Latest technologies from Iowa State Universityhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.comBe the first to know about the latest inventions and technologies available from Iowa State Universityen-USThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:30:24 GMTThu, 23 Nov 2017 06:30:24 GMThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rsssupport@inteum.comCopyright 2017, Iowa State UniversityPotato tuber yield enhancementhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25635Summary:
Inhibition of two potato genes can be used to produce plants with greater tuber yields without affecting plant growth.

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Description:
Researchers from Iowa State University and the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research have jointly demonstrated increased tuber yields in potato by inhibiting the potato genes StBEL11 and StBEL29.
Potato BEL1-like genes encode transcription factors that work in tandem with KNOTTED1-types to regulate the expression of many genes. Potato StBEL5 functions as a long-distance mRNA signal that is transcribed in leaves and moves into roots and stolons to stimulate growth. StBEL11 and StBEL29 are most closely related to StBEL5, and like StBel5 function as mobile RNAs.  However, over-expression of StBEL11 and StBEL29 produces plants with suppressed tuberization, in contrast to StBel5 which enhances tuberization. RNA suppression lines of StBEL11 and StBEL29 exhibit enhanced overall tuber yield with no effect on shoot growth. Thus, RNA suppression of StBEL11 and StBEL29 can be used to produce plants with greater overall tuber yields without affecting overall plant growth.

Advantage:
• Increased yield.
• Demonstrated inhibition using RNA suppresion
• Potential for inhibition by gene editing
• RNAi technology already in use commercially for potatoes

Application:
Potato Crop Improvement

References:
1. The Mobile RNAs, StBEL11 and StBEL29, Suppress Growth of Tubers in Potato.  Plant Mol Biol. 2017 Apr;93(6):563-578. doi: 10.1007/s11103-016-0582-4. Epub 2017 Jan 13.  Ghate TH,  Sharma P,  Kondhare KR,  Hannapel DJ and Banerjee AK.

2. Review: Multiple Mobile mRNAs Signals Regulate Tuber Development in Potato Plants (Basel). 2017 Feb 10;6(1). pii: E8. doi: 10.3390/plants6010008. David H. Hannapel and Anjan K. Banerjee

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for


Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3056: Enhanced Plant Growth through Mobile RNA Signals

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Wed, 12 Jul 2017 14:39:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/256354587Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:30 GMTSummary:

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]]>Description:Potato BEL1-like genes encode transcription factors that work in tandem with KNOTTED1-types to regulate the expression of many genes. Potato StBEL5 functions as a long-distance mRNA signal that is transcribed in leaves and moves into roots and stolons to stimulate growth. StBEL11 and StBEL29 are most closely related to StBEL5, and like StBel5 function as mobile RNAs.  However, over-expression of StBEL11 and StBEL29 produces plants with suppressed tuberization, in contrast to StBel5 which enhances tuberization. RNA suppression lines of StBEL11 and StBEL29 exhibit enhanced overall tuber yield with no effect on shoot growth. Thus, RNA suppression of StBEL11 and StBEL29 can be used to produce plants with greater overall tuber yields without affecting overall plant growth.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. The Mobile RNAs, StBEL11 and StBEL29, Suppress Growth of Tubers in Potato.  Plant Mol Biol. 2017 Apr;93(6):563-578. doi: 10.1007/s11103-016-0582-4. Epub 2017 Jan 13.  Ghate TH,  Sharma P,  Kondhare KR,  Hannapel DJ and Banerjee AK.

2. Review: Multiple Mobile mRNAs Signals Regulate Tuber Development in Potato Plants (Basel). 2017 Feb 10;6(1). pii: E8. doi: 10.3390/plants6010008. David H. Hannapel and Anjan K. Banerjee]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 3056: Enhanced Plant Growth through Mobile RNA Signals

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseGene controlling spontaneous haploid genome doubling in maizehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25528Summary:
A specific mutation in a maize gene is associated with enhanced spontaneous haploid genome doubling.

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Description:
To produce commercial hybrid maize one inbred corn line is crossed with a different inbred line. Using traditional breeding, it takes 5 to 8 generations to develop one inbred line. Doubled haploid (DH) technology typically produces inbred corn lines in a couple of generations, since the offspring contain only a single genome instead of two.  Inducer lines are used as pollinators in the DH approach.  DH has been widely adopted by maize breeders.  Artificial haploid genome doubling, which commonly involves toxic and costly chemicals, is a major challenge in the DH process. ISU researchers have identified a a specific mutational change in maize which is associated with the spontaneous haploid doubling effect. This discovery opens the way for the rapid introduction of the mutation in elite germplasm by either marker assisted breeding or gene editing.

Advantage:
• Mutation that is easily transferable
• Avoidance of costly toxic chemical to double haploid genomes

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:18:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/255284636Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:20 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseUse of the XA1 rice gene to confer broad Xanthomonas resistance in plantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25527Summary:
The Xa1 gene induces resistance to all or nearly all TAL effectors in certain crops thus providing with a new approach to combat most crop diseases induced by Xanthomonas.

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Description:
By unmasking the suppressive function of bacterial pseudogenes, the researchers discovered hat Xa1, an NBS-LRR type disease resistance gene in rice, can recognize all test TAL effector genes and confer disease resistance to those pathogenic bacteria that contain such TALE effector genes. Several crop diseases, such as wheat blight, citrus canker, cotton blight, etc. are caused by Xanthomonas bacteria that harbor multiple copies of TAL effector genes but not suppressor pseudogene. Therefore, Xa1 and its derivatives can be used as broad spectrum disease-resistance genes.

Advantage:
• Native rice gene.
• Wheat plants available for evaluation.
• Predicted broad resistance to Xanthomonas in most plants.

References:
Interfering TAL effectors of Xanthomonas oryzae neutralize R-gene-mediated plant disease resistance (2016) Ji et al. Nature Communications 7, Article number: 13435 (2016)

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:12:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/255274460Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:20 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:

]]>References:Interfering TAL effectors of Xanthomonas oryzae neutralize R-gene-mediated plant disease resistance (2016) Ji et al. Nature Communications 7, Article number: 13435 (2016)

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseTransparent soil made by gel beadshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/25370Summary:
This innovation appears to be the first description of using beads made with “natural” gelling materials to observe plant roots. The bead formulation is novel and optimized for plant growth.

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Description:
ISU researchers reported their invention to be a transparent soil medium which can provide a heterogeneous environment with aeration and porous condition for plants. The medium is composed of commonly used gels and is transparent in a basal medium solution. The transparent soil composition is controllable, affordable, and require simple processing protocols. Brassica rapa grown in transparent soil shows root phenotypes resembling those of pure soils, as opposed to the phenotypes observed with homogeneous gels.

Advantage:
• Shelf life
• Aeration by using beads
• Potential for near infrared root imaging (no need for visible light)
• Easy to prepare

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]]>Wed, 24 May 2017 13:57:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/253704601Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:26:05 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseCampylobacter jejuni peptide for vaccine developmenthttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23910Summary:
A promising target for designing a diagnostic test and peptide sequence for vaccine development to control Campylobacter jejuni infections in ruminants and humans.

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Description:
Campylobacter jejuni is a major causative agent for abortion in ruminants, particularly in sheep. It is also a major foodborne pathogen and a leading cause of enteritis in humans, responsible for 400-500 million cases of diarrhea annually worldwide each year. In the U.S. alone, C. jejuni accounts for more than 800,000 cases of foodborne illnesses each year. A hyper virulent clone of C. jejuni is the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the U.S. This disclosure identifies a peptide (AEEQGADLLGKSTISTTQKAAPFQADSLGNL) in the predicted external loop 4 of the major outer membrane protein of C. jejuni, which is essential for its hyper-virulence in inducing abortion. The loop 4 sequence is critical for virulence and provides a promising target for designing a diagnostic test and for vaccine development to control C. jejuni infections.

Advantage:
• Subunit vaccine
• Highly specific target
• No need to culture the pathogen

References:
1. September 6, 2016. Journal Article. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni /PNAS USA

2. Sahin et al. Emergence of a tetracycline resistant campylobacter jejuni clone associated with outbreaks of ovine abortion in the United States. J. Clin. Microbiol. May 2008 p. 1663-1671

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:58:24 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/239104559Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:41 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:

]]>References:1. September 6, 2016. Journal Article. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni /PNAS USA

2. Sahin et al. Emergence of a tetracycline resistant campylobacter jejuni clone associated with outbreaks of ovine abortion in the United States. J. Clin. Microbiol. May 2008 p. 1663-1671 ]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseInduction Protocol for Bovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions Using a Cocktail of Pure Growth Organismshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23907Summary:
ISURF #4258 describes a method for inducing papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD) in cattle, an important disease for the US dairy industry that is leading cause of lameness.  Also disclosed are a number of bacterial isolates that are used to induce the disease model for this polymicrobial infection.  Advantages of this technology include lower cost, more faithful and consistent replication of lesions seen with the natural disease, and rapid disease induction.

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Description:
Digital dermatitis (DD) is an economically important polymicrobial disease process of dairy cattle that, despite 35 years of research, remains etiologically undefined. It is the leading cause of lameness in US dairy cattle. In addition to the cost associated with treatment and lost production, it represents a significant welfare concern for the industiy. For these reasons, lameness, and specifically DD, was ranked as the top priority by Daily Industry Stakeholders at the 2010 USDA ARS-NIFA Anitnal Health Research Planning Workshop. Although the disease  is responsive to antibiotics, a definitive bacterial cause has not been identified. Treponema spp. are regularly isolated from DD lesions, however attempts to induce classic disease lesions with pure culture of these microorganisms remain universally unsuccessful. Based on these findings, and the lack of efficacy of Treponema based vaccines, it is widely believed that the disease is polybacterial in nature. The identity of microorganisms that work in concert with Treponema spp. to cause the clinical presentation of DD in cattle has remained unknown. Lack of this knowledge is an inportant problem because it prevents the development of effective intervention strategies that target the causative agents of DD. One important tool for studying this disease process is the development of a consistent model of disease induction that results in lesions characteristic of the naturally occurring lesions. Such a model will allow for indepth study of the disease pathogenesis, experimental studies to try and fulfill identification of causative organisms and most importantly a model useful for testing experimental interventions (vaccines, treatments, prevention etc). This disclosure describes a novel induction method useful for inducing digital dermatitis lesions that appear consistent with the natural disease process. Furthermore, this method results in reasonably quick induction in the characteristic site of lesion development. Previous induction methods that have been attempted either do not provide consistent results or induce lesions that are not consistent with natural disease.

Advantage:
• Lesions consistent with the natural disease process
• Availability of isolates
• Potential for marked improvement vs. current approaches

Application:
Veterinary Research

References:
Animal Model Protocol, Diagnostic, Therapeutic And Vaccine Against Digital Dermatitis, US 2016/0256575


 

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:17:47 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/239074258Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:40 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:

]]>References:Animal Model Protocol, Diagnostic, Therapeutic And Vaccine Against Digital Dermatitis, US 2016/0256575

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseInsect toxin delivery mediated by a densovirus coat proteinhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23906Summary:
A Junonia coenia densovirus coat protein with potential to create fusion proteins expressed in transgenic crops to control the fall armyworm.

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Description:
The fall armyworm is a continuous resident of the Gulf States. Corn, sorghum, and other plants of the grass family are its preferred foods, but the fall armyworm also attacks alfalfa, bean, peanut, potato, sweet potato, turnip, spinach, tomato, cabbage, cucumber, cotton, tobacco, all grain crops, and clover. Each year the fall armyworm can be found as far north as Montana, Michigan, and New Hampshire. In the southeast it occurs annually on late corn.

In this disclosure, ISU researchers report a discovery that may be exploited to develop a technology to control the armyworm without using chemical insecticides. The finding is that the VP4 coat protein from the Junonia coenia Densovirus rapidly crosses the midgut epithelium of this insect. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop effective insecticidal VP4/toxin fusion proteins capable to kill the worm by ingestion of the toxic proteins produced endogenously in a biotech crop.

Advantage:
• Possible alternative to chemical insecticides
• Likely not to disrupt non-plant eating insects
• Potential for high specificity
Application:
Pest control in plant agriculture.

References:
Delivery of intrahemocoelic peptides for insect pest management. (Review)
Bryony C. Bonning and Nanasaheb P. Chougule
Trends in Biotechnology Vol 32 (2) 91-98 (2014)

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:10:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/239064563Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:39 GMTSummary:

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In this disclosure, ISU researchers report a discovery that may be exploited to develop a technology to control the armyworm without using chemical insecticides. The finding is that the VP4 coat protein from the Junonia coenia Densovirus rapidly crosses the midgut epithelium of this insect. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop effective insecticidal VP4/toxin fusion proteins capable to kill the worm by ingestion of the toxic proteins produced endogenously in a biotech crop.]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Delivery of intrahemocoelic peptides for insect pest management. (Review)
Bryony C. Bonning and Nanasaheb P. Chougule
Trends in Biotechnology Vol 32 (2) 91-98 (2014)

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]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseNano-patterning Methods Including: (1) Patterning of Nanophotonic Structures at Optical Fiber Tip For Refractive Index Sensing and (2) Plasmonic Crystal Incorporating Graphene Oxide for Detection of Gaseous/Aqueous compoundshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23693Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a process that relates to nano-patterning at the tip of an optic fiber for waveguide and remote sensing functionalities.  The invention includes techniques of nanopatterning that can be less complex as well as high resolution and rapid. Using these developments, researchers have created a new sensor built on a plasmonic crystal structure coated with graphene oxide (GO)---Other gas/liquid specific coatings can be supported.  The sensor allows selective detection of different species in gaseous/aqueous form through the tuning of the refractive index via the design of the nanostructure, and its modulation under exposure to varying concentrations of species.

