmCo magnets, which serve niche market applications, there is room for a gap magnet with magnetic performance between AlNiCo magnets and SmCo/NeFeB magnets and with an intermediate price as well. 

ISURF #04624 describes a gap magnet family that provides intermediate performance but at a price point closer to that of entry level magnets by substituting the abundant rare earth metal cerium (Ce) in place of samarium in high-flux magnets. Material costs are further reduced by substituting copper and iron for cobalt.  Trace amounts of tantalum in the alloy results in dramatically improved coercivity when compared to baseline alloys. It is also expected that higher usage of Ce will help improve profitability of rare earth mining operations and help address the criticality of the other rare earth elements.

Advantage:
• Retain or/and improve magnetic performance
• Utilize trace amount of abundant, cheaper, non-critical Ceium (Ce) as alternative to critical rare-earths
• Reduce material and processing costs
• Gap magnet addresses applications not being tapped by current magnet technologies.

Application:
These gap magnet alloys provide sufficient performance to be a substitute at the low end of NdFeB performance but at a dramatically lower cost.

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]]>Mon, 30 Apr 2018 10:48:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/276264624Mon, 30 Apr 2018 11:00:36 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

ISURF #04624 describes a gap magnet family that provides intermediate performance but at a price point closer to that of entry level magnets by substituting the abundant rare earth metal cerium (Ce) in place of samarium in high-flux magnets. Material costs are further reduced by substituting copper and iron for cobalt.  Trace amounts of tantalum in the alloy results in dramatically improved coercivity when compared to baseline alloys. It is also expected that higher usage of Ce will help improve profitability of rare earth mining operations and help address the criticality of the other rare earth elements.

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]]>Application:]]>Desc0000.pngStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseNi-Co-Mn-Ti Intermetallics with Enhanced Magnetocaloric Properties Prepared by Combination of Different Methodshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/27396Summary:
Iowa State University (ISU) and Ames Laboratory (AL) researchers have developed a method to manufacture Ni-Co-Mn-Ti intermetallics with enhanced magnetocaloric properties. The resultant materials produce an extremely large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) with a modest magnetic field change. The MCE is nearly three times greater at near room temperature than the same material made via conventional processing.

Description:
Magnetocaloric materials undergo a change in temperature when subjected to the application and removal of a magnetic field. While a number of magnetocaloric materials have been discovered, most have not been commercialized. Reasons for this vary, but the cost of the raw material, weak magnetocaloric effect, and/or poor physical properties such as volumetric change in response to magnetic field and resulting brittleness have hampered development efforts.
ISU and AL researchers have discovered a method for making an intermetallic compound that improves the mechanical and magnetocaloric properties of the alloys. In addition, the researchers have substituted cheaper elements into the alloys to create an extended family of compounds. The method involves rapid solidification of the melt alloy, promoting a more homogenous mixture of the elements and a different microstructure compared to conventional casting methods. This technology enhances the magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Co-Mn-Ti-based intermetallics.

Advantage:
• Method provides up to 3x greater MCE compared to conventional methods.
• The properties of the materials prepared are highly tunable through changing materials’ compositions.
• The materials’ operation temperatures can be further tuned by annealing at different temperatures.
• The materials are compatible with metal or polymeric binders and may be used to fabricate composite parts.
• Compositional variants could reduce cost.
• No need of heat-treatment.

Application:
Commercial magnetic refrigeration.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 20 Mar 2018 08:35:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/273964666Tue, 20 Mar 2018 08:35:38 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU and AL researchers have discovered a method for making an intermetallic compound that improves the mechanical and magnetocaloric properties of the alloys. In addition, the researchers have substituted cheaper elements into the alloys to create an extended family of compounds. The method involves rapid solidification of the melt alloy, promoting a more homogenous mixture of the elements and a different microstructure compared to conventional casting methods. This technology enhances the magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Co-Mn-Ti-based intermetallics.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Commercial magnetic refrigeration.Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePolymers for Caloric Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/27208Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new polymeric material that provides a larger electrocaloric effect than previously known polymer materials.

Description:
Highly-efficient, solid-state cooling devices offer the promise of greatly improved energy efficiency relative to vapor-compression refrigeration systems.  These cooling devices take advantage of the caloric effect that some materials undergo in the presence of electrical or magnetic fields or in response to stress.  The particular characteristics of the material, and the magnitude of the caloric effect relative to the external field or stress, will determine the success of the cooling system.

Polar fluorinated polymers have been shown to have a large electrocaloric effect, but thus far the magnitude of that effect has been insufficient to build practical cooling devices.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a family of fluorinated polymers with enhanced electrocaloric effect relative to those previously known.  The researcher are in the process of demonstrating the improved performance of the materials in a variety of applications.

Advantage:
• Larger electrocaloric effect than other polymeric materials.

Application:
Electrocaloric cooling

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 26 Feb 2018 13:02:54 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/272084628Mon, 26 Feb 2018 13:03:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Polar fluorinated polymers have been shown to have a large electrocaloric effect, but thus far the magnitude of that effect has been insufficient to build practical cooling devices.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a family of fluorinated polymers with enhanced electrocaloric effect relative to those previously known.  The researcher are in the process of demonstrating the improved performance of the materials in a variety of applications.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseFeedstock and Heterogeneous Structure for Tough Rare Earth Permanent Magnets and Production Process Thereofhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/27195Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for producing rare earth permanent magnets (REPMs) that reduces their susceptibility to breakage. The process involves unitizing a bimodal or multimodal size distribution of powders in isostatic pressing, which minimizes crack propagation along the grain boundaries of the magnet. This invention significantly enhanced flexural strength and fracture toughness while maintaining the hard magnetic properties.

Description:
Among three basic classes of permanent magnets, sintered magnets, bonded magnets and additive manufacturing, the sintered magnets are the highest performing. Sintered magnets produce up to twice the magnetic field strength of bonded magnets and have an energy density up to four times higher. However, one of the weakness of sintered magnets is their brittleness, as they easily crack, particularly during machining or as a results of external stress.

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have demonstrated enhanced toughness and improved magnetic performance by producing novel tough REPMs with heterogeneous structures, such as bi-modal, tri-modal, multi-modal or gradient grained structures, or other microstructural heterogeneity. This invention not only improves the magnet manufacturing efficiency and machinability, it reduces part failure rate, and effectively uses expensive critical materials. It also greatly expands the market for this class of permanent magnets. Tougher and fracture resistant magnets offer opportunities for new applications, new shapes, and lower costs. Tougher REPMs also make it possible for production of bulky magnets with even higher magnetic performance and larger dimensions via optimization of alloy composition and heat treatment process.

Advantage:
• Enhanced toughness and improved magnetic performance
• Effective use of expensive critical materials
• Improved the magnet manufacturing efficiency and machinability
• Increased resistance to chipping in machining, reducing part failure rate
• Simple technology to integrate into production

Application:
Improved mechanical properties for sintered REPMs, with the potential to enable new applications, new shapes, and lower costs for sintered magnets.

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]]>Wed, 21 Feb 2018 13:41:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/271954673Wed, 21 Feb 2018 14:13:39 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have demonstrated enhanced toughness and improved magnetic performance by producing novel tough REPMs with heterogeneous structures, such as bi-modal, tri-modal, multi-modal or gradient grained structures, or other microstructural heterogeneity. This invention not only improves the magnet manufacturing efficiency and machinability, it reduces part failure rate, and effectively uses expensive critical materials. It also greatly expands the market for this class of permanent magnets. Tougher and fracture resistant magnets offer opportunities for new applications, new shapes, and lower costs. Tougher REPMs also make it possible for production of bulky magnets with even higher magnetic performance and larger dimensions via optimization of alloy composition and heat treatment process.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Improved mechanical properties for sintered REPMs, with the potential to enable new applications, new shapes, and lower costs for sintered magnets.Desc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:CraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePreparation of mixed metal chalcogenides by mechanochemical processsing and exfoliationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25371Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for easily creating interlayer solid solutions of mixed metal chalcogenides.

Description:
Mixed metal chalcogenides have numerous applications as oil lubricant additives, photocatalysts, battery materials, super-capacitor electrodes thermoelectric materials, hydrogen storage materials and in a number of photoelectronic materials.  The currently available routes for obtaining these compounds in an interlayer solid solution are either expensive or difficult to scale. Iowa State University researchers, in conjunction with Ames Laboratory, have developed  methods for creating these valuable materials through simple and cheap mechanical means, exploiting mechanical exfoliation of metal chalcogenides in the liquid or solid phase.  Using these techniques, ISU researchers were able to gain access to mixed metal chalcogenides that were previously unreported, primary through the mixing of two binary chalcogenides to create a mixed metal/mixed chalcogenides. This high-throughput method is expected to reduce cost and complexity of production and is able to support easy adoption into industrial production.

Advantage:
• Cheap and simple manufacturing
• Easily scalable

Application:
Batteries, energy storage, photovoltaics, lubricants

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253714629Thu, 11 Jan 2018 10:39:30 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:

]]>Desc0000.pngStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:MarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduMaterials| Ames LaboratoryFalsePassivation of reactive gas atomized titanium aluminide powderhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19675Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to control and retain halogen alloy additions to titanium aluminide powders in the form of a surface film.

Description:
Doping of titanium aluminide with small concentration of halogen atoms has been demonstrated to greatly enhance the resistance of the metal to oxidation.  Previous methods to create a thin, halogen containing exterior film such as ion-implantation have proven ineffective, and alternate powder metallurgy approaches provide little control over the amount of halogen incorporated into the powders.  The tailored in situ powder coating approach presented here provides for the incorporation of halogen in an alloy microstructure as an oxy-halogen by powder consolidation.  This chemical reservoir of oxy-halogen promotes renewable formation of a nanometer-scale exterior protective film with higher thermal stability and increased surface oxidation resistance.

Advantage:
• Reduces pyrophoriscity of atomized titanium aluminide powder
• Increases oxidation resistance for high temperature operation

Application:
Titanium powders for high temperature components

References:
1: "Performance of Composite Pour Tubes for Titanium Close Coupled Atomization”, A. Heidloff, TITANIUM 2012, Hilton Atlanta, Atlanta, October 2012.

Development Stage:
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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196754110Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:45:33 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to control and retain halogen alloy additions to titanium aluminide powders in the form of a surface film.

]]>Description:Doping of titanium aluminide with small concentration of halogen atoms has been demonstrated to greatly enhance the resistance of the metal to oxidation.  Previous methods to create a thin, halogen containing exterior film such as ion-implantation have proven ineffective, and alternate powder metallurgy approaches provide little control over the amount of halogen incorporated into the powders.  The tailored in situ powder coating approach presented here provides for the incorporation of halogen in an alloy microstructure as an oxy-halogen by powder consolidation.  This chemical reservoir of oxy-halogen promotes renewable formation of a nanometer-scale exterior protective film with higher thermal stability and increased surface oxidation resistance.

]]>Advantage:• Reduces pyrophoriscity of atomized titanium aluminide powder ]]>• Increases oxidation resistance for high temperature operation]]>Application:Titanium powders for high temperature components

]]>References:1: "Performance of Composite Pour Tubes for Titanium Close Coupled Atomization”, A. Heidloff, TITANIUM 2012, Hilton Atlanta, Atlanta, October 2012.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials| Ames LaboratoryPassivation and Alloying Element Retention In Gas Atomized PowdersUtilityUnited States9,833,83714/120,7066/18/201412/5/20178/20/203512/15/20172/9/2018FalseControlled Metal Photodepositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19193Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a reliable method for synthesis of semiconductor-metal heterostructures to enable application of materials in catalytic, magnetic, and opto-electronic devices.

Description:
Interest in the synthesis of colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid nanostructures has grown exponentially in recent years. Laser spot irradiation has been reported to have some control over metal deposition; however, this process has low yields and requires expensive equipment.  It also has the potential to change the structure of the metal deposit as a result of the high energy intensity of the laser. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have discovered a method that enables illumination of much larger areas at a time and that provides unprecedented control over deposition locale. This could lead to a larger synthetic throughput and wider general availability of finely-structured semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures. Initial studies of the process to obtain II.VI semiconductor (cadmium selenium/sulfide) nanorods with active metal (either platinum or palladium) nanoparticles have shown that the heterostructrues become redox-active upon illumination and are capable of mediating photo-induced chemical transformations. The technology results in better, cheaper and more widely available photocatalytic materials for renewable energy and environmental remediation applications.

Advantage:
• Controlled fabrication of colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures
• High yields of site-selective nanoparticles
• Simple, scalable method for metal photodeposition

Application:
Metal photodeposition for catalytic and magnetic materials, as well as opto-electronic devices.

References:
1. "Expanding the One-Dimensional CdS-CdSe Composition Landscape: Acially Anisotropic CdS1-xSexNanorods," T. Purnima, A. Ruberu, and J. Vela, 2011, ACS Nano 5(7): 5775 - 5784

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis of the semi-conductor-metal heterostructures has been accomplished on a laboratory scale, samples are available for testing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png


 

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:59 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191933956Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:43:40 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:1. "Expanding the One-Dimensional CdS-CdSe Composition Landscape: Acially Anisotropic CdS1-xSexNanorods," T. Purnima, A. Ruberu, and J. Vela, 2011, ACS Nano 5(7): 5775 - 5784

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Controlled Fabrication of Semiconductor-Metal Hybrid Nano-Heterostructures via Site-Selective Metal PhotodepositionUtilityUnited States9,834,85613/733,9751/4/201312/5/20172/13/203612/15/20178/7/2018FalseRecovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rare earth elementshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21023Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:50:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210234150Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:15:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 4391: Recovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractant

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Recovering Heavy Rare Earth Metals From Magnet ScrapUtilityUnited States9,725,78814/545,9947/15/20158/8/20172/14/203612/15/201712/15/2017FalseDouble lens device for tunable harmonic generation of laser beams in KKBBF/RBBF crystalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21825Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an improvement to KBBF crystal systems for the generation of ultraviolet laser light by creating an alternative prism geometry that eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling devices.

Description:
Lasers consisting of light from the ultra-violet portion of the spectrum have both scientific and commercial applications. Scientifically, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lasers can be used in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic parameters of solids. Commercially VUV lasers are of interest in semiconductor manufacturing, as the wavelength of the higher frequency spectra could produce much finer structures using photolithography. One source for generation of VUV lasers is passing a lower frequency laser beam through potassium beryllium fluoroborate (KBBF) crystals, resulting in a harmonic frequency laser. For economic reasons, KBBF crystals are grown very thin; as incident light upon the crystals is at a very acute angle, the resultant VUV laser has a low efficiency as most of the light is subsequently reflected off the surface of the crystal.