Description:
The ability of creating high-resolution nanopatterns on the tip of optical fiber has a great potential to open up many possibilities of realizing applications involving remote sensing based on optical refractive index modulation with different detection devices such as diffraction gratings, photonic crystals, and nanophotonic resonators.  This invention is a simple and efficient method to inscribe high-resolution nanophotonic patterns on the cleaved facets of optical fibers using UV assisted nanoimprinting lithography.  Using this innovative process, researchers at ISU have developed a new sensor built on a plasmonic crystal structure coated with GO---Other gas/liquid specific coatings can be supported.  The sensor allows selective detection of different species through the tuning of the refractive index via the design of the nanostructure, and its modulation under exposure to varying concentrations of the species.

Advantage:
• A simplified and efficient process to fabricate nanopatterns on optical fiber tip
• Utilization of the guided mode resonance (GMR) structure to monitor surrounding refractive index changes
• Allows selective detection of different species in gaseous/aqueous form with subtle variations in concentratio
• Selective coating used for to allow surface binding and refractive index modulatio
• Validated by the Principle Component Analysis based pattern recognition algorithm
• Demonstration that graphene oxide coated plasmonic design provides both sensitivity and specificity to gas species

Application:
Agriculture, environmental and health monitoring

References:
Microfluidic impedimetric sensor for soil nitrate detection using graphene oxide and conductive nanofibers enabled sensing interface, Kumar, et. al., September 22, 2016

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 13 Dec 2016 12:09:55 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/236934453Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:18 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Microfluidic impedimetric sensor for soil nitrate detection using graphene oxide and conductive nanofibers enabled sensing interface, Kumar, et. al., September 22, 2016

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrophoretic Soil Nutrient Sensor for Agriculturehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23550Summary:
ISU researchers have developed an in situ, electrophoresis based microfluidics ion nutrient sensor for the detection of anions in a soil solution extracted from the soil.  The sensors offers a new capability to analyze concentrations of various anions as well as cations, in automated extracted soil solutions with both high specificity and sensitivity. It includes the microfluidics for the automated extraction of soil solution.

Description:
Demands for on-site, in situ, real-time sensing exists for site-specific nutrient management in agriculture, where 30-40% of applied nutrients are wasted due to a lack of knowledge of site-specific plant needs, and those nutrients act as pollutants to waterways and the atmosphere.  This sensing system developed at ISU integrates a microfluidics device for sample intake and filtration, excitation source for generation of an electric potential, electrophoresis microchip for ion separation and readout mechanism to wirelessly transmit data.

Advantage:
• In situ electrophoresis based label-free inorganic ion sensor for detecting soil nutrient components
• Automatic sample collection and preparation
• Rapid measurement and read out to users and operators via wireless interface
• Can be utilized to inform a subsequent action, such as controlling a variable rate applicator
• Technology can be adopted for other applications as environmental/health/food monitoring

Application:
Precision agriculture or environmental monitoring where nutrient sensing is require

References:
Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:57:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/235504454Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:15 GMTSummary:

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]]>References:Z. Xu, X. Wang, R. J. Weber, R. Kumar, and L. Dong, “Microfluidic Electrophoretic Ion Nutrient Sensor”, 2016 IEEE Sensors Conference, Orlando, FL, Oct. 2016.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMaking paraffin-like coating materials from soybean oilhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/23520Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a paraffin wax substitute.

Description:
Corrugated cardboard coated in wax is a typical container for shipping many products.  The wax coating offers water repellence and some chemical resistance that cardboard boxes alone don’t offer. The wax for these boxes are typically petroleum derived and not able to be repulped and recycled and are slow to degrade, causing a significant source of waste. With the price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, a biorenewable cost-effective, high performing wax is desirable. To meet this market need, ISU researchers have developed a new material derived from soybean oil with properties similar to paraffin wax.

Advantage:
• Obtained from natural and renewable sources
• Comparable melting point, hydrophobicity, and hardness to paraffin wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngMarkJuettenAssociate Commercialization Manager, Chemistrymjuetten@iastate.eduFalseIdentification of Bt toxins to target Asian Citrus Psyllid for HLB treatment in citrushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22825Summary:
ISU researchers have identified several Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for the management of Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) and the associated HLB disease in the citrus industry.

Description:
The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is an important pest of citrus in several countries. ACP can transmit bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which causes a devastating citrus disease called huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. The disease destroys citrus trees in many countries and states, including Florida. It is estimated that this insect-disease combination has cost the citrus industry in Florida $1.3 billion in losses. Currently, ACP management is mainly driven by chemical insecticide applications, but these are costly and insecticide resistance in ACP has been noted. It also has non-target impacts on beneficial insects including butterflies and honeybees. To address this problem, insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is adopted as an environmentally benign alternative to the application of chemical insecticides. ISU researchers screened multiple strains of Bt for toxicity against ACP and identified that 1) combinations of toxins derived from six strains of Bt are toxic to ACP. 2) Two individual toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1B derived from one of these strains are toxic to ACP. 3) Cry1Ab can be modified with four ACP gut-binding peptides to enhance toxicity against ACP. This method would provide a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach for management of ACP and the associated HLB disease than repeated application of broad-spectrum insecticides.

Advantage:
• An economic and efficient way for the management of ACP
• Ecofriendly and beneficial to the public health
• Have no detrimental impact on beneficial insects (e.g. honeybee)

Application:
Insect control

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Fri, 09 Sep 2016 12:13:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/228254477Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:25:03 GMTSummary:

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]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseA Novel Vegetable Oil-Based Material as Substitute for Carnauba Waxhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/22573Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a synthetic process to convert soybean oil into a new material with a high hardness comparable to that of palm-based carnauba wax and a much higher melting point.

Description:
In North America, the consumption of wax is around three billion pounds per year with an associated vale in excess of three billion dollars. Markets of waxes are diverse, ranging from simple fuel in candles to practical applications such as coating in the paper and packaging industry. The largest market of wax remains in the packaging area, which are mostly derived from petroleum-based paraffin waxes. However, because of the increasing price and limited resource of crude oil and growing concern about its impact on the environment, there is considerable interest for cost-effective, higher performing and naturally sourced alternatives like carnauba wax. To address this issue, ISU researchers developed a new material derived from soybean oil that has superior properties to petroleum paraffin wax with a high hardness, high melting point and good surface finish.

Advantage:
• Natural and renewable
• High hardness
• Higher melting point than carnauba wax
• Offer a new market channel for the utilization of soybean oil

Application:
Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles

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]]>Thu, 28 Jul 2016 12:19:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/225734482Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:53 GMTSummary:

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]]>Application:Coating in the paper and packaging area; Food additives; Candles]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalsePlant Protein and Biochar Fertilizerhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21701Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a new, bio-char-based fertilizer that solves the problem of biochar application and incorporated additional biorenewable components for soil conditioning and enhanced nutrient availability.

Description:
Consumer demands for environmentally friendly products continue to rise. Public concern over pollution and other negative environmental impacts from chemical production have created a great interest in alternative chemical products produced from bio-based feedstocks and end-use chemical products that incorporate both bio-based chemicals and green chemistry principles.

The technology involves the use of soy flour and biochar materials to form a bio-derived fertilizer with soil conditioner. Recent studies have demonstrated that biochar can retain fertilizing chemicals, enhance plant growth, improve cation exchange capacity, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions when used as a soil additive. Previous research by the inventors has shown that soy-based plastics can be compounded with biochar to serve as an effective fertilizer and soil conditioner. The soy protein provides nutritional effects and stabilizes the biochar material. Biochar is a fine, black powder that cannot be spread onto soil without the addition of a binder or carrier. It is not possible to dispense the fine biochar powder directly because the wind would carry the powder uncontrollably. We have shown that it is possible to use pellets produced from soy plastic and bio-char to disperse this bio-based fertilizer easily and effectively.

Advantage:
• Environmentally Friendly
• Less Expensive Feedstocks
• Efficient Without Synthetic Fertilizers
• Competitive Production Costs

Application:
Lawn and Garden Fertilizer

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:57:07 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/217014288Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:24:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The technology involves the use of soy flour and biochar materials to form a bio-derived fertilizer with soil conditioner. Recent studies have demonstrated that biochar can retain fertilizing chemicals, enhance plant growth, improve cation exchange capacity, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions when used as a soil additive. Previous research by the inventors has shown that soy-based plastics can be compounded with biochar to serve as an effective fertilizer and soil conditioner. The soy protein provides nutritional effects and stabilizes the biochar material. Biochar is a fine, black powder that cannot be spread onto soil without the addition of a binder or carrier. It is not possible to dispense the fine biochar powder directly because the wind would carry the powder uncontrollably. We have shown that it is possible to use pellets produced from soy plastic and bio-char to disperse this bio-based fertilizer easily and effectively.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMesoporous Carbon Nanospheres for the Continuous Production/Extraction of High Value Fatty Acids from Algaehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21348Description:
The technology involves the use of specialized mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCN) for the selective extraction of high value fatty acids produced by algae in culture. The process allows for the removal of the oil form the algae and the selective sequestration of the oils in the MCN and does not cause terminally detrimental effects to the algal cells therefore allowing the process to be continuous. Current methods for extraction involve drying, grinding and resuspension of the biomass which results in the destruction of the algal cells. The new technology allows for the selective sequestration of the algal oils in a manner that is non-toxic and far less expensive. Once sequestered, the fatty acids and oils can be removed from the MCN’s by simple washing and easily converted to high value products.

Advantage:
• Drastic cost reduction
• Non-toxic
• Fast and continuous
• Convertible to biofuels

Application:
Production of high value fatty acids and conversion to biofuels

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]]>Wed, 03 Feb 2016 10:53:00 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/213483617Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:51 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJackHartwigsenjackh1@iastate.eduAgriculture| MaterialsFalse<![CDATA[Foxtail Mosaic Virus Transient Gene Silencing Vector for Maize & other Monocots]]>http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21318Summary:
Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purpose of VIGS in monocotyledonous plants and only one has been shown to infect maize. ISU researchers have developed a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FMV) which is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FMV viral vector. Proof-of-concept VIGS applications of this vector system was accomplished by silencing two genes in the sweet corn line Golden Bantam. In addition, the research demonstrated that the FMV vector establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum, and green foxtail, indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomic studies in maize and other monocots.

Advantage:
• Monocot-specific vector
• Proven to work in Maize, Sorghum, and Green Foxtail
• Transient expression enables high-throughput

Application:
Agricultural Research

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:20:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/213184344Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:50 GMTSummary:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalsemiRNA396 as a Tool to Control Cyst Nematodeshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21075Summary:
The innovation is a molecular target to develop plants with enhanced resistance to nematodes.

Description:
ISU researchers have demonstrated that the miRNA396-GRF regulatory unit in the model plant Arabidopsis mediates parasitism by the sugar beet nematode. Furthermore, the data indicates that the miRNA396 represents a key regulator for the reprogramming of root cells representing a powerful molecular target for the animal. Since miRNA396 is highly conserved in plants, manipulation of its expression in  agronomic crops may also lead to enhanced resistance to nematodes.

Advantage:
• Molecular modification approach
• Potential utility in many crop species

Application:
Construction of transgenic or gene edited plants with enhanced resistance to nematodes

References:
1. The Arabidopsis MicroRNA396-GRF1/GRF3 Regulatory Module Acts as a Developmental Regulator in the Reprogramming of Root Cells during Cyst Nematode Infection1,[W][OA] Tarek Hewezi, Tom R. Maier, Dan Nettleton, and Thomas J. Baum*

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 14:16:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210753900Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:48 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:The Arabidopsis MicroRNA396-GRF1/GRF3 Regulatory Module Acts as a Developmental Regulator in the Reprogramming of Root Cells during Cyst Nematode Infection1,[W][OA] Tarek Hewezi, Tom R. Maier, Dan Nettleton, and Thomas J. Baum*

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseSoybean Genes for Enhanced Sudden Death Syndrome Resistancehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21060Summary:
Endogenous soybean genes with potential to yield soybean varieties with improved resistance to sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybeans.

Description:
ISU researchers have identified ten soybean genes with markedly reduced gene expression following infection by the fungus Fusarium virguliforme that causes sudden death syndrome in soybeans. The genes are being characterized for resistance to sudden death syndrome in transgenic soybeans and some of the genes look promising. If effective these findings may lead to the development of commercially important sudden death syndrome resistant soybean cultivars.

Advantage:
• Potential for enhanced resistance to soybean pathogens
• Widely accepted approach
• On of the genes shows multiple resistance to Fusarium, Aphids, and Mites

Application:
Plant breeding, Soybeans, Genetic engineering

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4276: Soybean SDS Nonhost Resistance Genes Pss6, Pss21 & Pss25 and ISURF 4277: Peptides to Neutralize FvTox1 Sudden Death Syndrome Toxin FvTox1 in Soybeans

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 07:58:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210604273Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:38 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF 4276: Soybean SDS Nonhost Resistance Genes Pss6, Pss21 & Pss25 and ISURF 4277: Peptides to Neutralize FvTox1 Sudden Death Syndrome Toxin FvTox1 in Soybeans

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalsePeptides to Neutralize FvTox1 Sudden Death Syndrome Toxin FvTox1 in Soybeanshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21059Summary:
Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-interacting synthetic peptide sequences for enhancing foliar sudden death syndrome resistance in soybean.