Advantage:
• Generates desired ultraviolet laser light
• Alternative prism geometry
• Eliminates the need for contacting fluid or optical coupling
• Allows for easy tuning of the laser beam

Application:
Laser optics, Semiconductor manufacturing

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:15:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/218254246Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:09:46 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Double Lens Device for Tunable Harmonic Generation Of Laser Beams in KBBF/RBBF Crystals or Other Non-Linear Optic MaterialsUtilityUnited States9,740,08114/627,9252/20/20158/22/20176/19/203512/15/20175/4/2018FalseLinearly Polarized Thermal Emitter for More Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Deviceshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19246Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed fabrication methods for a polarized thermal emitter than can be used to create more efficient thermophotovoltaic devices for power generation.

Description:
Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices can be used to generate power from photons, and consist of a thermal emitter and photodiode.  These devices can be used to help overcome limitations of photovoltatic (PV) devices solar cells—since sunlight is composed of many different wavelengths, not all incident photons have an energy larger than the energy band gap (Eg) of the semiconducting material of the photodiode and thus, not all photons can contribute to the photo-current.  If the thermal emitter of a TPV can absorb all incoming photons without discrimination and re-emit photons within a narrow range of energy that is optimized for the Eg of the photodiode, in principle, all energy carried by the incident photons can contribute for electricity generation, which leads results in enhanced energy conversion efficiency.  While thermal radiation from a thermal source is usually unpolarized, a class of micro-structures termed polarized thermal emitters can emit polarized thermal radiation; polarized thermal emitters avoid the energy loss usually incurred by filtering because they preferentially emit photons via their structural anisotropy, and thus can improve the efficiency of TPVs.  ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have now fabricated layer-by-layer photonic crystals that can be used for linearly polarized thermal emission.  This thermal emitter in conjunction with a sub-wavelength grating shows properties that are desirable for polarized thermal emitters for TPVs, including a high extinction ratio and high emissivity.  In addition, the emission range can be tuned by controlling the periodicity of the sub-wavelength grating.  The linearly polarized thermal emitter may thus have utility for improving the efficiency of TPVs used for power generation.

Advantage:
• Highly polarized thermal emission available at normal emergence
• High thermal radiation power
• Tunable emission range

References:
“Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The photonic crystals used to create the polarized thermal emitter have been demonstrated to enable control of both spectral emissivity and polarization in thermal radiation, and samples are available for testing. ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192463583Tue, 05 Dec 2017 08:40:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:References:Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating”, Jae-Hwang Lee, Wai Leung, Tae Guen Kim, Kristen Constant, and Kai-Ming Ho, 2008, Optics Express 16:8742-8747

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals for Linearly-Polarized Thermal Emission and Thermophotovoltaic Device Including SameUtilityUnited States9,400,21912/754,6574/6/20107/26/20164/8/20339/13/20164/30/2018FalseLow-Cost Production Method for Alloys Used in Harsh Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19434Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a series of alloy design and powder or spray processing steps that lead to the low-cost production of oxidation or corrosion resistant metallic alloys.

Description:
Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure to corrosive gases; these alloys must also be able to resist high cycle fatigue, extreme surface wear, and long-term creep deformation.  Iron (Fe)-based superalloys have been developed through a mechanical alloying process that results in a dispersoid strengthened metallic material.  However, mechanical alloying can add significant costs for making alloys that perform well in high temperature environments because it requires expensive milling equipment and extensive milling time; thus commercial applications may be limited.  The long milling time required can also lead to contamination within the alloy powders.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames laboratory researchers have developed a method of making dispersoid strengthened, corrosion/oxidation resistant atomized alloy powder particles for high temperature structural applications.  The method employs gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) linked with alloy design and atomizing parameters to result in the low-cost production of corrosion and/or oxidation resistant metallic alloy particles which are strengthened by disperoids that are highly resistant to coarsening and strength degradation at elevated temperatures.  This new molten metal processing technique can thus result in precision parts with superior properties.

Advantage:
• Economical (simplified process reduces costs and eliminates mechanical alloying process)
• Scalable (commercial productions rates are higher than those for mechanical alloying)
• Effective (enables control of batch-to-batch variation and contamination)

Application:
Powder Metallury Processing

Stage3.png
Development Stage:
Lab scale demonstration

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:27 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194343362Tue, 21 Nov 2017 07:54:09 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingUtilityUnited States7,699,90511/429,9185/8/20064/20/201012/29/20275/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingCIPUnited States8,603,21312/072,2982/25/200812/10/201311/14/20285/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,197,57412/660,3542/25/20106/12/20125/8/20265/14/201511/13/2017Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States8,864,87013/506,6835/9/201210/21/20146/17/20265/14/20152/21/2018Dispersoid Reinforced Alloy Powder and Method of MakingDivisionalUnited States9,782,82714/121,4159/3/201410/10/20172/19/202711/21/20175/21/2018FalseSelective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Productshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19196Summary:
Researchers have developed a method for utilizing ozone for oxidation of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes that enables a rapid and controlled rate of catalysis and is also an environmentally friendly and versatile technology.

Description:
Ozone is recognized as a potent and effective oxidizing agent with numerous commercial uses, including use as an industrial oxidant and water treatment.  Building on research related to iron catalysis in oxidations by ozone, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an approach for selective oxidation in an environmentally friendly manner to obtain industrially important aldehydes and ketones. Because this approach uses mild reaction conditions and eliminates toxic waste compounds, it may have utility for the production of aldehydes and ketones, whose versatile properties make them valuable starting materials for numerous products.

Advantage:
• Rapid and controlled rate of catalysis
• Environmentally friendly: ozone naturally decomposes to oxygen)
• Versatile: may be used for any applications and/or substrates for which ozone is used as an oxidant)

Application:
Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones.

References:
"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
This technology has been tested and proven effective, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:39:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191963901Tue, 21 Nov 2017 07:47:02 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:"Aqueous FeIV=O: Spectroscopic Identification and Oxo Group Exchange", Oleg Pestovsky, Sebastian Stoian, Emile L. Bominaar, Xiaopeng Shan, Eckard Munck, Lawrence Que, Jr., and Andreja Bakac, 2005, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44:6871-6874.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized ProductsUtilityUnited States8,507,73013/434,9003/30/20128/13/20133/30/20325/5/201511/13/2017FalseAlignment Promoted in Heat Treatable Magnets Through Application of External Applied Magnetic Field at the Start of Binder-Assisted Moldinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/26602Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to produce sintered, final-shape magnets with high density and aligned microstructure.  The resulting permanent magnets feature higher energy product and improved remanence versus standard processing, with improved performance in motors and generators.

Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to create AlNiCo magnets in near final shape with improved energy product and remanence versus magnets produced without using directional solidification or zone refinement.  Magnets resulting from this process are characterized by highly controlled and aligned microstructure in the solid state.  Magnet alloy precursor powder is aligned while being added to the mold, with compression molding locking the aligned particles in place.  The resulting microstructural template for grain growth persists through a thermal de-binding treatment and sintering of the magnet.

Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

Advantage:
• Near net-shape production of permanent magnets with high anisotropy and energy product.
• Compatible with techniques to enhance alignment through application of uni-axial loading during sintering.
• De-binding and sintering removes binder material, leaving a highly-dense anisotropic sintered magnet.