Description:
This innovation relates to the field of genetic engineering of soybeans. Novel FvTox1 binding peptides encoding nucleic acid molecules, as well as the proteins encoded by such nucleic acids are disclosed as well as methods of conferring tolerance to sudden death syndrome (SDS) and the development of genetically modified plant cells with improved tolerance to SDS. Expression of these synthetic peptides is predicted to reduce photorespiration and increase photosynthesis, thus leading to higher yields. Transgenic soybeans expressing the synthetic peptides are available for evaluation.

Advantage:
• Enhanced tolerance to SDS
• Proof-of-concept in plants
• Transgenic soybeans available for evaluation
• Potential for increased photosynthesis


Application:
Development of SDS resistant soybean varieties.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4273: Soybean Genes for Enhanced SDS Resistance and ISURF 4276: Soybean SDS Nonhost Resistance Genes Pss6, Pss21 & Pss25

References:
Wang B, Swaminathan S, Bhattacharyya MK (2015) Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean. PLoS ONE 10(12): e0145156. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0145156

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 07:58:25 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210594277Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 4273: Soybean Genes for Enhanced SDS Resistance and ISURF 4276: Soybean SDS Nonhost Resistance Genes Pss6, Pss21 & Pss25

]]>References:Wang B, Swaminathan S, Bhattacharyya MK (2015) Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean. PLoS ONE 10(12): e0145156. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0145156

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseStreptococcus suis Isolateshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21052Description:
Streptococcus Suis is a pig pathogen that occasionally infects humans. Iowa State University is making available for non-exclusive licensing four Streptococcus Suis isolates with potential for research use, diagnostics, and development of vaccines. Both viruses  [A/Swine/ISUVDL11/05 (H3N2-cluster III) and A/Swine/ISUVDL12/05 (reassortant H1N1)] represent 2005 swine influenza viruses contemporary isolates of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes that circulating in US swine populations at the time.

Advantage:
• Ready to use
• Adapted to growth in culture

Application:
Animal Health/ Vaccine Development/ Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:44:02 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210523342Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:31 GMTDescription:Advantage:Application:Animal Health/ Vaccine Development/ DiagnosticsIntellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalse
Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21051Summary:
The genetic basis of Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) in pigs and tests that can be used to identify SCID pigs and SCID carriers have been established

Description:
ISU researchers previously identified and documented, for the first time, the presence of SCID in pigs. Additional research on the experimental mutant pig line developed at ISU  enabled the identification of the genomic region harboring the causative mutation. The discovery  of the mutation allowed the development of genetic tests that can be used to identify SCID pigs and SCID carriers. The identification and understanding of the genetic basis for the SCID mutation will allow further characterization of the SCID phenotype for animal disease and biomedical research, including research into the immune system, cancer research, the effects of disease, cell and tissue transplantation, and for testing of new vaccines and therapeutic agents for immuno-compromised individuals. SCID pigs provide a much better animal model for such purposes than the widely used SCID mice and, thus, development of this model could potentially be extremely useful for advancing biomedical research and drug discovery . 

Advantage:
• Rapid ID of SCID pigs in litters for biomedical research
• Tool for  genetic surveillance of commercial pig lines

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 3992:  Immunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Research 

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Development Stage:

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Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:39:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210514044Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:31 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 3992:  Immunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Research 

]]>Stage3.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineGenetic Test and Genetic Basis for SCID in pigsUtilityUnited States9,745,56114/592,5861/8/20158/29/20172/17/20359/8/201711/20/2017FalsePyrolysis of extracted lignin in a continuous reactorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21049Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a pretreatment for extracted lignin that allows it to be effectively pyrolyzed.

Description:
Agricultural biomass is largely made up of three polymers: cellulose (made from C6 sugars), hemicellulose (predominantly C5 sugars), and lignin, consisting of substituted aromatic groups. As the second most abundant natural polymer on the planet, lignin has the potential to be a bio-renewable source for transportation fuels and specialties chemicals.  Attempts to utilize fast pyrolysis to depolymerize lignin to its monomer units have been hindered by its properties: lignin readily melts at temperatures below those used for pyrolysis, resulting in rapidly clogged reactor vessels.
Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple and cost effective pretreatment step which addresses the processability of lignin for fast pyrolysis. The treating consists of exposing the lignin to mono-and di-basic chemicals, including NaOH, LiOH, Mg(OH)2, and Ca(OH)2. This process binds the reactive groups, but does not depolymerize the lignin. Pretreatment with these chemicals allows for continuous operation of a fluidized bed pyrolyzer without clogging the reactor vessels.

Advantage:
• Treatment allows for continuous pyrolysis of lignin
• Cost effective

Application:
Biorenewable source for transportation fuels and chemicals

References:
S. Zhou et al., “The use of calcium hydroxide pretreatment to overcome agglomeration of technical lignin during fast pyrolysis”, Green Chemistry, 17, pp. 4748-4759, 2015.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:24:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210494390Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:29 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Iowa State University researchers have developed a simple and cost effective pretreatment step which addresses the processability of lignin for fast pyrolysis. The treating consists of exposing the lignin to mono-and di-basic chemicals, including NaOH, LiOH, Mg(OH)2, and Ca(OH)2. This process binds the reactive groups, but does not depolymerize the lignin. Pretreatment with these chemicals allows for continuous operation of a fluidized bed pyrolyzer without clogging the reactor vessels.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:S. Zhou et al., “The use of calcium hydroxide pretreatment to overcome agglomeration of technical lignin during fast pyrolysis”, Green Chemistry, 17, pp. 4748-4759, 2015.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForDesc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseMethods and Compositions for Backbone-Free Low Transgene Copy Transgenic Plantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21046Summary:
The innovation is an improvement on the use of Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer for the transformation of plants.

Description:
Iowa State University researchers working with Purdue University researchers have developed new approaches to generate transgenic plants that have no transformation vector backbone in plants having transgenes at a low copy number. Agrobacterium strains with T-DNA integrated into the chromosomal DNA of the Agrobacterium are shown to reduce the copy number and backbone sequences. The inventors have also developed chromosomal integration vectors to integrate T-DNA into a specific (picA/pgl) locus in the chromosome of Agrobacterium. Agrobacterium strains available for licensing are: EHA101, EHA105, GV3101, and LBA4404. The technology and associated materials are available for licensing on a non-exclusive basis.

Advantage:
• Proven technology
• Materials available
• Creation of high-quality transgenic plants

Application:
Construction of transgenic plants

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:06:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210463546Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:27 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:Construction of transgenic plantsStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesBackbone-Free Low Transgene Copy Transgenic PlantsUtilityUnited States8,334,42812/514,1805/8/200912/18/201212/19/201612/7/201511/13/2017FalseTackifiers from oligomeric polyesters of isosorbidehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21045Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed tackifiers from biorenewable sources that exhibit a maximum tack at approximately 80˚C.

Description:
Tackifiers are important components of adhesive formulas, providing the stickiness or tack to the adhesive.  ISURF #04118 describes the initial synthesis of tackifiers from isosorbide and cyclic anhydrides to produce compounds with maximum tack between -20˚C to 40˚C (depending on the choice of anhydride).  ISURF #04346 builds upon this work by creating short oligomers of these tackifiers, resulting in maximum tack performance at 80˚C.

Advantage:
• Cost competitive with hydrocarbon-based resins; cost-advantaged versus other natural resins
• Bio-based with abundant supply of starting materials

Application:
Tackifiers for hot melt adhesives

References:
References: 1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:58:23 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210454346Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:26 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:1. M.D. Zenner et al., “Unexpected Tackifiers from Isosorbide”, ChemSusChem, 8, pp. 448-451, 2015.

2. U.S. Patent Application 2015/0274861
]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4032: Diisocyanates from Bio-Renewable Sources and ISURF 4118: Biorenewable Isosorbide-Based Tackifiers, Adhesives, and Cross-Linked Resins

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSwine Influenza Viruses for Vaccine and Diagnosticshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21042Summary:
Iowa State University is making available for non-exclusive licensing two swine influenza A virus isolates with potential for research use, diagnostics, and development of vaccines. The viruses isolated in 2005 originated from pigs exhibiting respiratory stress. Both viruses  [A/Swine/ISUVDL11/05 (H3N2-cluster III) and A/Swine/ISUVDL12/05 (reassortant H1N1)] represent 2005 swine influenza viruses contemporary isolates of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes circulating in US swine populations.

Advantage:
• Ready to use
• Adapted to growth in culture

Application:
Animal Health/Vaccine Development/Diagnostics

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 13:27:44 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210423345Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:25 GMTSummary:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseDiffusion Barrier Vaccine Devicehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21025Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an implanted vaccine device designed to generate life-long antibody titers. The basis of the innovation is the slow release of an antigen embedded in a polymeric matrix. Antigen release is a function of the level of circulating antigen-specific antibodies.  By sensing the antibody levels, the device self-regulates antigen release thus ensuring antigen availability for continued antibody production.

Description:
The technology is a three-stage vaccine device, where stage 1 consists of vaccination with the antigen of interest using soluble adjuvant-based delivery. Stage two is a boost delivered using bio-erodible nanoparticles. Stage three is the “smart release” of vaccine where vaccine release is linked to antibody levels. The smart release utilizes a fibrillary matrix where, if immune complexes of antibody and antigen are present, they will be hindered from escaping the depot. If antibody levels fall, the complexes are dissociated and the antigen is small enough to escape from the vaccine depot. This provides a booster-like response leading to increased antibody production.

Advantage:
• Enables immune-regulated release of vaccine
• May reduce or eliminate the need for future booster vaccinations
• May be used with a number of various vaccines
• Addresses a very large market

Application:
Animal Health / Vaccine Development

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 10:17:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210254256Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:15 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseModification of the Nodulating, Nitrogen-Fixing Soybean Symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum to Increase Plant Disease Resistancehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21022Description:
B. japonicum has a symbiotic relationship with legumes. In addition to its nitrogen-fixation role, it produces a number of plant hormones that influence growth.  However, these hormones can have other effects on the plant. For example, gibberellin produced by B. japonicum has been found to suppress host plant disease resistance.
ISU researchers have developed a B. japonicum strain with the gibberellin synthesis operon deleted. It has been found to have to have a ten-fold decrease in the number of viable bacteria, but produces no discernible effect on nodulation, nitrogen fixation/reduction, or plant growth. The inventors have thus hypothesized that B. japonicum uses gibberellin to suppress plant host defenses, making it more susceptible to infection by microbial pathogens. They further postulate that deletion of the operon encoding gibberellin biosynthesis can be used to develop an inoculant that will result in a plant with enhanced disease resistance.

Advantage:
• Increased innate disease resistance
• Increased yields
• Reduction in pesticide use
• Applicable to other legumes
• Large market

Application:
Production of soybeans and other legumes

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]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:42:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210224119Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:12 GMTDescription:ISU researchers have developed a B. japonicum strain with the gibberellin synthesis operon deleted. It has been found to have to have a ten-fold decrease in the number of viable bacteria, but produces no discernible effect on nodulation, nitrogen fixation/reduction, or plant growth. The inventors have thus hypothesized that B. japonicum uses gibberellin to suppress plant host defenses, making it more susceptible to infection by microbial pathogens. They further postulate that deletion of the operon encoding gibberellin biosynthesis can be used to develop an inoculant that will result in a plant with enhanced disease resistance.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740AgricultureModification of Nitrogen-Fixing Rhizobacteria to Enhance Nodulated Plant ResistanceUtilityUnited States9,743,67314/712,4305/14/20158/29/20175/14/20359/8/201711/21/2017FalseArabidopsis Nonhost Resistance Genes(s) for Engineering Soybeans Resistant to Sudden Death Syndromehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/21061Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified genes in Arabidopsis that when transferred to soybeans enhance disease resistance in transient expression assays.

Description:
ISU researchers have carried out over many years a series of studies aimed to identify Arabidopsis genes that can transfer Arabidopsis’ resistance to infection by soybean pathogens to soybean plants. ISURF has granted rights to the first two genes identified under this program to a major agricultural biotech player. This new disclosure identifies additional Arabidopsis genes (Pss5, Pss21, and Pss25) which are involved in enhanced resistance to the soybean pathogens Phytophthora sojae and Fusarium virguliforme.   The Arabidopsis Pss genes confer resistance in soybean as detected by transient expression assays and efforts are underway to demonstrate similar results using stably transformed soybeans.

Advantage:
• Potential for enhanced resistance to soybean pathogens
• Widely accepted approach
• Potential synergies by co-expressing the Pss genes

Application:
Soybean Disease Resistance, Plant breeding, Genetic engineering

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4273: Soybean Genes for Enhanced SDS Resistance and ISURF 4277: Peptides to Neutralize FvTox1 Sudden Death Syndrome Toxin FvTox1 in Soybeans

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 08:05:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/210614276Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:08 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Group:ISURF 4273: Soybean Genes for Enhanced SDS Resistance and ISURF 4277: Peptides to Neutralize FvTox1 Sudden Death Syndrome Toxin FvTox1 in Soybeans

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage1.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740AgricultureFalseSoil Nitrate System for Precision Management of Nitrogen Fertilizer Applicationshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20755Description:
The soil nitrate sensing system allows nitrate to be analyzed rapidly in-real-time in the field. By measuring nitrate at multiple locations along with GPS coordinates for each location, the system can be used to rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations, which can be used as the basis for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications. Alternatively the sensor can be attached to (integrated with) a fertilizer applicator, allowing real time modulation of nitrogen fertilizer application rates based on measured soil nitrate levels. The soil nitrate sensing technology will make the Late Spring Nitrate Test (LSNT) practical and cost effective for precision nitrogen fertilizer applications.