Application:
Permanent magnets, especially for motors and electrical generators.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/266024695Mon, 20 Nov 2017 12:35:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

Magnets produced by this molding process display enhanced energy density, as well as optimized coercivity and magnetization, and have the potential for high volume manufacturing because they are manufactured in near-final shapes.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseModular Unit for Thermal Conductivity Measurements in Multiple Cryogenic/Magnetic Field Environmentshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/24096Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a modular sample stage and thermal conductivity measurement device that is compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field apparatus.  This modular device allows for easy switching between apparatus to perform a variety of measurements without sample or thermometer remounting.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Description:
The thermal conductivity of a material is of great importance for determining suitability for a given application.  While many techniques have been developed to measure thermal conductivity at moderate temperatures, measurement at low (sub-kelvin) temperatures are difficult to achieve.  These low temperature measurements are important to characterize novel materials, particularly in determining the superconducting state while isolating electronic degrees of freedom.

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

Advantage:
• Modular sample stage and measurement device compatible with a variety of cryogenic and magnetic field devices.
• Minimizes sample handling and mounting and eliminates experimental error from different thermometers and calibration.

Application:
Low temperature (< 1K) thermal conductivity characterization of novel materials.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:11:13 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/240964582Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:47 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

As there is no singular cyrogenic solution for measurement of thermal conductivity that can cover broad ranges of temperature, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction, thorough characterization requires the sample to be tested in multiple apparatus.  A modular and portable sample stage and conductivity measurement device that can be readily moved between apparatus, and is compatible with broad temperature and magnetic field ranges, is desirable to reduce the error introduced by multiple setups as well as different thermometers and calibrations.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseAcid-Free Dissolution and Separation of Rare-earth Metalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23707Summary:
ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to effectively recycle rare earth elements through simple REDOX reactions allowing for aqueous processing. This replaces the need for dangerous and environmentally unfriendly acids.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Description:
Rare earth elements (REE) have seen a sharp increase in use in a number of technical materials such as high density and high temperature tolerant permanent magnets, lamp phosphors, catalysts, rechargeable batteries and many other technologies related to a transition to a greener economy. With China controlling more than 90% of REE output and increasingly stringent export quotas, the world at large faces a risk of supply disruption. Recycling of spent materials is therefore crucially important. ISU researchers have developed a novel approach to recycling REEs (particularly neodymium and dysprosium) by dissolving REE containing metal scrap in a reducing aqueous solution. After simple processing of the solubilized material, pure REE-oxides can be recovered. Recovery yield of the REE-oxides are typically greater than 95%. The use of aqueous reduction to dissolve the REE replaces the need for environmentally unfriendly acid use.

Advantage:
• Cost effective and time efficient
• Environmentally friendly
• Expected to scale efficiently
• Applicable to small or large scale operation

Application:
Recycling rare earth elements

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:05:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/237074443Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:19 GMTSummary:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Recycling rare earth elementsPatent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseDevelopment of Enhanced AlNiCo Magnetshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22092Summary:
ISU and Ames Lab researchers have developed a method for producing AlNiCo magnets that employs the substitution of less expensive materials for cobalt in the AlNiCo alloy.

Description:
AlNiCo magnets account for a little more than four thousand metric tons of material with a market value of $280mn. AlNiCo magnets are often used as a replacement magnet for ferrite magnets when high temperature performance is required. Raw materials are estimated to account for approximately 33% of the cost of AlNiCo magnets, with the most expensive element being cobalt. The technology involves the substitution of less expensive materials for cobalt therefore significantly reducing production costs. Previous attempts at this substitution have almost exclusively used a 1:1 substitution of iron for cobalt. The results have been a decrease in the performance of the magnet with the increased substitution. The inventors have used a different approach to substitution, substituting several low cost elements for cobalt. The resulting magnet not only matches the performance of a traditional AlNiCo magnet, but production time is significantly reduced and can occur a much lower temperatures further reducing production costs.

Advantage:
• Reduced material costs
• Produced at lower temperatures
• Shorter production time
• Reduced overall production cost

Application:
Magnet production and scientific research 

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 26 May 2016 11:16:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/220924355Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:21 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsFalseMetamaterials-Based Device for Generation of Broadband Terahertz Radiationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21453Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a metamaterials-based terahertz emitter that could drastically improve communication speeds and imaging resolution.

Description:
The terahertz gap, which lies between the infrared and millimeter spectral regions (from approximately 100 GHz to 15THz) poses one of the most demanding challenges for technology and fundamental science today. The lack of efficient light sources and detectors makes THz physics one of the least explored parts of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. This is despite the underlying demand in the fields of communication and sensing, to push the gigahertz switching speed limit of today’s logic/memory/wireless communication devices into the terahertz range and to extend the conventional visible/infrared spectrum of today’s security and medical imaging devices into the THz spectrum, which provides more transparency and has more distinct spatial signatures suitable for non-invasive and label-free imaging.

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

Advantage:
• Faster communication/computing speeds
• Further miniaturization of devices
• Improved resolution imaging
• Label-free evaluation
• Metamaterial-based emitter outperforms thin film and crystal-based emitters

Application:
Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and Scientific

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 22 Feb 2016 12:25:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/214534109Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:54 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

ISU researchers have accomplished efficient broadband, single-cycle THz pulse generation by developing a novel THz emitter from metamaterials. This efficient and compact THz source is extremely useful for many applications including integrated nano-photonics and nano-electronic circuits, high-speed information and communication technology and ultra-small, non-invasive biological and medical evaluation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Imaging (medical and security), Communication, Manufacturing and ScientificStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Broadband Terahertz Generation of MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,684,22114/989,5651/6/20166/20/20171/6/20367/17/201711/13/2017FalseMethods of room temperature cold-plastic forming or patterning of amorphous alloyshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21130Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to form amorphous metal alloys at room temperature without introducing shear bands or micro-crystalline structure into the alloy.

Description:
Amorphous alloys are desirable for use in high precision parts because the mechanical properties of these alloys, combined with the lack of grain boundaries, make them particularly suitable for fine-scale imprinting and patterning.  Thermo-plastic forming has often been utilized to form glassy metals, though this technique is inappropriate at room temperature because of the development of narrow shear bands in the metal.  These shear bands induce brittleness into the metal, often resulting in catastrophic failure of the part.  Various techniques may be used to achieve sufficient deformability of the alloy, including adding crystalline particles to create a second phase, controlling the deformation geometry, and raising the processing temperature of the alloy.  All of these techniques result in shortcomings in the resultant product.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

Advantage:
• Room temperature processing avoids embrittlement formed by sub-Tg annealing
• Process does not induce generation of shear bands in the alloy
• Provides control over deformation behavior of bulk amorphous alloys

Application:
Forming and patterning of bulk amorphous metal alloys

References:
Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 17 Dec 2015 10:26:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/211304181Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method to cold-plastic form typically brittle Hf-based amorphous alloys by controlling the homogenous flow of the material.  This technique avoids increasing the brittleness of the alloy during thermoplastic forming.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:Song-Yi Kim, Eun-Soo Park, Ryan T. Ott, Thomas A. Lograsso, Moo-Young Huh, Do-Hyang Kim,  Jürgen Eckert and Min-Ha Lee, “Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature”, Scientific Reports, 5, 16540, 2015.  DOI: 10.1038/srep16540

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21069Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210694135Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 3958: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseA general efficient Gutzwiller solver for electronic structure simulation packagehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21068Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast solver for the Gutzwiller approximation for electronic structure of atoms.