Advantage:
• Real-time, on-the-go soil nitrate concentration sensing technology that can be attached to farm implements
• Measures soil nitrate concentrations in the parts per million range within ~1 second, so GPS registered data stream can be acquired
• Depth averaging (0 to 12 inches) to meet LSNT protocol
• System can rapidly generate a map of soil nitrate concentrations
• Makes precision sidedress nitrogen fertilizer applications possible – improving nitrogen use efficiency in crop production, saving farmers money, and reducing impact on the environment

Application:
Precision agriculture

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

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Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 12:48:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207554383Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:03 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForStage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acidhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20752Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:41 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207524402Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:Patent(s) Applied ForGroup:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseBioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediaminehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20750Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patents:
Patent(s) Applied For 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

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]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:39 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207504357Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:23:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:]]>Patents:]]>Group:ISURF #4289: Electrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursors, and ISURF #4402: Electrochemical Isomerization of Muconic Acid

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseElectrocatalytic Hydrogenation of Muconic Acid for the Production of Biorenewable Synthetic Polymer Precursorshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20749Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a flexible pathway to turn glucose into nylon or PET using inexpensive catalysts and moderate reaction conditions.

Description:
Using a combination of biological, electrochemical, and catalytic processes, ISU researchers have developed a pathway to convert glucose into precursors for both nylon and PET manufacture.  The first phase utilizes an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high levels of muconic acid from a glucose feedstock (a titer of 752mg/L).  Next, muconic acid can be partially hydrogenated to hexenedioic acid or fully hydrogenated to adipic acid via an electrochemical process.  Both hexenedioic acid and adipic acid can be combined with hexaminediamine to make Nylon 6,6.  If hexenedioic acid is used in the nylon backbone, the remaining double bond can be further modified using controlled radical polymerization to create a functionalized nylon with potential applications in packaging and other areas.  Alternately the muconic acid can undergo a series of reactions to produce terephthalic acid (one of the building blocks for PET, the most common thermoplastic polyester). These steps include electrocatalytically isomerizing the cis,cis- or cis,trans- muconic acid to the trans,trans- variant for PET and other high-value chemical production.  This suite of technologies enables the production of a variety of similar polymers with different physical characteristics that can be targeted toward specialized end products.

Advantage:
• Eliminates the use of petrochemicals in the production of a wide array of commonly used industrial and consumer products
• Tunable at several steps to produce similar polymers with different physical characteristics
• Inexpensive catalysts, moderate reaction conditions and high conversion rates
• Flexible pathway between nylon and PET
• Biomass byproducts have additional market value

Application:
Plastics, Clothing, Packaging, Containers

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

Stage1.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:49:38 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/207494289Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forGroup:ISURF #4357: Bioadvantaged Nylon: Polycondensation of 3-Hexenedioic Acid with Hexamethylenediamine

]]>Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngCraigForneyCommercialization Manager, Chemistry and Materials Sciencesceforney@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHaploid Inducing Genotype for Field and Specialty Cornhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20090Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new haploid inducer for specialty maize that can overcome dent sterility used in popcorn and organic breeding programs, as well as two selectable marker – R1-nj and Pl1 – for haploid selection.

Description:
Inbred corn lines have two identical copies of their genome, and are valuable breeding resources since offspring are identical to their parent. Since offspring of hybrids are genetically segregating, hybrid seed needs to be generated from genetically stable, parental inbred lines. Development of traditional corn inbred lines starts from heterozygous plants and requires continued self-pollination, which takes five to eight generations before an inbred line is pure enough to be combined with another inbred line to create a hybrid. Doubled haploid (DH) technology can be used to produce pure, inbred corn lines in just two generations, since the initial “haploid” offspring contain only a single genome instead of two, which is then doubled in this DH procedure.  So-called inducer lines are used as pollinators in the DH approach. 

The DH technology  has found broad acceptance in corn breeding. Specialty breeders such as popcorn and sweet corn breeders and organic growers use the dent sterility trait to prevent undesired field corn from pollinating their lines. The specialty inducer developed can be used for all donor materials, and especially in popcorn and organic breeding programs that use dent sterility (Ga1), to prevent uncontrolled pollinations with genetically modified field corn.
The inducer has two selectable markers for haploid identification: the kernel color marker R1-nj that allows haploid selection in the seed, and the root color marker Pl1 that allows haploid selection after germination in young seedlings. Inducer lines are adapted to the Midwest growing season and have comparable induction rates to previously released inducer lines.

Advantages:
• Simple dual seed color and root color selection increases the number of true positives.
• Haploid inducing rates comparable to European inducers but better suited to Midwest corn growing season
• Able to overcome dent sterility (Ga1)

Application:
Plant Breeding


Intellectual Property:
Tangible Property

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4065: Midwest Adapted Haploid Inducer for Maize

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
Lines will be available in the Fall of 2015

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]]>Fri, 07 Aug 2015 07:09:34 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/200904099Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

The DH technology  has found broad acceptance in corn breeding. Specialty breeders such as popcorn and sweet corn breeders and organic growers use the dent sterility trait to prevent undesired field corn from pollinating their lines. The specialty inducer developed can be used for all donor materials, and especially in popcorn and organic breeding programs that use dent sterility (Ga1), to prevent uncontrolled pollinations with genetically modified field corn.
The inducer has two selectable markers for haploid identification: the kernel color marker R1-nj that allows haploid selection in the seed, and the root color marker Pl1 that allows haploid selection after germination in young seedlings. Inducer lines are adapted to the Midwest growing season and have comparable induction rates to previously released inducer lines.

]]>Advantages:Application:Plant BreedingIntellectual Property:Tangible PropertyGroup:ISURF #4065: Midwest Adapted Haploid Inducer for Maize

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Lines will be available in the Fall of 2015Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseQTL Regulating Ear Productivity Traits in Maizehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/20089Summary:
Methods to increase ear productivity in maize

Description:
Increased grain yields should translate into improved productivity and profitability for farmers; hence, traits that improve yield should be desirable in seed sold to farmers. This invention identifies DNA markers associated with the following ear productivity traits in maize:

• Cob length
• Cob weight
• Cob diameter
• Kernel count
• Kernel weight
• Kernel row number

The ear productivity DNA markers of this invention might form the basis of hybrid seed with advanced genetics, and could be bundled with transgenic traits, or sold as conventional seed.

Advantage:
• Potential to develop maize with increased productivity
• Markers easily tractable using modern molecular techniques
• Applicable to conventional or genetically modified seeds

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The patented methodologies are ready to be applied for the commercial development of improved maize

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 07 Aug 2015 06:46:51 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/200893797Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:51 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

• Cob length
• Cob weight
• Cob diameter
• Kernel count
• Kernel weight
• Kernel row number

The ear productivity DNA markers of this invention might form the basis of hybrid seed with advanced genetics, and could be bundled with transgenic traits, or sold as conventional seed.]]>Advantage:Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesQTL Regulating Ear Productivity Traits in MaizeUtilityUnited States8,779,23313/180,9867/12/20117/15/201410/25/20318/7/201511/20/2017FalseMouse Monoclonal Anti Clostridium Perfringens Type D epsilon Toxin Antibody (Clone# 4D6)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19981Summary:
The 4D6 monoclonal antibody can detect nanogram quantities by Western blotting of both the Clostridium perfringens epsilon proto-toxin as well as the activated toxin

Description:
The epsilon toxin is one of 12 protein toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens, a Gram positive, anaerobic spore-forming rod. There are five strains of C. perfringens, designated A through E. Each strain produces a unique spectrum of toxins. The epsilon toxin is made by types B and D. This toxin is a pore-forming protein; it causes potassium and fluid leakage from cells. In addition to the epsilon toxin, Clostridium perfringens type D strains produce alpha toxin and type B strains produce alpha and beta toxins. C. perfringens type B causes severe enteritis in young calves, foals, lambs and piglets. Type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and, on rare occasions, in cattle. All five strains can infect wounds in any species.
The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

Advantage:
• Probably the only D epsilon toxin monoclonal antibody available commercially
• Can detect as little as 625pgs of recombinant  epsilon mutant toxoid.
• Easy detection with anti-mouse-IgG-HRP

Application:
Detection of the Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 20 Jul 2015 14:29:28 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/199814281Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:The innovation available for licensing is a monoclonal antibody (4D6) that can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect Epsilon toxin, a classified bio-terrorism agent. The researchers have observed in the lab that His-tagged epsilon toxoid forms spontaneous SDS-resistant multimers. 4D6 can also detect multimer forms of protein. 4D6 can also detect, native un-cleaved ETX proto-toxin as well trypsin cleaved fragments that have higher electrophoretic mobility.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:Tangible MaterialStage4.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseSSM Sequence Modelshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19750Description:
The SSM Sequence Models (SSMs) provide a mechanism for analyzing information and the relationships that may exist for that information in a much more computationally efficient manner than any current mechanisms in use today.  In its simplest terms, the SSMs can provide a spell checker that can identify a misspelled word and provide the correct spelling of the actual intended word.  In some of its more complex uses, the SSMs can provide voice recognition and speech synthesis, robotic learning using associative and auto associative memory, object recognition, Internet searching and categorization of information, and methods of recognizing, classifying, and analyzing biological sequences such as protein and DNA sequences–all with very high accuracy–to name a few.  Indeed, SSMs may be used in any application that currently use Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), and will provide these systems with an increase in speed and accuracy, and a decrease in the computing power that is needed to accomplish the specific task.  Further, unlike HMMs that often must be trained off line due to their computational complexity (particularly as the sequences involved become large), the SSMs can be trained in real time.  Simply put, SSMs are much more efficient and effective than HMMs in performing all of the tasks for which HMMs are currently used, and therefore provide an elegant replacement.

Advantage:
• Highly accurate and efficient
• Reduces computing power required for completing analysis
• Trainable in real-time
• Parallelizable

Application:
Pattern or Sequence Recognition Applications Including, but Not Limited to, Voice Recognition, Objection Recognition, Computational Biology, Robotic Learning, Search, and Classification

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
A prototype implementation for speech recognition demonstrating high accuracy and reduced computing power has been completed.

Desc0000.png

]]>Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:19:45 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/197503990Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:45 GMTDescription:

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseSoybean Mosaic Virus as a Transient Expression Vector for Soybeanshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19580Summary:
Identifying potentially useful genes for improving soybean can be time consuming. ISU researchers have developed a rapid method for expressing genes in soybean using soybean mosaic virus. These unpatented materials are being made available for non-exclusive license to interested third parties.

Description:
Researchers at Iowa State University have developed a virus-based transient expression vector for soybeans. This technology will allow rapid testing of the effect of genes of interest, without having to wait months for transformation of soybean plants with the target genes. The virus vector system is not intended as a replacement for stable transformation of soybean, rather it is intended as a tool to quickly identify the most useful genes to put into soybeans while reducing the number of genes that have to be put through the transformation process. The virus vector could also be used to express genes that would be lethal to the soybean or prevent its regeneration after the transformation event, or for expression of genes when only transient expression is desired.

Advantage:
• Commercially important genes can be quickly screened to observe expressed traits, thereby significantly decreasing screening time and increasing the number of samples that can be tested.

Application:
The vector is used for expression of genes in soybeans.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The Soybean Mosaic Virus (SMV) vector has been used to express three foreign genes (GUS, GFP, and AvrPto) and maintain the inserted genes for several weeks.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195802309Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:38 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:The vector is used for expression of genes in soybeans.Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740AgricultureFalseSoybeans Rich in Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids for Enhanced Nutritional Valuehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19579Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has developed a line of soybeans that is enriched in sulfur-containing amino acids.

Description:
Soybean seeds, while high in protein, are deficient in the two sulfur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine.  As a result, livestock growers spend millions of dollars annually to supplement soybean meal with methionine since cysteine cannot be synthesized de novo by animals and dietary methionine can be readily converted to cysteine.  To overcome this drawback, an ISU researcher has developed the first soybean seed line that is enriched in these sulfur-containing amino acids.  This soybean line thus has utility for enhancing the nutritional value of soy seed used as the basis for livestock feed or for food products for human consumption.  In addition, the soybean line was developed using a standard mutagenic procedure followed by traditional breeding methods, and thus is not genetically modified.

Advantage:
• Economical (eliminates the need for supplementing livestock rations with sulfur-containing methionine)
• Stable (analysis indicates that the line is homozygous for elevated seed sulfur concentration)

Application:
Soybean-based livestock feed and food products.

References:
"Selection of Soybean Mutants with Increased Concentrations of Seed Methionine and Cysteine”, John Imsande, 2001, Crop Science 41:510-515

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
A soybean line that is over 10% enriched for sulfur-containing amino acids has been developed, and ISU is seeking partners interested in its commercialization.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:57 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195792543Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:37 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:"Selection of Soybean Mutants with Increased Concentrations of Seed Methionine and Cysteine”, John Imsande, 2001, Crop Science 41:510-515

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalse"September Sun" Seaside Alder Cultivar (Alnus maritima)http://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19577Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new seaside alder cultivar, ‘September Sun’.

Description:
Seaside alder (Alnus maritima) is rare native species in North America.  ISU researchers have developed the first cultivar of seaside alder, ‘September Sun’, that is suitable for use as a nursery crop.  This rapid growing and easy to propagate cultivar is an ornamentally superior genotype and an appealing autumn-blooming landscape shrub.  In addition, this shrub associates with nitrogen-fixing bacteria—unlike almost all other shrub species—which allows the plants to grow on very poor soils and to improve soil quality for other plants.  ‘September Sun’ is also highly tolerant of flooded soils, and helps reduce soil erosion along streams and other riparian areas, making it ideal for landscape restoration projects involving erosion control and wetland remediation.
In various field trials, including one with over 1000 plants and one with a three year growth period, ‘September Sun’ was demonstrated to be the most densely foliated, symmetrical, and rapidly growing seaside alder genotype.