Description:
State of the art computational tools for atomic modeling use the Local Density Approximation Density Functional Theory (LDADFT).  However, LDADFT often has issues in properly describing situations which include van der Waals forces, charge transfer and transition states.  Simultaneously optimizing the three sets of parameters in the Gutzwiller approximation can address some of these specific situations and produce a more accurate model.
ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

Advantage:
• Gutzwiller approximation for models not adequately addressed by LDADFT-based tools
• Common-parameter approach provides faster solution than first principles approach

Application:
Commercial and/or research tools for computational analysis of atomic structure

References:
1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].

Intellectual Property:
Copyrighted Material - Software

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:45:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210683958Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:43 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISURF #03958 provides a solver for the Gutzwiller approximation from first principles.  ISURF #04135 takes an alternative approach, starting with a set of common parameters for optimization rather than starting from first principles.  For the majority of applications, ISURF #04135 produces as an accurate model as does ISURF #03958 but in a much faster computation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. Y.X. Yao et al., “The benchmark of Gutzwiller density functional theory in hydrogen systems”, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 112, pp. 240-246, 2011.

2. N. Lanatàet al., “Gutzwiller Renormalization Group”, arXiv:1509.05441 [cond-mat.str-el].
]]>Intellectual Property:Copyrighted Material - SoftwareGroup:ISURF 4135: A General Efficient Gutzwiller Solver for Electronic Structure Simulation Package (software)

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseRecovering rare earth metals using bismuth extractanthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21024Summary:
Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute researchers have developed a two stage extraction process to selectively separate neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets.

Description:
Many of the technologies important to reducing green-house gas emissions involve the use of permanent magnets, specifically NdFeB magnets.  Found in automotive motors, consumer electronics and in wind turbine generators, these high-energy permanent magnets play an important in our everyday lives.  Despite their widespread use and the incorporation of rare earth elements in the magnets, it is estimated that perhaps as little as one percent of rare earth metals are recycled from spent and waste magnets.

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

Advantage:
• Process may be used in either one step (recovery of both light and heavy rare earth elements) or in two steps (recovery of light and heavy rare earth elements separately) process
• Easy recovery of target metals from extractant by rotary evaporation
• Near quantitative yield of rare earth elements

Application:
Rare earth element recycling from spent or scrap magnets

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:57:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210244391Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

One of the factors that impact recycling is the harsh conditions that are typically involved in the recycling process.  ISURF #04150 and #04391 use pyrometallurgical techniques to selectively extract the rare earth elements from NdFeB magnets, leaving the iron and boron residue behind.  The first extraction step uses liquid magnesium to selectively remove neodymium from the magnet, while the second step utilizes liquid bismuth to remove the dysprosium.  The rare earth elements are readily recovered from the extractant using rotary evaporation.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4150: Recovery of dysprosium-enriched iron alloy from magnet scrap alloy via selective separation of rear earth elements

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseChemical Separation of Terbium Oxidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20985Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive and environmentally-friendly method to separate terbium oxide from other trivalent rare earth oxides.

Description:
According to the recent U.S. Department of Energy report “Critical Materials Strategy”, terbium ranks amongst the five most critical rare earth elements (along with dysprosium, neodymium, europium and yttrium).  Unfortunately, these heavy rare earth elements can be difficult to separate from one another because of their chemical similarity.  Current separation methods contain multistage processes which often utilize hazardous reagents, resulting in high capital and operating costs to obtain these important elements.
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

Advantage:
• Effective separation of Tb4O7 from other heavy rare earth element oxides (greater than 99.5% purity)
• Environmentally friendly – water based with no hazardous chemicals
• Cost effective – readily sourced and disposed of mild acids, minimal number of stages reduces capital costs
• Fast reaction rate

Application:
Recycling and purification of terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other sources

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:03 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209854351Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that readily separates terbium oxide from other rare earth oxides by taking advantage of differential dissolution rates for the REEs in dilute organic acids.  The process is effective, with yield of terbium oxide in excess of 70% and purity of at least 99.5%.  The process is readily applicable to recycling processes to recover terbium oxide from lamp phosphors and other applications.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSelective Chemical Separation of Rare-Earth Oxalateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20984Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a cost effective step that easily separates rare earth oxalates into a light rare earth stream and a heavy rare earth stream.

Description:
For many rare earth ores, the percentage of the valuable heavy rare earths (in particular, terbium, europium, dysprosium, yttrium and gadolinium) in the ore is very low, making separation and recovery of these elements from the other rare earths not cost-effective.  Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process that can be added on to conventional ore processing that readily separates rare earth oxalates into two streams, one containing the light rare earths (La – Sm) and the other containing heavy rare earths (Gd – Y).  This one step process requires no special equipment and minimal capital investment.  The process is water-based, and uses a “green” extractant to remove the heavy REEs from the light REEs.

Advantage:
• Chemical separation of rare earth elements into high-value and low-value streams
• Simple and fast – one-step process does not require special process equipment
• Environmentally friendly – uses green extract in place of hazardous organophosphorous compounds
• Cost effective

Application:
Rare earth ore processing

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 14:07:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/209844327Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Rare earth ore processingPatent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseLubricated Mechanical Nanopolishing and Motor Oil for Self-Healing Metals and Ceramicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20754Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to produce extremely flat and smooth surfaces on hard materials without involving a chemical etchant.

Description:
Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a process used to create defect-free, smooth and flat surfaces, primarily for the semiconductor industry, and involves both mechanical polishing and chemical etching. CMP slurries (which provide the physical interface between the sample and the polishing equipment) typically consist of an abrasive (most often a metal oxide such as silica, ceria, alumina or zirconia), a liquid medium (normally water, but can be others depending on the application), and chemical agents (oxidizers, bases, acids) which treat the surface.
By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

Advantage:
• A 2 to 3 fold increase in surface smoothness
• Applicable to many hard surfaces
• May be extended to internal combustion engine lubricants
• May increase energy efficiency in treated engines

Application:
Semiconductor manufacture and internal combustion engine lubricants

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage3.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207544333Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:02 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:By tweaking the abrasive composition and size as well as the liquid medium, this technology removes the need for a chemical agent and can provide a nearly atomically flat surface. Through multiple steps, this process can create much flatter and smoother surfaces than produced using commercial materials (rough mean square roughness of 0.314nm versus 0.753nm for conventional polishing).

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage3.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal hydrides at room temperaturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19738Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have demonstrated a mechanochemical process to produce alkali metal hydrides at room temperature and moderate hydrogen gas pressure with quantitative yields

Description:
Metal hydride synthesis typically involves either heating metals under a stream of hydrogen or employing transition metal catalysts and liquid hydrocarbons, thus requiring an additional purification step.  This new method of production allows for the use of simple mechanochemical processes at ambient temperature and slightly elevated hydrogen pressures.  Quantitative yields, short reaction times (depending on milling intensity and hydrogen pressure) and freedom from catalysts and solvent, this process should provide significant cost advantages versus traditional processing.  In addition, this process is safer than traditional processes as there is no risk of hydrogen accumulation and explosion.

Advantage:
• Rapid and inexpensive large-scale production of alkali-metal hydrides
• Scalable process easily adapted for continuous processing
• Dry and catalyst-free process requires no further solvent removal or purification steps

Application:
Metal hydride synthesis

References:
Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 07:46:05 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197384316Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:44 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| MaterialsMethod of Making Alkali Metal HydridesUtilityUnited States9,663,36414/757,13211/23/20155/30/201711/23/20356/21/201711/13/2017FalsepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19578Description:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an invention which provides novel gel forming methacrylic blocking copolymers that exhibit cationic pH-sensitive behavior as well as good water solubility. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic( polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) polymer. The polymers may be use for drug and gene delivery, protein separation, as structural supplements, and more.