Advantage:
• Fast growing and symmetrical, with attractive foliage and better autumn color than other alders
• Suitable for use in USDA hardiness zones 4a through 8b
• Blooms mid-August through late September
• Able to thrive in wet soil and more drought resistant than other North American alders
• Thrives in nitrogen-poor soil
• Easy to propagate

Application:
Ornamental Landscaping and Environmental Restoration

References:
September Sun’. Seaside Alder, an Autumn-blooming Shrub Native to North America", William R. Graves and James A. Schrader, 2004, HortScience 39:438-439.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:


Bare root plants are currently available.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 22 May 2015 14:32:56 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/195773028Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:
In various field trials, including one with over 1000 plants and one with a three year growth period, ‘September Sun’ was demonstrated to be the most densely foliated, symmetrical, and rapidly growing seaside alder genotype.

]]>Advantage:

]]>Application:

]]>References:September Sun’. Seaside Alder, an Autumn-blooming Shrub Native to North America", William R. Graves and James A. Schrader, 2004, HortScience 39:438-439.

]]>Stage0.png

]]>Bare root plants are currently available.Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesSeaside Alder Named "September Sun"UtilityUnited StatesPP18,10110/719,16411/22/200310/2/20071/22/20245/22/201511/21/2017FalseAn Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector System for Soybean Functional Genomicshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19386Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved genetic tool for researching and understanding soybean genomics.

Description:
Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a new approach to so-called reverse genetics.  Using this technology, the expression of a known gene (or sequence) is altered and the resulting effect on plant phenotype is investigated.  VIGS is being increasingly used as a reverse genetics tool to study and identify functions of specific plant genes, especially in plants such as soybean that are refractory to other methods, such as transformation.  While RNA-based VIGS vectors have been developed for investigating gene function(s) in soybean, they are subject to RNA degradation, are not facile to manipulation, require in vitro RNA transcription, and are costly and time consuming.  As a result, these systems are not suitable for high-throughput genomics applications.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a highly reliable soybean gene expression and silencing vector. This second generation improvement over a previously described system is based on DNA inoculation and uses a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter driven Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) vector. Because the DNA-based BPMV vector is designed to silence multiple genes using a single construct, simultaneous testing of different combinations of genes to address questions related to genetic redundancy or epistasis is possible.  In addition, the vector can be used in soybean to validate the function of Arabidopsis gene homologues.

Advantage:
• Amenable to high through-put gene manipulation
• Highly efficient: obviates the need for in vitro transcription and infection using unstable RNA inoculation
• Enables silencing of multiple genes using a single construct
• Facilitates functional validation of Arabidopsis gene homologues
• Economical: eliminates the need for chemical stabilization of transcribed RNA

Application:
Soybean functional genomics

References:
C. Zhang, C. Yang, S. Whitham, J. Hill. "Development and Use of an Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector for Soybean". Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Journal. 22(2):123. 2009.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Highly reliable and efficient silencing of a variety of soybean genes, including those required for protein translation, defense signaling pathways, cytoskeleton, and roots, has been demonstrated.  The utility of the DNA-based BPMV VIGS vector in characterizing gene function has been shown using soybean homologues of Arabidopsis defense signaling pathways.

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]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:21 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193863585Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:05 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed a highly reliable soybean gene expression and silencing vector. This second generation improvement over a previously described system is based on DNA inoculation and uses a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter driven Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) vector. Because the DNA-based BPMV vector is designed to silence multiple genes using a single construct, simultaneous testing of different combinations of genes to address questions related to genetic redundancy or epistasis is possible.  In addition, the vector can be used in soybean to validate the function of Arabidopsis gene homologues.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:C. Zhang, C. Yang, S. Whitham, J. Hill. "Development and Use of an Efficient DNA-Based Viral Gene Silencing Vector for Soybean". Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Journal. 22(2):123. 2009.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740BPMV-Based Viral Constructs Useful for VIGs and Expression of Heterologous Proteins in LegumesUtilityUnited States8,569,57912/927,57911/18/201010/29/201311/18/20305/13/201511/21/2017FalseNon-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Plant Compounds for Nutraceutical or Pharmaceutical Useshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19384Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified compounds in orangegrass that have anti-inflammatory activity.

Description:
Medicinal plants, such as St. John’s Wort, have received attention as supplements to treat various conditions or to promote general health and well-being.  These plants also represent a valuable resource for the identification of compounds that may have utility as new therapeutic agents.  Hypericum gentianoides, or orangegrass, is a plant native to the eastern half of the United States that was used by Native Americans to treat a variety of disorders, such as fever or wounds.  While investigating the properties of organgegrass, ISU researchers have identified a series of closely related compounds in its extracts that exhibit anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of prostaglandin E synthesis.  These compounds are abundant in orangegrass relative to other secondary metabolites, demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity at low doses, and exhibit low cytotoxicity.  Thus, these natural compounds may have utility as nutraceuticals or as the basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents.

Advantage:
• Effective (doses as low as 1 ug/ml show anti-inflammatory activity)
• Abundant (the bioactive compounds account for approximately 20% of the dry plant tissue or 2% of the fresh tissue)
• Nontoxic (cytotoxicity is not observed at doses with anti-inflammatory activity)
• Versatile (may be used without modification for nutraceutical applications or as the starting point for new drug development)

Application:
Novel Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Topical Use or Drug Development

References:
“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
Molecular structure has been identified, and anti-inflammatory activity with limited cytotoxicity has been demonstrated at concentrations as low as 2 micromolar using purified compounds in a bioassay with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mammalian cells.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193843460Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:03 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Characterizing the Metabolic Fingerprint and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Hypericum gentianoides”, Matthew L. Hillwig, Kimberly D.P. Hammer, Diane F. Birt, Eve Syrkin Wurtele, 2008, J. Agric. Food Chem., 56 (12) 4359-4366

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAnti-Inflammatory and Anti-HIV Compositions and Methods of UseUtilityUnited States7,854,94612/129,3915/29/200812/21/20102/24/20295/13/201511/13/2017FalseMetacaspase II for Engineering Soybean for Disease Resistancehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19383Summary:
Root and stem rot of soybeans causes an estimated $300 million annually in economic losses to the agriculture industry. ISU researchers have identified a gene in that may be able to be used to create broad-spectrum resistance to root and stem rot, as well as other diseases, in soybeans.

Description:
Root and stem rot of soybeans is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae and results in significant economic losses each year in the agriculture industry. In the past, growing Phytophthora-resistant cultivars has been the major method of controlling this disease. Recently, however, ISU researchers have identified a gene encoding metacaspase II that is involved in the expression of Phytophthora resistance in soybeans. Metacaspase II has been shown to participate in regulating the cell death process in diseased plant tissues, and metacaspase II engineered soybean lines may be developed that have broad-spectrum resistance to a number of pathogens

Advantage:
• alternative to traditional plant breeding
• disease resistance cultivars can be developed quickly

Application:
Resistance to root and stem rot in soybeans.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:19 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193833397Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:02 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740AgricultureMetacaspase II in Engineering Soybean for Disease ResistanceUtilityUnited States7,943,82512/082,5784/11/20085/17/20114/1/20295/13/201511/13/2017FalseDifferential ELISA for PRRSV to Distinguish Vaccinated from Infected Animalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19382Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a diagnostic test that can distinguish animals vaccinated for protection against the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from those infected with the virus

Description:
PRRSV is an important pathogen of pigs, and causes hundreds of millions of dollars in losses to pork producers annually in the US alone due to reproductive disorders in sows and respiratory disease in piglets.  Modified live-attenuated vaccines (MLV and ATP) are available to help protect against PRRSV infection, but there are reports of acute PRRSV outbreaks in vaccinated herds with vaccine-like strains of the virus being identified.  This has lead to a need for a rapid assay that can be used for identifying and differentiating these vaccine-like isolates from field isolates of PRRSV.  While commercial diagnostic assays are available for PRRSV, they are unable to differentiate vaccinated animals from those that are naturally infected with the virus, or are too cumbersome and expensive for wide implementation.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based diagnostic assay that distinguishes vaccinated (with MLV) from infected animals.  This assay is based upon antigenic differences in the 2b protein between the commonly used PRRSV vaccine strain and field isolates which can be used as serological markers.  The assay may thus facilitate improved management practices for pork producers.

Advantage:
Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infected

Application:
Veterinary diagnostics

References:
“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
An indirect ELISA has been established and shown to distinguish between the PRRSV 2b protein region from vaccine strains and other isolates, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193823371Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:22:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Distinguishes MLV vaccinated from infectedApplication:

]]>References:“The 2b protein as a minor structural component of PRRSV”, Wai-Hong Wu, Ying Fang, Raymond R.R. Rowland, Steven R. Lawson, Jane Christopher-Hennings, Kyoung-Jin Yoon and Eric A. Nelson, 2005, Virus Res. 114:177-181.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Differential Immunoassay for PRRS Vaccine AntibodyContinuationUnited States8,541,18813/298,77611/17/20119/24/20139/25/20275/13/201511/13/2017FalseUniversal and Differential Serologic Assay for Influenza A Virushttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19381Summary:
ISU researchers have developed a diagnostic assay for swine influenza (Influenza A) that can distinguish between exposed and vaccinated animals. This ELISA-based assay is also able to detect all Influenza A viruses, regardless of subtype. The assay represents an improvement over currently available tests, and may help pork producers in managing this costly disease.

Description:
Swine influenza, or Influenza A, is an acute respiratory disease that can affect pigs of all ages and results in significant economic losses for pork producers. While detection of swine influenza virus (SIV) or viral antigen in the lung or nasal secretions from symptomatic animals is considered the definitive diagnosis of swine influenza, serologic tests are often used to detect animals that have been exposed to the virus since the disease has a very short duration and the virus quickly becomes undetectable. However, interpretation of serologic test results for the diagnosis of SIV is made difficult by the intensive use of vaccination, and the emergence of new subtypes and antigenic drift within a subtype. To address the need for serologic assays for SIV that detect infection regardless of subtype or antigenic variation, as well as the need to differentiate exposed from vaccinated animals, ISU researchers have developed a universal and differential serologic assay for influenza A virus. This ELISA-based assay detects two antigens: one that is conserved among all influenza A viruses, and a second antigen that is expressed in exposed but not vaccinated pigs.

Advantage:
• Comprehensive (the assay detects an antigen conserved among all swine influenza virus subtypes)
• Differential (can distinguish between exposed and vaccinated animals)
• Stable (use of recombinant antigens enables continuous production of reagents)

Application:
Diagnosis of swine influenza (Influenza A)

References:
“Characterization of the humoral immune response of experimentally infected and vaccinated pigs to swine influenza viral proteins”, Won-Il Kim, Wai-Hong Wu, Bruce Janke, and Kyoung-Jin Yoon, 2005, Arch. Viol. DOI: 10.1007/s00705-005-0615-9.

Stage2.png
Development Stage:
The serologic assay has been used to characterize the antibody responses of pigs to SIV antigens, and is ready for additional field evaluation.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:16 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193813288Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:59 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Characterization of the humoral immune response of experimentally infected and vaccinated pigs to swine influenza viral proteins”, Won-Il Kim, Wai-Hong Wu, Bruce Janke, and Kyoung-Jin Yoon, 2005, Arch. Viol. DOI: 10.1007/s00705-005-0615-9.

]]>Stage2.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineUniversal and Differential Serologic Assay for Swine Influenza VirusUtilityUnited States7,892,72911/473,4346/23/20062/22/20116/15/20285/13/201511/13/2017FalseSoybean Transformation and Regeneration Using Half-Seed Explantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19379Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a more efficient and robust method for genetic transformation and regeneration of soybeans using half-seed explants of mature soybean seeds.

Description:
Commonly used methods for soybean transformation such as the cotyledonary node (“coty node”) or embryogenic callus (“callus”) method have various disadvantages.  For example, the coty node method requires precise wounding of seedlings to introduce genetic material and in vitro germination that can result in low transformation efficiencies, poor reproducibility and non-germline transformation.  The callus method—in which embryonic tissue is bombarded with DNA-coated carrier particles—has the drawbacks of requiring a prolonged tissue culture period, and can also result in the complex insertion of genes into the plant genome and may result in the regeneration of sterile plants.  To overcome these disadvantages, ISU researchers have developed a method for efficient soybean transformation and regeneration using half-seed explants.  In this method, half-seed explants (separated cotyledonous tissues derived from mature soybeans) are infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a transgene of interest and regenerated in vitro using tissue culture medium.  Transgenic plants can be obtained within 9-10 months, and any suitable genotype of soybean can be used with this method.  Because this approach does not require technical precision or prolonged tissue culture, it is more efficient and robust than other soybean transformation methods.

Advantage:
• Efficient (transformation efficiency of 2.4 - 7.8% compared to 0.3 – 2.8% for the coty node method has been demonstrated) 
• Simple (the half-seed method is easy to prepare and does not require a prolonged tissue culture period when compared to the callus culture system)
• Reproducible (does not require precise wounding or particle bombardment, so gene insertion events and transformation are more reliable)

Application:
Soybean transformation

References:
“Improved cotyledonary node method using an alternative explant derived from mature seed for efficient Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation”, M. Paz, J.C. Martinez, A. Kalvig, T. Fonger, and K. Wang, 2006, Plant Cell Reports 25: 206-213.

Supporting Documents:


MS PowerPoint:  Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using “Half-Seed” Explants

Stage5.png
Development Stage:
Transgenic soybean plants derived from the half-seed explants have been produced and confirmed in the R0 and R1 generations through molecular analysis, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193793122Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:57 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:“Improved cotyledonary node method using an alternative explant derived from mature seed for efficient Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation”, M. Paz, J.C. Martinez, A. Kalvig, T. Fonger, and K. Wang, 2006, Plant Cell Reports 25: 206-213.

]]>

]]>Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using “Half-Seed” Explants

]]>Stage5.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Soybean Transformation and Regeneration Using Half-Seed ExplantUtilityUnited States7,473,82211/475,3186/27/20061/6/20098/7/20275/13/201511/13/2017FalseA Drug Delivery Platform for Targeting Intracellular Pathogenshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19374Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed an improved method for delivering antibiotics inside infected cells for more effective treatment.

Description:
Bioerodible polymers have been researched for potential biomedical applications like drug or vaccine delivery for a number of years.  For example, polyesters such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been FDA approved for some applications; however, their suitability for others, such as vaccine delivery, is limited by factors that affect the stability of protein immunogens, such as producing a low pH milieu or inducing protein aggregation as well as acidic compartmentalization that is detrimental to the effectiveness of most antibiotics. In contrast, polyanhydrides have a number of potential advantages for biomedical applications, including chemistry-dependent surface erosion and payload release, a moderate pH microenvironment, and better protein stabilization; polyanhydrides have been used for delivery of plasmid DNA, small molecular weight compounds, and vaccine components.  In addition, polyanhdride microspheres and nanospheres (PAparticles) elicit unique cellular responses from immune cells that stimulate internalization, direct intracellular trafficking and degrade slowly within the cells.  Varying the chemistry of the particle affects particle degradation and alters the fate of the particle within cells. This characteristic can be exploited to target intracellular pathogens which evade host defenses by adapting themselves to the environment within cells and escape killing by antibiotics.  ISU researchers have now developed PAparticles with modified surface chemistries that are capable of entering host cells and delivering antibiotics in the same microenvironment as that of an intracellular pathogen.  Loading of the antibiotics onto the PAparticles does not chemically modify the antibiotics or negate their antimicrobial function. This highly effective targeting of the intracellular environment has to potential to reduce the amount of antibiotic needed to treat such an infection and also provide delayed release, thus improving the bioavailablity of the drug.

Advantage:
• Enhanced uptake compared to PLGA particles
• Targets more favorable intracellular compartments
• Potential for longer bioavailability of encapsulated antibiotics
• Provides greater encapsulation of hydrophobic antibiotics compared to PLGA particles

Application:
Drug delivery

References:
1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Co-localization of the polyanhydride particles with the intracellular pathogen M. paratuberculosis in tissue culture cells has been demonstrated, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:10 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193743729Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:55 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Polymer Chemistry Influences Monocytic Uptake of Polyanhydride nanospheres” B. Ulery, Y. Phanse, A. Sinha, M. Wannemuehler, B. Narasimhan, and B. Bellaire, 2009, Pharm. Res. 26:683-690.

]]>Group:ISURF #4211: Polyanhydride Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Antiparasites and ISURF #3176: Single Dose Controlled Release Vaccine Formulations Using Polyanhydride Microspheres

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Healthcare| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineAntimicrobial Compositions and MethodsUtilityUnited States8,449,91612/940,87211/5/20105/28/20134/10/20315/13/201511/13/2017Antimicrobial Polyanhydride NanoparticlesContinuationUnited States8,927,02413/866,5204/19/20131/6/201511/5/20305/13/201511/13/2017FalseGenes Controlling Plant Growthhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19373Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified a gene, termed HERK1, which increases plant growth in a model system when it is overexpressed. 

Description:
A variety of internal (e.g., hormones) and external signals (e.g., light) are known to play a role in the regulation of plant growth. These regulatory pathways are complex and can intersect at a variety of levels; for example, brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of plant steroid hormones, controls cell elongation in plants in conjunction with environmental cues. As part of a research effort to probe the intricate mechanisms involved in regulating plant growth, ISU researchers have discovered that a family of receptor-like kinases, including HERCULES1, THESEUS1, and FERONIA, are regulated by BRs and are required for optimal plant growth. Studies by the ISU group have shown that this previously unknown pathway plays a role in cell elongation, with overexpression of HERK1 resulting in increasing a plant’s size by 10-15% using an Arabidopsis model, while underexpression of HERK1 and related genes resulted in plants that were approximately 50% smaller. Additional research into pathway this may result in strategies for increasing the size and yield of grain and biomass crops. 

Advantage:
• Shown experimentally to increase plant growth 10-15%
• <May improve grain and biomass yields/rss.Adv2>

Application:
Control of plant growth.

References:
1: “Three related receptor-like kinases are required for optimal cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana”, H. Guo, L. Li, H. Ye, X. Yu, A. Algreen, and Y. Yin, Y.,  2009, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:7648-7653.

2: “A Family of Receptor-Like Kinases Are Regulated by BES1 and Involved in Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana”, H. Guo, H. Ye, L. Li, L., and Y. Yin, 2009, Plant Signaling & Behavior 4:784-786.

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Overexpression of the HERK1 receptor kinase has been demonstrated to increase plant growth using an Arabidopsis thaliana model system, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:09 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193733723Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:54 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Three related receptor-like kinases are required for optimal cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana”, H. Guo, L. Li, H. Ye, X. Yu, A. Algreen, and Y. Yin, Y.,  2009, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:7648-7653.

2: “A Family of Receptor-Like Kinases Are Regulated by BES1 and Involved in Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana”, H. Guo, H. Ye, L. Li, L., and Y. Yin, 2009, Plant Signaling & Behavior 4:784-786.

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesModulation of receptor-Like Kinases for Promotion of Plant GrowthContinuationUnited States9,512,44013/773,1502/21/201312/6/20161/31/203312/15/201611/13/2017FalseEnhanced Plant Growth through Mobile RNA Signalshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19371Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified mobile RNAs in potatoes whose overexpression enhances plant growth.

Description:
Plants have evolved intricate signaling pathways to regulate growth and other physiological processes. Light quality and duration play an important role in providing external cues perceived by the plant. Photoperiod is an example of one such external signal that controls important physiological processes like flowering, dormancy, germination, senescence, and tuber formation. During tuber formation, a graft-transmissible signal initiated in the leaves moves through the vascular system to induce a growth response.  ISU researchers have discovered that this signal is due to mobile RNAs encoding for two transcription factors (BEL and KNOX) and shown that their overexpression enhances plant growth even under non-inductive conditions.   In addition to a substantial increase in the number of tubers and the potential to regulate flowering, this technology may have utility for acceleration of tuber growth in field plants, thus shortening the time for field cultivation.  It could also be used to shorten the timing of a “late” potato variety to produce an earlier harvest.  This technology may also have utility for the production of bio-pharmaceuticals or other useful compounds in potatoes.

Advantage:
• Acceleration of  tuber growth, shortening the time for field cultivation
• Potential for earlier harvest for “late” potato varieties
• May be used to regulate flowering
• Enhanced tuber formation

Application:
Plant production

References:
1: “Interacting Transcription Factors from the Three-Amino Acid Loop Extension Superclass Regulate Tuber Formation,” Chen, H., Rosin, F.M., Prat, S., and Hannapel, D. J., 2003, Plant Physiol. 132:1391-1404.

 

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4587: Potato tuber yield enhancement

 

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
Transgenic lines of potatoes have been shown to produce more tubers at a faster rate than controls, and ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Wed, 13 May 2015 11:03:08 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/193713056Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:1: “Interacting Transcription Factors from the Three-Amino Acid Loop Extension Superclass Regulate Tuber Formation,” Chen, H., Rosin, F.M., Prat, S., and Hannapel, D. J., 2003, Plant Physiol. 132:1391-1404.

]]>Group:ISURF 4587: Potato tuber yield enhancement

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesMobile RNA Acts as a Signal to Regulate Plant Growth and DevelopmentUtilityUnited States7,579,15011/172,0236/30/20058/25/20093/26/20275/13/201511/13/2017FalsePiezoelectric-Based Vibration Energy Harvesterhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19689Summary:
The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.


Description:
A potential means of extending battery life is the use of miniature renewable self-contained power supply units, which can convert ambient vibrations from existing sources in their environment into electrical form, and use this harvested energy to supplement batteries and/or other energy storage elements.  This invention employs a unique nonlinear, self-tuning, bistable vibration energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from broadband and varying-amplitude sources, combined with synchronized energy extraction circuits using electronic breaker switches for efficient harvesting.

Advantage:
• Extends battery life by effectively converting ambient vibrations into electrical energy
• Combines nonlinear bistable transduction with synchronized extraction
• Piezoelectric harvester with a simple micro-engineered design allowing a variety of material choices for ease of implementation
• ~100X increased harvested power, especially for broadband variations, compared to other harvesters using the same input, due to bistable transduction and synchronized extraction
• Presents a completely mechanical, zero-energy-cost method to increase range of excitation amplitudes over which the system remains bistable, further doubling the efficiency over varying amplitude excitations
• Presents for the first time an accurate mathematical model for a bistable transducer by augmenting the Butterworth van Dyke piezoelectric model to capture external magnetic forces

Application:
Remote sensors that can harvest ambient mechanical vibrations/energy to extend their battery life.

References:
Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Stage2.png
Development Stage:

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:35 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196894354Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:52 GMTSummary:The invention converts ambient vibrations into electrical form as a potential means of extending battery life.  Because of its bistable transduction and synchronized extraction, there has been a ~100X increase in harvested power, especially for broadband variations compared to other harvesters using the same input.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Conference proceedings:  “Piezoelectric-based Broadband Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester and SCE/SSHI-based High-Power Extraction”, Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, 11th IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, Miami, FL

Journal publication: “A Broadband Bistable Piezoelectric Energy Harvester with Nonlinear High-Power Extraction,” Kanishka Aman Singh, Ratnesh Kumar and Robert J. Weber, IEEE Transactions of Power Electronics, in press, accepted Dec 2014.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forStage2.pngDevelopment Stage:Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTrees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Aspen Cloneshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19682

Summary:
Improved aspen clones that produce increased biomass have been developed at Iowa State University.

Description:
Fast growing trees such as aspen, cottonwood, and eucalyptus can be grown as so-called short rotation crops, and have potential to be used as a source of woody biomass for the production of biofuels such as wood pellets and cellulosic ethanol.  In the prime cottonwood growing region, which includes eastern Louisiana, eastern Arkansas, western Mississippi and western Kentucky, cottonwoods can grow 12-15 feet per year, allowing them to be harvested biennially.   In addition, cottonwoods will regrow from stumps, so that plantings may be managed through coppicing. However, cottonwoods in the Great Plains are susceptible to melampsora leaf rust, which reduces their vigor.  Aspens are also being targeted for development as a bioenenergy crop with the added advantage that they re-sprout from both the stumps and the roots.  Improved hybrid aspen clones that produce increased biomass have been developed at Iowa State University.  These trees may facilitate the development of aspen plantations for biomass production in Iowa and similar climatic zones.

Advantage:
• The non-GMO hybrid aspen clones have increased biomass production, good ability to re-sprout, and have the potential to be grown on marginal lands

Application:
Bioenergy; paper and pulp

References:
Headlee, W. L. et al. 2013. Establishment of alleycropped hybrid aspen “Crandon” in Central Iowa: effects of topographic position and fertilizer rate on above ground biomass production and allocation.  Sustainability 5:2874-2886

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4156: Trees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Cottonwoods

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The trees have been growing for several years and could be propagated by shoot or root cuttings

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:53 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196824157Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:36 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Headlee, W. L. et al. 2013. Establishment of alleycropped hybrid aspen “Crandon” in Central Iowa: effects of topographic position and fertilizer rate on above ground biomass production and allocation.  Sustainability 5:2874-2886

]]>Group:ISURF #4156: Trees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Cottonwoods

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalsePorcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group Ahttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19286Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have isolated porcine rotaviruses from Groups A and C that may have utility for improved vaccines and diagnostics.

Description:
Porcine rotavirus is very widespread in pig populations, and young animals are particularly susceptible to infection.  Porcine rotavirus also causes significant economic losses to pork producers due to mortality and lost productivity.  Rotavirus persists in the environment and resists disinfectants, so management practices are an important part of preventing and controlling infection.  There are a wide variety of different porcine rotavirus strains, with Group A rotaviruses of G9 genotype representing the majority of contemporary group A porcine rotaviruses causing enteric disease in weaned piglets in the US and elsewhere, and group C rotavirus G6 isolates representing a majority of contemporary type C rotaviruses causing severe diarrhea in neonates.  A licensed commercial vaccine is available to help combat infection by porcine rotavirus, but it contains only group A viruses which belong to G4 and G5 types; no vaccine against Group C rotavirus is apparently currently available, so vaccinated pigs or piglets may still be vulnerable to infection.  To address this challenge, ISU researchers have recently isolated, characterized, and reliably propagated a Group A rotaviruses of G9 genotype as well as a group C porcine rotavirus G6 from infected piglets showing clinical symptoms. In addition to their utility as reference strains, these rotavirus isolates may also be used for the development of improved vaccines against porcine rotavirus as well as for the production of diagnostic reagents or kits.

Advantage:
• Can be reliably propagated in an in vitro system
• Pure isolate
• Replicates to relatively high titer

Application:
Veterinary vaccines and diagnostics; reference strain

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3935: Porcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group C

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The Group A and Group C porcine rotavirus isolates have been adapted to an in vitro cell culture system, their pathogenicity has been assessed, and they have been demonstrated to be free of any other contaminants.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing these isolates for vaccine or diagnostics development.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 09:01:43 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192863936Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:35 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF #3935: Porcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group C

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalsePorcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group Chttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19285Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have isolated porcine rotaviruses from Groups A and C that may have utility for improved vaccines and diagnostics.