Advantage:
• These copolymers are water-soluble, pH sensitive and capable of thermoreversible gelation near physiological temperatures.

Application:
* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplements

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195782954Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:36 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:Application:* Drug delivery * Gene delivery * Protein separation * Structural supplementsStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Synthesis routes have been defined and materials have been produced, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Ames Laboratory| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Materials| Veterinary MedicinepH-Sensitive Methacrylic Copolymer Gels and the Production ThereofUtilityUnited States7,217,77610/366,8642/14/20035/15/20072/14/20235/22/201512/18/2018FalseAluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25372Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength, lightweight aluminum wire for high-voltage power transmission with reduced electrical resistance for overhead electrical lines.

Description:
High-voltage electric power transmission cables based on pure aluminum strands with a stranded steel core (ACSR) or stranded aluminum alloy (ACAR) core have the disadvantages of mediocre tensile strength, high density, and poor strength and conductivity retention at elevated temperatures. This combination of properties causes excessive sag in overload situations and limits the mechanical tension the cables can bear in icing and high wind situations. Alternative materials that increase cable strength generally have poor conductivity and/or high cost. Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have discovered a method to produce an aluminum matrix wire composite with reduced density that adds strength while retaining maximum ampacity.

Advantage:
• Simple (manufacturing methods are similar to those used now)
• Effective (high electrical conductivity and strength at both ambient and high temperatures)
• Economical (use of low cost materials)

Application:
High-voltage wires and cables for electrical transmission

References:
1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

Stage1.png
Development Stage:
The Al/Ca composite has demonstrated promising corrosion resistance and elevated temperature performance properties while creep and fatigue strengths are being investigated.

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 14:03:36 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253723794Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:11 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: Tian, L. et al. 2013.  Prospects for novel deformation processed Al/Ca composite conductors for overhead high voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. Elec. Power Sys. Res. 105:105–114.

]]>Stage1.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Aluminum/Alkaline Earth Metal Composites and Method for ProducingUtilityUnited States8,647,53613/136,5998/4/20112/11/201411/28/20315/24/201711/13/2017FalseMaterial to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganisms and Microalgaehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19422Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that provides an economical and efficient process to harvest microorganisms such as microalgae from growth media.

Description:
The interest in using algae as feedstock for biofuel production has steadily increased in recent years. In addition to biofuel applications, algae also provide valuable materials for the nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and food industries. However, methods to obtain concentrated volumes of algae from growth media are expensive, energy intensive and inefficient.  To overcome these drawbacks, researchers at Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory have developed a material for easy separation of microorganisms from the media; the material and growth medium may also be reused after the microorganisms have been recovered. The material provides benefits and advantages over other currently known methods concentrating microalgae and other microorganisms by avoiding the addition of soluble chemicals which have the potential to interfere with sequestration, the high energy demand of filtration methods, and inefficient recovery through the loss of flocculation compounds.

Advantage:
• High yields of microorganisms/microalgae
• Re-use of material for continuous microorganism harvest
• Simple and fast microorganism removal
• No impact on growth media

Application:
Sequestration of microorganisms from growth media for use in biofuel production, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and the food industry

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:17 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194223784Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:10 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Samples are available for testing.Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Magnetic Mesoporous Material for the Sequestration of AlgaeUtilityUnited States8,828,70513/300,34311/18/20119/9/20142/5/20325/14/20152/21/2018FalseLow Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide Superconductorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19421Description:
Superconductors are materials which carry electrical current without dissipation. However, feeding electrical current into a superconductor generates heat dissipation in the contacts and degrades maximum attainable current value. The degradation in contacts is also different depending on the different chemical nature of the superconducting materials. Iron-pnictide based superconductors have a number of superior properties as compared to other known high temperature superconductors, and due to their high critical magnetic fields, can be competitive alternatives for generating high magnetic fields without loss of resistance.  In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

Advantage:
• Effective (provides low contact surface resistivity of 10-9 W.cm2)
• Economical (utilizes current solder methods with an economical material

Application:
Electrical contact material for superconductors based on iron-pnictides

References:
Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Samples are available for testing, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners for this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194213707Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:09 GMTDescription:In order to take advantage of these properties, Iowa State University and Ames laboratory researchers have discovered a contact material and developed a method for its application which provides the necessary low electrical resistivity for iron-pcnitide superconductors. This new technology is easily adaptable to current solder methods used for creating electrical contacts and has the advantage of being very economical.

]]>Advantage:10-9 W.cm2)]]>Application:

]]>References:Tanatar, M. A., N. Ni, S.L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, and R. Prozorov. 2010.  Field-dependent transport critical current in single crystals of Ba(Fe1 − xTMx)2As2 (TM = Co, Ni) superconductors. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23:054002]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnictide SuperconductorsUtilityUnited States8,450,24612/931,9992/15/20115/28/20132/15/20315/14/201511/13/2017FalseProcess for Fabrication of Efficient Solar Cellshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19420Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for fabrication of solar cells with increased efficiency.

Description:
Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight.  However, the efficiency of organic solar cells is about 4-6%, and increasing this efficiency is critical for developing practical applications and commercially viable devices.  One approach to increasing efficiency is to increase the light absorption on the organic film without increasing the thickness of the photoactive layer, and various light management techniques have been tried for enhancing optical absorption, such as collection mirrors, patterned substrates and microprism substrates.  However, these approaches require extra processing steps or technically challenging coating technologies.  To overcome these limitations, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for conformal coating of polymer photovoltaic layers on microtextured substrates for increased light trapping.  The light management architecture of these solar cells enables a high degree of light absorption in even very thin photoactive films and leads to improved power conversion efficiency.

Advantage:
• Efficient (improves light absorption and power conversion)
• Economical (can be fabricated using low-cost and scalable soft lithography techniques)

Application:
Photovoltaics

References:
1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A 20% increase in efficiency has been observed experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Thu, 14 May 2015 14:53:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/194203677Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:07 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Design of Light-trapping Microscale-textured Surface for Efficient Organic Solar Cells," Nalwa, K. S. and S. Chaudhary,” 2010, Optics Express 18:5168-5178.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Textured Micrometer Scale Templates as Light Managing Fabrication Platform for Organic Solar CellsUtilityUnited States9,401,44213/223,3519/1/20117/26/201610/17/20338/15/201611/13/2017FalseBoride-Rich Boron Material for Neutron Detectionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19255Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a material that can be used to detect nuclear substances

Description:
Neutrons are produced by fission of nuclear materials or by naturally occurring radioactive decay.  Detection of neutrons, for example at transportation hubs, in shipping containers, or in luggage, may indicate the presence of smuggled nuclear material or even hidden nuclear weapons.  However, neutrons are difficult to detect because they lack a charge and conventional neutron detectors require large gas-filled chambers and high voltages.  Efforts to miniaturize neutron detectors through the development of new materials have suffered from drawbacks that include low sensitivity, susceptibility to radiation damage, and lattice strain.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a boride-rich boron material that has utility for neutron detection.  This icosahedral boride semiconducting material has a higher volumetric density of boron atoms than other boride-based neutron detecting materials, can be made an n-type semiconducting material—enabling all boride n-p junctions—and is homogeneous.  In addition, the material can be applied as an amorphous material, with potentially better resistance to radiation damage, as well as a crystalline film.  Since the material can be manufactured using sputtering or pulsed laser deposition, it may thus enable the development of practical and inexpensive neutron detectors with potentially great value in homeland security, industrial safety, and other applications. 