Description:
Porcine rotavirus is very widespread in pig populations, and young animals are particularly susceptible to infection.  Porcine rotavirus also causes significant economic losses to pork producers due to mortality and lost productivity.  Rotavirus persists in the environment and resists disinfectants, so management practices are an important part of preventing and controlling infection.  There are a wide variety of different porcine rotavirus strains, with Group A rotaviruses of G9 genotype representing the majority of contemporary group A porcine rotaviruses causing enteric disease in weaned piglets in the US and elsewhere, and group C rotavirus G6 isolates representing a majority of contemporary type C rotaviruses causing severe diarrhea in neonates.  A licensed commercial vaccine is available to help combat infection by porcine rotavirus, but it contains only group A viruses which belong to G4 and G5 types; no vaccine against Group C rotavirus is apparently currently available, so vaccinated pigs or piglets may still be vulnerable to infection.  To address this challenge, ISU researchers have recently isolated, characterized, and reliably propagated a Group A rotaviruses of G9 genotype as well as a group C porcine rotavirus G6 from infected piglets showing clinical symptoms. In addition to their utility as reference strains, these rotavirus isolates may also be used for the development of improved vaccines against porcine rotavirus as well as for the production of diagnostic reagents or kits.

Advantage:
• Can be reliably propagated in an in vitro system
• Pure isolate
• Replicates to relatively high titer

Application:
Veterinary vaccines and diagnostics; reference strain

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #3936: Porcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group A

Stage0.png
Development Stage:
The Group A and Group C porcine rotavirus isolates have been adapted to an in vitro cell culture system, their pathogenicity has been assessed, and they have been demonstrated to be free of any other contaminants.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing these isolates for vaccine or diagnostics development.

Desc0000.png

]]>Fri, 08 May 2015 09:01:43 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192853935Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:14 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF #3936: Porcine Rotavirus Isolates for Improved Vaccines: Group A

]]>Stage0.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseDevice to Determine Susceptibility to Root Lodginghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19214Summary:
Researchers have developed a device that can be used to measure root lodging susceptibility in corn.

Description:
Corn is one of the most important and valuable crops grown in the US.  Because of its significance to agriculture, corn breeders strive to develop corn hybrids that are agronomically sound, with traits such as insect and disease resistance, tolerance for heat and drought, and high yield.  Mechanical harvesting of corn also demands that plants be uniform in growth rate, stand establishment, and size. In order for corn plants to stand tall and withstand various mechanical forces applied to the stalk, such as wind, rain, or harvesting equipment, it is important for the plant stalk to have good mechanical properties and be firmly anchored in the soil by its roots; traits such as stalk lodging and root lodging are related to the plant’s mechanical properties. Stalk lodging is breakage of the stalk below the ear while root lodging is where a plant leans away from the vertical access at a 30 degree angle or greater. Researchers have now developed a device that can be used to can be used to measure a corn hybrid’s susceptibility to root lodging earlier in the development of cycle of a new hybrid when fewer plants may be available for testing.  This device pushes on a corn stalk to simulate root lodging; it measures the vibration as force is exerted on the stalk and breakage occurs, and records the data. Thus, accurate comparisons among hybrids without the need to wait for wind or other environmental event to measure lodging are enabled. In addition, this handheld device is portable and easy to use, making it suitable for routine field testing.

Advantage:
• Enables testing for root lodging susceptibility earlier in the corn hybrid development cycle
• Allows for quantitative measurement of root lodging susceptibility and hybrid to hybrid comparisons
• Hand held and portable for easy field testing

Application:
Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodging

Other Patent:
Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926

Development Stage:
The device has been tested under a variety of soil conditions and plant maturity levels and has been shown to distinguish between strong and weak corn hybrids.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Stage0.png
Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 11:02:48 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/192143589Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:01 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:Determination of corn plant susceptibility to root lodgingOther Patent:Canadian Patent No. 2,738,926]]>Development Stage:

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740Correlating Push Force and Stalk Vibration to a Plant's Susceptibility to Root LodgingUtilityUnited States7,987,73512/577,32910/12/20098/2/201112/26/20295/5/201511/13/2017FalseDisease Resistant Ricehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19134Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed disease resistant rice using genome editing technology.

Description:
Bacterial blight is a major disease in rice—a crop that feeds half the world’s population. The TALEs (transcription activator-like effectors) proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria  induce disease in susceptible rice plants  by binding to specific DNA sequences to activate gene expression. In rice, TALEs  secreted by X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) act as virulence factors and activate transcription of disease susceptibility, or S genes. One important bacterial blight susceptibility gene is Os11N3.To test the possibility of developing bacterial blight resistant plants, ISU researchers used the targeted genome editing capability of TALENs (TAL effectors fused to a DNA cleavage domain to generate specific nucleases) to edit the Os11N3 gene. The experiments were successful resulting in disease resistant mutant plants that were morphologically normal compared to wild-type plants, indicating that the known developmental function of Os11N3 was preserved.  This application demonstrates the utility of TALENs for making specific modifications in endogenous plant genes, and consequently may have broad applicability for streamlining plant breeding for the development of new agronomically important traits.

Advantage:
• Increased bacterial blight resistance without introducing foreign genes
• Rapid route to creating disease-resistant rice in elite lines

Application:
Crop improvement

References:
1: “High-efficiency TALEN-based gene editing produces disease-resistant rice”, T. Li., B. Liu., M. Spalding, D. Weeks, and B. Yang. 2012. Nature Biotechnology 30:390-392.

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:20 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191343974Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:21:00 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>]]>Application:

]]>References:1: “High-efficiency TALEN-based gene editing produces disease-resistant rice”, T. Li., B. Liu., M. Spalding, D. Weeks, and B. Yang. 2012. Nature Biotechnology 30:390-392.

]]>Development Stage:Stage2.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesGenetically Modified Plants with Resistance to Xanthomonas and Other Bacterial Plant PathogensUtilityUnited States9,688,99714/362,5296/3/20146/27/20178/16/20347/17/201711/13/2017FalseContemporary Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) Viruses for Improved Vaccineshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19132Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has purified a set of contemporary bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates that may be useful as vaccine strains.

Description:
The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes disease in cattle and other ruminants. Diseased animals may show respiratory and reproductive symptoms ranging from mild to very severe, in some cases resulting in the death of the animal. The disease primarily affects young cattle and usually results in mucosal lesions that can be misdiagnosed because of their similarity to infections by other viruses. BVDV effects significant economic losses to producers globally, and persistently infected cattle may explain the magnitude of such loses since the persistently infected animals are disease reservoirs. Treatment is usually supportive therapy, while control is through management practices (e.g., good biosecurity), elimination of infected animals, and vaccination. While there are a number of BVDV vaccines available, vaccination programs do not provide complete herd protection, which is likely due to an incomplete correspondence between the contemporary antigenic determinants in the field compared to those used for vaccination.  For example, most commercially available modified live vaccines do not appear to protect against BVDV-1b, a strain that emerged in the 1990s in persistently infected cattle.  An ISU investigator has isolated contemporary BVDVs comprising various genotypes (e.g., type 1a, 1b or 2) and biotypes (cytopathic or non-cytopathic strains). Some of the ISU isolates came from diseased animals vaccinated with commercially available BVDV vaccines, further suggesting that current vaccines need to be updated.  Consequently, these new isolates may be useful to develop improved vaccines. Other uses include diagnostics and as challenge strains for vaccine development.

Advantage:
• More representative of currently circulating BVDV strains than strains used in current commercial vaccines
• Include various genotypes and biotypes
• Have utility for vaccine development, diagnostics, or as challenge strains

Application:
Animal health

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Development Stage:
Stage1.png
Fourteen BVD V isolates representing different geographic origins (IA, MO, TN) and comprising various genotypes and biotypes have been purified, and ISU is seeking commercialization partners.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:18 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191324007Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:58 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Development Stage:Stage1.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineFalseMidwest Adapted Haploid Inducer for Maizehttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19126Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a new haploid inducer for maize that is adapted to growing conditions in the Midwest.

Description:
Inbred corn lines have two identical copies of their genome, and are valuable breeding resources since offspring are identical to their parent. Since offspring of hybrids are genetically segregating, hybrid seed needs to be generated from genetically stable, parental inbred lines. Development of traditional corn inbred lines starts from heterozygous plants and requires continued self-pollination, which takes five to eight generations before an inbred line is pure enough to be combined with another inbred line to create a hybrid. Doubled haploid (DH) technology can be used to produce pure, inbred corn lines in just two generations, since the initial “haploid” offspring contain only a single genome instead of two, which is then doubled in this DH procedure.  So-called inducer lines are used as pollinators in the DH approach.  However, inducer lines currently available for licensing are European in origin and are poorly adapted to growing conditions found in the US Corn Belt in the Midwest in that they can have poor germination rates, can be susceptible to wind (lodging), have poor seed set and are susceptible to mold.  To overcome the limitations of currently available inducer lines, ISU researchers have developed a haploid inducer for maize that is better adapted to the conditions found during a typical growing season in the Midwest. Midwest adapted inducers can benefit corn breeding companies, but may be particularly attractive to smaller companies in the US and abroad.

Advantage:
• Better suited for Midwest corn growing season
• Haploid induction rates comparable to European inducers
• Simple phenotypic seed color selection

Application:
Plant breeding

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4099: Haploid Inducing Genotype for Field and Specialty Corn

Development Stage:
Stage4.png
Ready for release.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191264065Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:54 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF #4099: Haploid Inducing Genotype for Field and Specialty Corn

]]>Development Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseCry3Bb1-Resistant Strains of Western Corn Rootworm - Hopkinton Strainhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19125Summary:
An Iowa State University researcher has identified a strain of western corn rootworm that is resistant to Bt toxin Cry3Bvb1, and this strain can be used for probing the basis of resistance and for developing new management strategies.

Description:
The western corn rootworm is among the most damaging pests of corn crops.  Control costs and economic losses together total over $1 billion annually in the US.  However, the western corn rootworm has overcome conventional strategies such as crop rotation and small molecule insecticides by developing resistance.  While some soil insecticides still afford acceptable protection levels, their potential to cause environmental damage and human health risks has led to the development of transgenic corn lines expressing Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) toxin genes for rootworm control. As more and more transgenic corn with the Bt is grown in the US, the ability to monitor pests for resistance becomes increasingly important.  In addition, understanding the mechanisms that lead to development of pest resistance to Bt corn is important for maximizing the utility of this trait as well as for the development of new management technologies.  As part of a research program related to adaptation by pests to crop rotation and to genetically modified corn that produces insecticidal (Bt) toxins, an ISU investigator has identified populations of western corn rootworm resistant to the Cry3Bb1 protein, the first Bt trait available in the market place.  These populations have subsequently been developed into laboratory strains that may have utility for understanding the genetics and molecular basis of resistance to Bt corn in corn rootworms, as well as for the development of new management technologies for Bt resistant rootworms.

Advantage:
• Laboratory adapted so that multiple generations may be raised per year
• May enable better understanding of resistance mechanisms
• May enable development of new management strategies

Application:
Bt resistance monitoring and management

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Development Stage:
Stage4.png
Ready for commercialization:  field isolates have been adapted into laboratory strains suitable for propagating multiple generations per year for probing resistance mechanisms and management of resistant populations.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 07:01:14 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191254049Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:53 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) toxin genes for rootworm control. As more and more transgenic corn with the Bt is grown in the US, the ability to monitor pests for resistance becomes increasingly important.  In addition, understanding the mechanisms that lead to development of pest resistance to Bt corn is important for maximizing the utility of this trait as well as for the development of new management technologies.  As part of a research program related to adaptation by pests to crop rotation and to genetically modified corn that produces insecticidal (Bt) toxins, an ISU investigator has identified populations of western corn rootworm resistant to the Cry3Bb1 protein, the first Bt trait available in the market place.  These populations have subsequently been developed into laboratory strains that may have utility for understanding the genetics and molecular basis of resistance to Bt corn in corn rootworms, as well as for the development of new management technologies for Bt resistant rootworms.

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Development Stage:Stage4.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740False"Healthy Beef": Fatty Acid Synthase Genetic Markers Associated with a Healthier Fatty Acid Compositionhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19120Summary:
The amount of saturated and unsaturated fat in meat and dairy products is of significant interest because of their implications for human health, and in particular, the relationship between consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol levels.  ISU researchers have recently developed a genetic marker for identifying cattle that have a more healthful fatty acid composition.

Description:
Research has shown that human consumption of large amounts of saturated fats in foods such as meat can lead to heart disease.  ISU researchers investigating the bovine fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene have recently determined that the percentage of saturated fatty acids and the atherogenic index are associated with small genetic differences in the FAS gene.   Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and a method was developed to identify these genetic markers.  This method has the potential to be a useful tool to genetically predict the fatty acid composition of beef or milk. In addition, the development of improved breeds could be accelerated since young animals can be tested before the meat or milk was harvested.

Advantage:
• Enables accelerated selection of cattle for “heart healthier” meat and dairy products compared to traditional breeding methods.

Application:
Rapid genetic selection of breeding stock with a lower atherogenic index and higher levels of healthier monounsaturated fatty acids

References:
Zhang, S., T. J. Knight, J. M. Reecy, and D. C. Beitz. 2008.  DNA polymorphisms in bovine fatty acid synthase are associated with beef fatty acid composition. Animal Genetics 39:62-70.

Development Stage:
Stage0.png
Commercial feasibility has been demonstrated, and  Iowa State University is seeking partners for non-exclusive licensing of this technology.

Desc0000.png


]]>Mon, 04 May 2015 06:51:32 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191203499Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:52 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:ISU researchers investigating the bovine fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene have recently determined that the percentage of saturated fatty acids and the atherogenic index are associated with small genetic differences in the FAS gene.   Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and a method was developed to identify these genetic markers.  This method has the potential to be a useful tool to genetically predict the fatty acid composition of beef or milk. In addition, the development of improved breeds could be accelerated since young animals can be tested before the meat or milk was harvested.