Advantage:
• Effective (the material shows relatively high carrier mobility, even in an amorphous form)

• Flexible (can be applied as amorphous material or crystalline film)

• Safer and more environmentally friendly (can be produced using pulsed laser deposition which does not require the use of toxic gases needed for chemical vapor deposition or other production methods)
• Robust (the material shows less lattice strain for growth on silicon than other boron-based materials)

Application:
Neutron Sensing for Homeland Security and Other Applications

References:
“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Thu, 07 May 2015 10:01:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192553277Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:27 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:
]]>

]]>
Application:

]]>References:“Electrical Transport in Amorphous Semiconducting AlMgB14 Films”, Y. Tian, G. Li, J. Shinar, N.L. Wang, B.A. Cook, J.W. Anderegg, A. P. Constant, A.M. Russell, and J. E. Snyder, 2004, App. Phys. Lett. 85:1181-1183.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740AlMgB14 and Related Icosahedral Boride Semiconducting Materials for Neutron Sensing ApplicationsUtilityUnited States7,375,34311/422,6296/7/20065/20/200811/9/20255/7/201511/13/2017FalseDual-Color Auto-Calibration Scanning-Angle Evanescent Field Microscopehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19664Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new microscope that can be used for live cell imaging as well as for examining single molecule dynamics.

Description:
Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is a mode of fluorescence microscopy that has been widely used for live-cell imaging at the interface between a biological sample and a cover slip or tissue culture well.  TIRFM is based on the induction of an evanescent wave in the liquid adjacent to the interface, which is created when reflected light penetrates the interface, propagates parallel to the surface of the plane of incidence, and decays exponentially with distance.  There are two basic TIRFM systems: prism-based and objective based.  Prism-based systems are preferable since they have lower costs, wider range of incident angles, less excitation light scattering, and higher accuracy in the incident angle determination.  However, the prism-based method has geographical constraints on sample manipulation–it is difficult to recalibrate the system manually for all incident angles–and because image reconstruction can be difficult.   To overcome these drawbacks, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed an innovative dual-color auto-calibration scanning-angle evanescent field microscope that is easier to operate and more reproducible than existing approaches.  This microscope has utility for live-cell imaging to examine cellular organization and dynamic processes that occur in the  cell/ substrate contact regions.  A computer-controlled automatic high-precision calibration procedure is used to find the incident angles in the full range, and this microscope is able to achieve better axial resolution than currently available systems.

Advantage:
• Permits high axial resolution (5-10 nm)
• Provides quick and automatic creation of an evanescent field for any incident angle in the full range
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Enables dual-color auto-calibration and scanning capability
• Allows rapid re-calibration of new samples
• Enables fine adjustment of the optical trapping forces created by the evanescent field

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The new microscope with an automatic high-precision calibration procedure has been tested under laboratory conditions and is available for demonstration. The entire auto calibration procedure was demonstrated to be complete within minutes and incident angles in the full range (from subcritical angles to nearly 90º) with intervals as small as 0.02º were identified.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196643750Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Auto-calibrated Scanning-angle Prism-type Total Internal Reflection Microscopy for Nanometer-precision Axial Position Determination and Optional Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo Total Internal Reflection MicroscopyUtilityUnited States9,012,87213/006,7391/14/20114/21/201512/25/20316/1/20157/23/2018FalseCatalyst for Selective Acid Transesterficationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19192Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory are looking for industry partners to commercialize a newly developed bi-functional, heterogeneous catalyst that is designed to expel aqueous byproducts formed during transesterfications reactions.

Description:
The ability to separate functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for recycling has enabled applications of these materials as heterogeneous catalysts in many chemical transformations. However, their sensitivity to hydrolysis and subsequent loss of catalytic performance has reduced the economic benefit potential of MSN catalysts. To address this drawback, Iowa  State  University  and  Ames  Laboratory  researchers  have  developed  an  efficient bifunctional MSN catalyst for esterification reactions. Superior reactivity has been achieved using this catalyst by supplementing the catalytic groups with secondary functionality designed to expel the resulting aqueous by-products, thereby preventing hydrolysis of the silica surface and plugging of the nano-environment. The principle employed in the architecture of this new catalyst makes it suitable for reactions involving dehydration and yields compounds of high purity.

Advantage:
• Robust structure enables multiple recycling
• High purity yields are achieved by efficiently expelling by-products of reaction
• Enhanced reactivity compared to existing commercial catalysts

Application:
acid transesterfication, dehydration reaction

Stage0.png
Development Stage:


Lab trials have been successful

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]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191923881Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:06 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:acid transesterfication, dehydration reactionStage0.png

]]>Lab trials have been successfulDesc3881.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica CatalystUtilityUnited States8,993,79313/361,6131/30/20123/31/20153/10/20335/7/20159/19/2018FalseSorbent Assisted Catalyst for the One-Pot Sequestration and Conversion of Renewable Feedstocks into Fuelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19129Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a technology that provides a simplified and economical production of hydrocarbon fuel from renewable resources with higher energy potential compared to ethanol or biodiesel. The ability to achieve higher yields from lipid feedstock, and in particular algae oils, by not utilizing current methods of fatty acid conversion to methyl esters, makes this technology economically attractive. Iowa State University is looking for industry partners to commercialize this technology.

Description:
Conversion of fatty acids to biodiesel has enabled energy properties comparable to conventional fuel sources derived from petroleum products.  However, the use of strong alkali catalysts and elimination of the glycerol waste component from the lipid conversion process reduces the yields obtained from the renewable feedstock. Separation of lipids from various sources such as algae has also presented a significant obstacle to the commercial viability of biorenewable fuels.  In order to achieve the conversion yield of complex, lipid feedstock mixtures comparable to conventional hydrocarbon fuels, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a catalyst system that enables selective adsorption and catalytic conversion of the targeted lipids into hydrocarbons.  The catalyst design enables the production of gasoline or diesel fuels that is chemically equivalent to that derived from petrochemicals without generating a glycerol byproduct.

Advantage:
• Complete conversion of lipids into hydrocarbon fuel
• Economical process
• Catalyst can be recycled

Application:
Fuel Production from Biorenewable Lipid Feedstocks

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
Treatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

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]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191294075Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngTreatment of microalgal oil with the catalyst system has been shown to have high conversion rates of free fatty acids to liquid hydrocarbons. Samples are available and ready for testing.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Adsorbent Catalytic Nanoparticles and Methods of Using the SameUtilityUnited States9,556,08813/691,18111/30/20121/31/20178/3/20351/31/201711/13/2017Catalysts and Methods of Using the SameCIPUnited States9,567,26514/015,2068/30/20132/14/20172/4/20342/16/201711/13/2017FalseDispersion Management with Metamaterialshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19668Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

Description:
Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings
• Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable
• Offers customizability and a small footprint

Application:
Telecommunications

References:
1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

A proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196684091Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:45 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed new method for dispersion compensation in telecommunication systems using metamaterials.

]]>Description:Dispersion management is a critical part of optical communication systems since the accumulation of dispersive effects due to propagation in a glass fiber results in limits on the distance data can travel as well as the rate of data transfer.  Approaches for dispersion compensation include the use of specialty fibers, which can require long lengths, and Bragg gratings, which can suffer from insertion loss.  To address the need for improved strategies for dispersion management, ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a new method for dispersion compensation using metamaterials that exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency.  This approach counteracts group velocity dispersion without the need for specialty fiber or Bragg gratings.  In addition, these phase-engineered materials are customizable and compact.

]]>Advantage:Eliminates the need for Bragg gratings ]]>Eliminates the need for long pieces of specialty fiber optic cable ]]>Offers customizability and a small footprint]]>Application:Telecommunications

]]>References:1: Dastmalchi, B. et al. 2014. Strong group-velocity dispersion compensation with phase-engineered sheet metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 89: 115123.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngA proof-of-concept a dispersion-compensation system using phase-engineered metamaterials has been demonstrated experimentally, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Dispersion Management with MetamaterialsUtilityUnited States9,588,25514/494,1749/23/20143/7/201711/21/20346/21/20172/26/2018FalseImproved Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ Passivationhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19666Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

Description:
Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

Advantage:
• Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.
• Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.

Application:
Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

References:
“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:48:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196663993Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:42 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process to passivate magnesium powders through the creation of a protective film

]]>Description:Passivation of magnesium using fluorine-containing gases is well known and extensively used in the die casting industry, and a single-step process to create a thin shell containing fluorine is the subject of previous Ames Laboratory patent.  This newest invention describes a process in which fluorine-containing gases are introduced into the atomizer spray chamber following a first reactive species, resulting in a oxy-fluorine rich scale on the surface of the magnesium powder during free-fall of the powders.  Powders produced in this way show reduced flammability versus commercial compositions (ignition temperature of 635°C versus 525°C).

]]>Advantage:Increased ductility of film yields better protection than native oxide film.]]>Significantly increased onset temperature for ignition reduces flammability hazard during production, handling, transport and storage.]]>Application:Passivated magnesium powders for improved safety

]]>References:“Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders”, A. Steinmetz, MS Thesis, Iowa State University, 2011.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Stability of Gas Atomized Reactive Powders Through Multiple Step In-Situ PassivationUtilityUnited States9,650,30913/986,1934/10/20135/16/20177/13/20346/21/201711/13/2017FalseNanotwinned Silver Alloy Films with Controlled Architectureshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19677Summary:
Researchers working at the Ames Laboratory have developed a sputtering technique to readily synthesize silver alloy film architectures in which the nanostructure can be readily designed over a single substrate in order to tailor the mechanical properties of the film.

Description:
Nanotwinned (nt) metals exhibit high strengths, but unlike their nanocrystalline counterparts, nt metals can also exhibit large uniform tensile ductility. Strength and ductility in nt metals are both strongly dependent on the structure.  Ames Laboratory researchers have recently developed a sputtering technique that enables the synthesis of films made of nt silver alloys in which the processing conditions can be used to control the nanostructure architecture; designing specific structures, the plasticity mechanisms that also control the bulk mechanical response can also be varied. As a consequence, films with thicknesses ranging from nanometer to greater than hundreds of microns that combine very high tensile strengths (> 500 MPa) with excellent electrical conductivities that are comparable to pure, coarse grained silver.  This technology may have utility for commercial applications in electronics—for example in the interconnects for flexible displays, where high strength is needed to prevent premature due to repeated mechanical loading along with high conductivity.

Advantage:
• Enables creation of silver alloy films of varying thickness that have very high strength and high conductivity
• Allows mechanical properties of the film to be tailored

Application:
 thin film coatings, electronic displays

References:
Ott, R. T. et al. 2013. Tailoring the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals through structural design. Proceedings of Materials Science & Technology Conference, Montreal, Canada

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png
A continuous silver film on a six inch substrate has been deposited, allowing for structures and properties to be tailored to the substrate in a single deposition run.

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:49 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196774108Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Enables creation of silver alloy films of varying thickness that have very high strength and high conductivity]]>Allows mechanical properties of the film to be tailored]]>Application:

]]>References:Ott, R. T. et al. 2013. Tailoring the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned metals through structural design. Proceedings of Materials Science & Technology Conference, Montreal, Canada

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740Materials| Ames LaboratoryFalseSolvent-free Mechanochemical Synthesis of Alane (AlH3) at Room Temperaturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19676Summary:
Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the synthesis of alane with quantitative yields at ambient temperature and moderate hydrogen or ambient gas pressure while controlling side reactions

Description:
Alane exceeds the DOE performance criteria for hydrogen storage for transportation vehicles, but does not have a cost-efficient production route. Synthesis of alane by metathesis reactions in organic solvents is inefficient because of the need to remove solvents from the resultant alane solvates that inevitably leads to thermal decomposition of a substantial fraction of the formed alane.  Traditional mechanochemical synthetic routes require cryogenic processing to control side reactions leading to decomposition of more than 60% of the formed alane.  This new method allows for the use of a mechanochemical process at ambient temperatures and slightly elevated hydrogen or inert gas pressures to produce alane while still suppressing side reactions to produce alane in quantitative yields.  By eliminating the desolvation step inherent in the solvent-based route and the cryogenic environment of traditional mechanochemical synthesis, this novel synthesis route significantly increases yields and reduces the production costs for this compound.

Advantage:
• Control of side reactions without cryogenic processing
• No hazardous solvents or expensive separation and purification steps
• Fast reactions with nearly quantitative yields

Application:
Solid state hydrogen storage for fuel cell and other applications.

References:
1: “Dry mechanochemical synthesis of alane from LiH and AlCl3”, I.Z. Hlova et al., 2014, Faraday Discussions DOI: 10.1039/c3fd00161j.

2: “Solvent-free mechanochemical synthesis of alane, AlH3: effect of pressure on the reaction pathway”,” S. Gupta et al., 2014, Green Chemistry 16: 4378-4388.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

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]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196764196Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:30 GMTSummary:Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a process for the synthesis of alane with quantitative yields at ambient temperature and moderate hydrogen or ambient gas pressure while controlling side reactions

]]>Description:Alane exceeds the DOE performance criteria for hydrogen storage for transportation vehicles, but does not have a cost-efficient production route. Synthesis of alane by metathesis reactions in organic solvents is inefficient because of the need to remove solvents from the resultant alane solvates that inevitably leads to thermal decomposition of a substantial fraction of the formed alane.  Traditional mechanochemical synthetic routes require cryogenic processing to control side reactions leading to decomposition of more than 60% of the formed alane.  This new method allows for the use of a mechanochemical process at ambient temperatures and slightly elevated hydrogen or inert gas pressures to produce alane while still suppressing side reactions to produce alane in quantitative yields.  By eliminating the desolvation step inherent in the solvent-based route and the cryogenic environment of traditional mechanochemical synthesis, this novel synthesis route significantly increases yields and reduces the production costs for this compound.

]]>Advantage:Control of side reactions without cryogenic processing]]>No hazardous solvents or expensive separation and purification steps]]>Fast reactions with nearly quantitative yields]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “Dry mechanochemical synthesis of alane from LiH and AlCl3”, I.Z. Hlova et al., 2014, Faraday Discussions DOI: 10.1039/c3fd00161j.

2: “Solvent-free mechanochemical synthesis of alane, AlH3: effect of pressure on the reaction pathway”,” S. Gupta et al., 2014, Green Chemistry 16: 4378-4388.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740False