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:

]]>References:Zhang, S., T. J. Knight, J. M. Reecy, and D. C. Beitz. 2008.  DNA polymorphisms in bovine fatty acid synthase are associated with beef fatty acid composition. Animal Genetics 39:62-70.

]]>Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life Sciences| Veterinary MedicineGenetic Markers in Fatty Acid Synthase for Identification of Meat Product Fatty Acid Content in CattleUtilityUnited States7,910,30812/177,4367/22/20083/22/20117/22/20285/4/201511/13/2017FalseImmunodeficient Pigs for Biomedical Researchhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19191Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have identified pigs that have a severely impaired immune system that could serve as important biomedical model for the study of immune system and other diseases in humans.

Description:
Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a genetic defect that causes newborn animals to lack T or B cells in circulation and to have few or no lymphocytes in their primary or secondary lymphoid tissues.  SCID has been shown to have an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in certain mouse strains as well as in horses, some dog breeds, and humans, but is perhaps best known as the ‘bubble boy’ disease, which is an X-linked version of SCID in humans.  Affected neonates do not show clinical manifestations of the defect while suckling.  However, as maternal antibody wanes, the animals become susceptible to opportunistic infections to which they inexorably succumb. ISU researchers and their colleagues at Kansas State University have recently identified a SCID-like syndrome in a line of pigs originally bred for traits related to feed efficiency.  Because of the closer physiological resemblance between humans and pigs, these animals may have utility as a biomedical model for SCID and immunodeficiency diseases in humans that is more suitable than the current mouse models.  In addition, the anatomical and physiological similarities between humans and pigs would make these SCID pigs a superior biomedical model for research into cell and tissue transplantation, cancer research and efficacy of chemotherapeutics, as well as for testing new vaccines.

Advantage:
• More clinically relevant model for investigation of human immunodeficiency, cancer, and other diseases

Application:
Biomedical research

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

Development Stage:
Stage0.png
Matings that produced the affected pigs have been repeated and all litters have been confirmed to have at least one affected pig; genotyping analysis is in process.  ISU is seeking commercialization partners for these valuable research animals.

Desc0000.png

]]>Tue, 05 May 2015 10:38:58 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/191913992Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:49 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:]]>Application:]]>Group:ISURF 4044: Genetic Basis and Test for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in Pigs and related patent(s).

]]>Development Stage:Stage0.png

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseTrees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Cottonwoodshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19681

Summary:
Eastern cottonwoods (Populus deltoides) that are suitable for planting in Iowa that produce increased biomass have been developed at Iowa State University.

Description:
Fast growing trees such as aspen, cottonwood, and eucalyptus can be grown as so-called short rotation crops, and have potential to be used as a source of woody biomass for the production of biofuels such as wood pellets and cellulosic ethanol.  In the prime cottonwood growing region, which includes eastern Louisiana, eastern Arkansas, western Mississippi and western Kentucky, cottonwoods can grow 12-15 feet per year, allowing them to be harvested biennially.   In addition, cottonwoods will regrow from stumps, so that plantings may be managed through coppicing. However, cottonwoods in the Great Plains are susceptible to melampsora leaf rust, which reduces their vigor.   Improved cottonwood (Populus deltoides) clones that produce increased biomass have been developed at Iowa State University.  These trees may facilitate the development of cottonwood plantations for biomass production in Iowa and similar climatic zones.

Advantage:
• The non-GMO cottonwood clone has increased woody density, improved winter hardiness, resistance to rust, and a high growth rate

Application:
Bioenergy; paper and pulp

References:
Tabor, G. M. et al. 2000. Bulked segregant analysis identifies molecular markers linked to Melamspora medusa resistance in Populus deltoides.  Phytopathology 90:1039-1042

Intellectual Property:
Tangible Material

Group:
This technology is related to ISURF #4157: Trees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Aspen Clones

Stage4.png
Development Stage:
The trees have been growing for several years and could be propogated by shoot or root cuttings

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:52 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196814156Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:34 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Application:

]]>References:Tabor, G. M. et al. 2000. Bulked segregant analysis identifies molecular markers linked to Melamspora medusa resistance in Populus deltoides.  Phytopathology 90:1039-1042

]]>Intellectual Property:

]]>Group:ISURF #4157: Trees for Woody Biomass Applications: Improved Aspen Clones

]]>Stage4.pngDevelopment Stage:

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesFalseSensor for In-Situ, Wireless Soil Sensinghttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19678Summary:
Iowa State University researchers have developed a novel, self-calibrating sensor for moisture and nutrients in soil that has wireless transmission and reception capability, making it especially useful as a sensing node for applications that are distributed over a wide area.

Description:
The advent of technologies such as GPS has driven the development of precision agriculture, which enables farmers to avail inter- and intra-field variations to manage resources and inputs so that costs and environmental impacts are minimized and productivity is maximized.  To help facilitate the management of important agricultural resources, ISU researchers have developed a self-calibrating, reliable and energy efficient soil moisture and nutrient sensor which can be buried at approximately root depth and is capable of wireless transmission and reception.  This sensor, which is based on the principle of impedance spectroscopy, can take real-time measurements of soil moisture and nutrient concentrations and transmit at frequencies much less than cellular, resulting in a much larger range.  The sensor is particularly well-suited for deployment as a node in a network of sensors that are spread over a large area, such as an agriculture field or drainage basin.

Advantage:
• Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements
• Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability
• Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions

Application:
Precision Agriculture; Environmental Monitoring; Underground to Above Ground Communication

References:
1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

Patent:
Patent(s) applied for

Development Stage:
Stage2.png

Prototype on-board sensors have been tested for soil monitoring applications using soil containing saline water and shown to have utility for measuring both soil moisture and ionic concentrations.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:49:50 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196784183Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:32 GMTSummary:

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Self-calibrating to ensure accurate and robust measurements]]>Sweeps through large frequency range for better data reliability]]>Enables in situ, temporal/spatial monitoring of soil conditions]]>Application:

]]>References:1: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2014. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in situ, wireless soil sensing.  IEEE Sensors J. 14:1997-2005.

2: Gunjan Pandey, Ratnesh Kumar, and Robert J. Weber. 2013. A multi-frequency, self-calibrating, in-situ soil sensor with energy efficient wireless interface. Proc. SPIE 8721, Sensing for Agriculture and Food Quality and Safety V, 87210V; doi:10.1117/12.2021200.

]]>Patent:Patent(s) applied forDevelopment Stage:Stage2.png

]]>Desc0000.pngJayBjerkeCommercialization Manager, Engineeringjbjerke@mail.iastate.edu515-294-4740FalseHoney Bee Feeding Inhibitorhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19684Summary:
Iowa State University researchers developed a strategy for preventing honey bees from feeding on flowers on pesticide-treated plants that uses plant-based compounds as feeding deterrents.

Description:
The value of bee pollination has been estimated to be between $15 and $20 billion per year; however, the emergence of colony collapse disorder (CCD) in recent years as a significant problem affecting the health of honey bees poses a serious threat to the beekeeping and pollination industries.  CCD is also perceived as a serious threat to agriculture and food security since honey bees have become an integral tool for production of certain crops, particularly fruits and nuts.  CCD is still poorly understood at present, but environmental stressors such as exposure to pesticides at lethal or sub-lethal doses has been implicated as a cause. The lack of understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to CCD have also limited recommendations for its mitigation to best management practices for bee keepers,  and for the general public, to limiting honey bee exposure to pesticides through reducing usage, timing applications so that they are done when bees are not foraging, and planting pollinator-friendly plants.  To help address the need for better strategies to prevent or limit CCD, ISU researchers have identified a family of plant-based compounds that act as effective honey bee feeding deterrents.  These compounds may be combined with pesticides to prevent honey bees from foraging on plants that have recently been sprayed with insecticides, and thus may have utility for reducing honey bee exposure to potentially damaging chemicals.

Advantage:
• May deter honey bees from feeding on pesticide-treated plants
• Uses inexpensive, plant-based materials
• Non-GMO based

Application:
Crop production and protection

Development Stage :
Stage1.png
Pilot studies indicate that the antifeedants placed in nectar tubes in artificial flowers deter honey bees from feeding, and ISU is seeking partners for further development and commercialization of this technology.

Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:02:32 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196844215Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:29 GMTSummary:Iowa State University researchers developed a strategy for preventing honey bees from feeding on flowers on pesticide-treated plants that uses plant-based compounds as feeding deterrents.

]]>Description:The value of bee pollination has been estimated to be between $15 and $20 billion per year; however, the emergence of colony collapse disorder (CCD) in recent years as a significant problem affecting the health of honey bees poses a serious threat to the beekeeping and pollination industries.  CCD is also perceived as a serious threat to agriculture and food security since honey bees have become an integral tool for production of certain crops, particularly fruits and nuts.  CCD is still poorly understood at present, but environmental stressors such as exposure to pesticides at lethal or sub-lethal doses has been implicated as a cause. The lack of understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to CCD have also limited recommendations for its mitigation to best management practices for bee keepers,  and for the general public, to limiting honey bee exposure to pesticides through reducing usage, timing applications so that they are done when bees are not foraging, and planting pollinator-friendly plants.  To help address the need for better strategies to prevent or limit CCD, ISU researchers have identified a family of plant-based compounds that act as effective honey bee feeding deterrents.  These compounds may be combined with pesticides to prevent honey bees from foraging on plants that have recently been sprayed with insecticides, and thus may have utility for reducing honey bee exposure to potentially damaging chemicals.

]]>Advantage:May deter honey bees from feeding on pesticide-treated plants]]>Uses inexpensive, plant-based materials]]>• Non-GMO based]]>Application:Crop production and protection

]]>]]>]]>Pilot studies indicate that the antifeedants placed in nectar tubes in artificial flowers deter honey bees from feeding, and ISU is seeking partners for further development and commercialization of this technology.

]]>Desc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Agriculture| Life SciencesMethods and Compositions Comprising Steroid Honey Bee Feeding InhibitorsUtilityUnited States9,700,05215/137,0834/25/20167/11/20174/25/20367/17/201711/13/2017FalseNanoparticles Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acids and Chemicals in Plantshttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/19659Summary:
Gene delivery to plant cells is critical for understanding plant physiology and to develop new varieties with special traits.  ISU researchers have developed a novel method in plants useful for: 1) genetic transformation; 2) simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules; and 3) controlled release of small molecules using appropriate induction reagents.

Description:
Current methods of plant genetic transformation include electroporation, polyethylene glycol or Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, or a bombardment approach using metal particles.  However, none of these techniques are able to provide simultaneous delivery of both nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) and chemicals or drugs to plant cells.  These methods also do not permit targeting of non-nuclear genomes (e.g., plastids or mitochondria) or sub-cellular compartments for delivery of nucleic acids and/or other compounds.  To overcome these drawbacks, ISU researchers have recently developed a method for plant genetic transformation using mesoporous silicate nanoparticles.  Because these hollow nanoparticles can be capped, controlled release and simultaneous delivery of nucleic acid and chemicals is possible.  In addition, modification of the nanoparticles with peptides or proteins can be used to direct their sub-cellular location through the cellular addressing machinery or other receptor-ligand interactions.  The utility of this method has been demonstrated using a green fluorescent protein reporter construct and tobacco plant cells.

Advantage:
• Enables simultaneous delivery of DNA and chemicals or small molecules
• Allows controlled release of nucleic acid and/or chemicals
• Targets both nuclear and non-nuclear (organelle) genomes

Application:
Transient and stable genetic transformation of plants. Simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules for functional genomic studies. Controlled release of small molecules in planta using appropriate induction reagents.

References:
1: “A polyamidoamine dendrimer-capped mesoporous silica nanosphere-based gene transfection reagent”, Radu, D.R., Lai, C.Y., Jeftinija, K., Rowe, E.W., Lin V.-S.  J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2004) 126, 13216-7.

Development Stage:
The utility of this method was demonstrated with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and immature maize embryos.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

Stage0.png
Desc0000.png

]]>Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:36:15 GMTlicensing@iastate.eduhttp://isurftech.technologypublisher.com/technology/196593383Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:20:23 GMTSummary:Gene delivery to plant cells is critical for understanding plant physiology and to develop new varieties with special traits.  ISU researchers have developed a novel method in plants useful for: 1) genetic transformation; 2) simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules; and 3) controlled release of small molecules using appropriate induction reagents.

]]>Description:

]]>Advantage:Enables simultaneous delivery of DNA and chemicals or small molecules]]>Allows controlled release of nucleic acid and/or chemicals]]>Targets both nuclear and non-nuclear (organelle) genomes]]>Application:Transient and stable genetic transformation of plants. Simultaneous delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules for functional genomic studies. Controlled release of small molecules in planta using appropriate induction reagents.

]]>References:1: “A polyamidoamine dendrimer-capped mesoporous silica nanosphere-based gene transfection reagent”, Radu, D.R., Lai, C.Y., Jeftinija, K., Rowe, E.W., Lin V.-S.  J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2004) 126, 13216-7.

]]>Development Stage:The utility of this method was demonstrated with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and immature maize embryos.  ISU is seeking partners interested in commercializing this technology.

]]>Stage0.pngDesc0000.pngDarioValenzuelaSenior Commercialization Manager, Life Sciencesdariov@iastate.edu515-294-4740Methods of Using Capped Mesoporous SilicatesUtilityUnited States8,647,64411/788,1474/19/20072/11/20144/19/20276/1/201511/13/2017False